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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2000
There comes a time early in the year when each racing fan feels that first tingling rush of excitement over the possibility of an extraordinary Kentucky Derby. For this racing fan, that moment occurred Sunday. In races on both coasts, 3-year-olds displayed such courage and ability that each easily conjured up the image of a winner's circle celebration in a sea of red roses -- in other words, the winner's circle of the Kentucky Derby. Six weeks from today, on May 6 at Churchill Downs, as many as 20 horses will compete for this country's most coveted racing prize.
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SPORTS
By Daniel Gallen The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2013
The two Baltimore baseball stalwarts sat at a table at the Four Seasons at the Inner Harbor, reminiscing on the first time they met, their fathers and their playing days. But the conversation between Cal Ripken Jr. and Orioles manager Buck Showalter quickly turned to the future of the Orioles and, mainly, third baseman Manny Machado. Speaking to the media between the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation board meeting and the foundation's annual luncheon, where Showalter was the keynote speaker on Thursday, Ripken and Showalter discussed the rising star at great length.
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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2000
LOUISVILLE, KY. -- Anees and Aptitude, two horses who will close from the clouds, offer bettors terrific value in the Kentucky Derby today at Churchill Downs. With Trippi and Hal's Hope likely to set a sizzling pace, the 1 1/4 -mile Derby could set up for a horse who will drop back early and come running late. That is how Anees won last year's Breeders' Cup Juvenile and how Aptitude attracted a following in the Gotham and Wood Memorial Stakes. Trainers typically tout their own horses in big races (whether they mean it is another matter)
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
The Lewises needed some holiday help, not that you could tell by glancing around their Bel Air living room. The tree was up and tinseled. Four stockings dangled from the mantel. Little wooden snowmen and Santas adorned the TV cabinet, and the "Merry Christmas" pillow had re-emerged. The problem was the piano in the corner. For a musical family like the Lewises, the holidays are about singing carols and staging ad hoc ensembles with violin and cello. Always, the focal point is the upright piano, and Betsy Lewis thought it hardly sounded well-tempered.
SPORTS
By Steve Davidowitz and Steve Davidowitz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 10, 2000
Before making a few $2 wagers in today's Belmont Stakes, here's my two cents about what happened in the Preakness. Fusaichi Pegasus certainly did not run his best race. He never reached top gear while appearing to spin his wheels on the wet Pimlico racing surface. This was quite unlike the smooth-moving "Fusaichi," who handily defeated Red Bullet over a slippery Aqueduct racing surface in the Wood Memorial on April 15. Nor did "Fusaichi" resemble the powerful horse who convincingly won the Kentucky Derby.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1995
Howard County students continue to perform well on the national exam for basic skills despite a decline in their collective aptitude, according to the results of last spring's Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills.The CTBS results also showed that a gap persists between the scores of white and Asian-American students and those of African-American and Hispanic pupils.The test results for third-, fifth-, eighth- and 11th-graders who took the CTBS exam last spring were presented to the county school board Thursday night.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2001
Captain Steve and Aptitude, two runners based in the United States, are among the top three choices in the $6 million Dubai World Cup tomorrow at Nad Al Sheba Racecourse in the United Arab Emirates. Captain Steve is the 8-5 morning-line favorite and Aptitude the 5-1 third choice. Godolphin Racing's Best of the Bests is 3-1. As the richest race in the world, the Dubai World Cup headlines the richest day in horse racing. Purses for the six races for thoroughbreds total $15 million. Purses for the Breeders' Cup, North America's richest day, total $13 million.
NEWS
By TOM BOWMAN and TOM BOWMAN,SUN REPORTER | December 16, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Army met its recruiting goal for November by again accepting a high percentage of recruits who scored in the lowest category on the military's aptitude tests, Pentagon officials said yesterday, raising renewed concerns that the quality of the all-volunteer force will suffer. The Army exceeded by 256 its goal of 5,600 recruits for November, while the Army Reserve brought in 1,454 recruits, exceeding its target by 112. To do so, the Army accepted a "double-digit" percentage of recruits who scored between 16 and 30 out of a possible 99 on the military's aptitude test, said officials who requested anonymity.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2000
ELMONT, N.Y. - Bobby Frankel, trainer of Aptitude, the Belmont favorite, was extremely unhappy with his jockey, Alex Solis. After Aptitude finished a driving second in the Kentucky Derby, Frankel skipped the Preakness, saying that the A.P. Indy colt would have a better chance of winning the longer Belmont. Yesterday, after Aptitude dropped to last early and then ran his heart out to get up for second, the outspoken Frankel blasted Solis' ride. "I'm very disappointed," Frankel said. "He was way too far back.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | March 7, 2008
Clarence J. "Sonny" Morsberger, a retired Westinghouse Electric Corp. inspector who enjoyed telling stories about life in Baltimore, died Saturday of prostate cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The longtime Morrell Park resident was 81. Mr. Morsberger was born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville, the son of a Prohibition-era bootlegger. "Dad spoke about big cars with secret compartments to transport liquor and gangs coming down from New York and federal agents," said his daughter, Susanne K. Morsberger, a Harbor Hospital pharmacist.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | March 7, 2008
Clarence J. "Sonny" Morsberger, a retired Westinghouse Electric Corp. inspector who enjoyed telling stories about life in Baltimore, died Saturday of prostate cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The longtime Morrell Park resident was 81. Mr. Morsberger was born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville, the son of a Prohibition-era bootlegger. "Dad spoke about big cars with secret compartments to transport liquor and gangs coming down from New York and federal agents," said his daughter, Susanne K. Morsberger, a Harbor Hospital pharmacist.
NEWS
By TOM BOWMAN and TOM BOWMAN,SUN REPORTER | December 16, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Army met its recruiting goal for November by again accepting a high percentage of recruits who scored in the lowest category on the military's aptitude tests, Pentagon officials said yesterday, raising renewed concerns that the quality of the all-volunteer force will suffer. The Army exceeded by 256 its goal of 5,600 recruits for November, while the Army Reserve brought in 1,454 recruits, exceeding its target by 112. To do so, the Army accepted a "double-digit" percentage of recruits who scored between 16 and 30 out of a possible 99 on the military's aptitude test, said officials who requested anonymity.
NEWS
By TOM BOWMAN and TOM BOWMAN,SUN REPORTER | November 8, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The number of new recruits who scored at the bottom of the Army's aptitude test tripled last month, Pentagon officials said, helping the nation's largest armed service meet its October recruiting goal but raising concerns about the quality of the force. Former Army Secretary Thomas E. White said the service was making a mistake by lowering its standards. "I think it's disastrous. You are throwing the towel in on recruiting quality," said White, a retired general whom Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld fired in 2003 over other policy differences.
NEWS
By TOM BOWMAN and TOM BOWMAN,SUN REPORTER | October 8, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Faced with the toughest recruiting climate in nearly a decade, Army Secretary Francis J. Harvey told reporters this week that he would begin accepting more people who score in the bottom third on the military's aptitude test. What Harvey didn't say was that the Army has already done that. Recruiting figures to be released Tuesday will show that about 4 percent - or roughly 2,900 of the 73,000 recruits - scored at the bottom of the Army's test, Pentagon and military officials told The Sun. In 2004, the Army accepted just 440 soldiers from the lowest category, or about 0.6 percent of 70,000 recruits.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 18, 2005
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - Bowing to pressure from his faculty, Harvard University President Lawrence H. Summers released a transcript of his controversial, closed-door remarks about the shortage of women in the sciences and engineering. Summers' remarks, which have only been described by others until now, have fueled a widening crisis on campus. Among his comments to a conference of economists last month, Summers - a former secretary of the treasury - compared the relatively low number of women in the sciences to the numbers of Catholics in investment banking, whites in the National Basketball Association and Jews in farming.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2001
ELMONT, N.Y. - Bob Baffert drove into New York City on Friday and visited the site where the World Trade Center once stood. Yesterday, he stood in the winner's circle at Belmont Park after Officer, his electrifying 2-year-old colt, won the Champagne Stakes. "It makes you think," Baffert said of the devastation in the city. "Here I am worried about losing a race, or worrying about a horse getting sick." Then, speaking about Officer's potential, he said: "At least the people around here got a little excitement today.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2001
ELMONT, N.Y. - Bob Baffert drove into New York City on Friday and visited the site where the World Trade Center once stood. Yesterday, he stood in the winner's circle at Belmont Park after Officer, his electrifying 2-year-old colt, won the Champagne Stakes. "It makes you think," Baffert said of the devastation in the city. "Here I am worried about losing a race, or worrying about a horse getting sick." Then, speaking about Officer's potential, he said: "At least the people around here got a little excitement today.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 18, 2005
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - Bowing to pressure from his faculty, Harvard University President Lawrence H. Summers released a transcript of his controversial, closed-door remarks about the shortage of women in the sciences and engineering. Summers' remarks, which have only been described by others until now, have fueled a widening crisis on campus. Among his comments to a conference of economists last month, Summers - a former secretary of the treasury - compared the relatively low number of women in the sciences to the numbers of Catholics in investment banking, whites in the National Basketball Association and Jews in farming.
FEATURES
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2001
At some point in Rick Rivera's life, after getting kicked out of two Mexican high schools and dropping out of an American college, he figured out what it takes to succeed. But it was a long, long road for Rivera. His mother tried to guide him, pointing her finger at him after the late-night phone calls from the policia about the egg-throwing and the afternoon meetings with his teachers fed up with the spitballs. She would sit him down in the kitchen of their small Juarez, Mexico, home, shaking her hands in the air, saying, "Tienes mala actitud!"
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2001
Captain Steve and Aptitude, two runners based in the United States, are among the top three choices in the $6 million Dubai World Cup tomorrow at Nad Al Sheba Racecourse in the United Arab Emirates. Captain Steve is the 8-5 morning-line favorite and Aptitude the 5-1 third choice. Godolphin Racing's Best of the Bests is 3-1. As the richest race in the world, the Dubai World Cup headlines the richest day in horse racing. Purses for the six races for thoroughbreds total $15 million. Purses for the Breeders' Cup, North America's richest day, total $13 million.
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