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Eileen Ambrose | February 24, 2012
Maryland gas prices have risen about 20 cents per gallon since January. At about $3.56 a gallon, according to my colleague Gus Sentementes' story earlier this week, we still have a ways to go before we hit the panic level of $4 a gallon. Still, it's not too early to revisit gas-saving tips now. TrueCar compiled a list of Apps to keep fuel costs down. Here are a few that are free or cheap: GasBuddy - This compiles a list of gas prices based on consumer input. Free. iGasUp - Pricing info on 110,000 gas stations based on credit card transactions.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
A Towson University student was arrested this week after he allegedly threatened on social media to carry out an attack at the college that he said would be "Virginia Tech part 2. " Matthew David Cole, 18, was charged Thursday with making threats of mass violence and disturbing the operation of the school. He posted $100,000 bail and was released from jail Friday. "A thorough investigation is continuing, however, at this time it has been determined that there is no longer a threat to the university community," officials wrote in an email to students and staff.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
An app that maps crimes in a neighborhood and a system that provides text alerts when you get a parking ticket were just some of the ideas inspired by an informal tech entrepreneurial get-together held Saturday in response to the city's OpenBaltimore data initiative. The group of about 30, MacBook Pros in tow, met at "Civic Hack Day" at the Emerging Technology Center in Canton to collaborate and discuss the various web application projects. Many included ways to find uses for data released for the first time by the city last month.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Kevin Luskin comes from a Baltimore-based retail family known for building businesses on cutting-edge home products. Today, it's curved-screen, smart televisions. But at one time it was refrigerators. Luskin's father, Jack, and uncle, Joe, started the Luskins' home appliance business after World War II by convincing consumers to switch from iceboxes to refrigerators. Jack Luskin eventually expanded into electronics and grew to 60 stores in 21 states with the help of his famous slogan, "The Cheapest Guy in Town.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2012
Imagine, with a few finger flicks on a smartphone app, you can learn whether you'll be getting zucchini or tomatoes, strawberries or potatoes, from a Maryland farm each week, then browse for home-spun recipes and connect with other like-minded consumers. One Straw Farm, one of Maryland's largest independent agricultural operations, wants to build that app — and bring a new level of tech savvy to community-supported agriculture. Joan and Drew Norman, the owners of the farm, believe they can craft mobile apps to make their work more efficient and better connect with their customers.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | July 24, 2012
One Straw Farm , one of the biggest independent farms in Maryland and a familiar presence at farmers' markets across the Baltimore region, is on a quest to build two iPhone apps that will help modernize its business and better connect with its customers. Joan and Drew Norman, the owners of the farm, have gotten hooked on the iPhone and believe they can use it to make their work on the farm more efficient and better share and connect their customers. They've been farming since 1983 and grow on 175 acres.
FEATURES
By Lauren Schein | April 10, 2012
Not the greatest quirk for a bride-to-be who needs to squeeze into a white dress in five short months, but my fiancé and I are both self-described foodies. From indulgent dinners at Woodberry Kitchen to Soju-soaked meals at Jong Kak with friends, our social lives seem to revolve pretty heavily around eating. Even a quiet night in is often made special by the addition of a great new recipe that we have been jonesing to try. When the topic of food came up for the wedding, it was an obvious decision.
NEWS
By Francesca Lunzer Kritz, Special to the Los Angeles Times | July 14, 2010
"Is there an app for that?" When it comes to consumer healthcare applications for smart phones, the answer, increasingly, is yes. There are now close to 6,000 consumer health apps, according to a review published in March by mobihealthnews, which reports on the mobile health industry, and more are being added every day. Many are free, or cost $1 to $10 to download. Some physicians are concerned about the reliability of the medical information provided by many of these apps, which offer advice and information on a wide array of health topics, including how to find a doctor, first aid for an emergency and exercise instructions.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
The instructor for the application software-making camp at Anne Arundel Community College explained that his pupils' inventions must be at least 50 percent original work, to avoid the possibility of copyright infringement. The two dozen campers went to great lengths to ensure that their apps were unique. Some went a bit further than others. Johnathon Woodall of Airville, Pa., was part of a group that made a game involving a worker who discovers his boss has fired him. The object of the game is for the former employee to break into his ex-supervisor's office and bash him with a chair.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | August 25, 2011
When I started covering architecture and interior design back in the late 1990s, interviews with homeowners and designers about their projects inevitably turned to manila folders or three-ring binders thick with fabric swatches, torn-out magazine pages, measurements, calculations, paint chips and sketches. Today, that design file hasn't been replaced, but it's being augmented with a bevy of smartphone and tablet applications that help eliminate lugging a messy binder crammed with loose pages from home to the design studio or paint store and back.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | August 12, 2014
Walmart now has an app that says its prices really are the lowest. The discount giant has launched a web and mobile app that compares prices at rival stores and, if a competitor's price is lower, gives shoppers electronic gift cards for the difference. Walmart calls it the Savings Catcher. Here's how it works: -Go to www.walmart.com/savingscatcher or the Walmart app. -Enter the receipt number  at the bottom of your Walmart receipt. -Enter the date of the shopping trip.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
A few months ago, Gov. Martin O'Malley grew frustrated with state government's lack of creativity on the environment. He challenged his staff to look for new ideas to help the Chesapeake Bay. In response, 80 bright minds from around the state — from precocious high-schoolers to CEOs of technology companies — hunkered down over the weekend at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater for a Chesapeake-oriented marathon programming competition,...
NEWS
By Barbara Pash | July 31, 2014
In the next few months, it will be a snap to find entertainment news and venues in Towson thanks to the Towson Chamber of Commerce. The chamber is designing an online application, a one-stop shop of everything you want to know about what's happening, who's doing it and how to get there in downtown Towson. The application, downloadable for smart phones and android devices, will be free to users and to the businesses, chamber members or not, that will be in it. Brooke Bianchetti, assistant to the chamber executive director, is designing the app. "We expect to launch it in the next two to three months," she said of the approximately $10,000 to $12,000 project.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
More people in Baltimore than any city in the country search Google for information on getting criminal records expunged, but activists found the the results offering advice on how to wipe clean old arrests pretty unhelpful. So, they decided to launch their own app to walk people through the process in the hopes that simplifying how expungement works could help people with arrest records get jobs. A beta version of the app, Expunge Maryland,  went live this week . Users of the app can either pull their records from the judiciary's case search system, or follow instructions on how to get their complete rap sheet from the state.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
When app developer Mindgrub Technologies outgrew its space for the umpteenth time, CEO Todd Marks did what any good tech entrepreneur would do - he turned to Google. An analysis of his employees' commutes using Google Maps and Google Earth led Marks to Locust Point, and the former Phillips Seafood headquarters. Mindgrub set up shop there three weeks ago and is set to get an official welcome from Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and a group of city small business leaders Wednesday. "We're really growing fast and we need to attract a lot of talent," Marks said, adding that many of the young professionals Mindgrub is seeking to recruit already live in the city and want to stay there.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
When Eric Meyer's car was booted last year after being ticketed one too many times in Canton, he thought, "Man, there must be a better way to find parking. " So, the 24-year-old began brainstorming with friends over pizza and beer at Verde Pizza. They conceived of a smartphone application that would allow neighbors to alert each other to open parking spots, and got family and friends to invest. On Tuesday night, Meyer will host a Harbor East launch party for the app, called Haystack because "anyone from Canton, Fells Point or Federal Hill knows that finding parking can be like finding a needle in a haystack.
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER | February 3, 2009
The Johns Hopkins University students formed a frenzied hive around classmate Linmiao Xu and his Facebook page, but they weren't checking out the latest gossip on the Homewood campus. They were marveling last week at "Mosayick," a new Facebook application that potentially could create mosaic pictures made up of thousands of an individual's online photographs. Xu, of Albany, N.Y., developed it with another student, Billy Prin, in a January term course that just concluded at Hopkins. Students aimed to develop new, and perhaps profitable, tools for the popular social-networking site that Mark Zuckerberg launched as an undergrad at Harvard University five years ago. Facebook now has 150 million users, and its growth beyond the college set is helping it become one of the top dozen busiest Web sites in the U.S. The Hopkins' two-credit course was formally titled "Developing Photo and Video Applications for Online Social Network," but informally it was "Facebook 101."
NEWS
By Alana Semuels and Alana Semuels,Los Angeles Times | February 10, 2009
We BlackBerry owners who have iPhone envy know that there's never a worse time to be sitting next to an iPhone user than in a waiting room. You're sitting there, choosing between rereading e-mail on your BlackBerry or flipping through a magazine (yawn). Meanwhile, the guy next to you is playing his iPhone like a flute, sending pictures to strangers in the waiting room and figuring out just what hellacious music they're listening to with his Shazam app. Makes you wonder: Why can't your BlackBerry do that?
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2014
Quarters? How quaint. When paying city parking meters, Baltimore drivers may soon be able to rely on smartphones. Just as in cities such as Washington and Tel Aviv, Paris and San Francisco, Baltimore is looking to develop an app for that. The Parking Authority is soliciting bids from technology companies interested in providing a mobile phone application drivers can use to pay at thousands of parking meters across the city. The quasi-governmental agency has requested bid proposals from companies by mid-May for a three-year contract.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
Maureen Royer leaves her 13-year-old dog, Rubie, at home while she works every day, but she doesn't worry that the dog walker won't show up. Royer gets an email every time Rubie's dog walker arrives that tells her not only when the visit started, but the route the Boston terrier/pug mix will take for her stroll, how long the dog was out and when she returns home. "I know my dog is safe," Royer says. And that has made her trust Ashley Woodall, owner of See Spot Walk, even more than she did when they first started working together about a month ago. Woodall, whose business is based in Baltimore, uses an app called Pet Check to let her clients know when and where their dogs are walked.
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