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Approval Process

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EXPLORE
January 31, 2013
CA's plans to circumvent the county-mandated 16-step development approval process should not be allowed. During the lengthy downtown rezoning discussions residents argued long and hard for a process that would keep them informed of planned development in advance with opportunities to provide input into the process. This resulted in the county adopting the 16-step approval process. CA pushed the original plan for Symphony Woods, which included some ground-level walkways with a few amenities on the north side of Merriweather Post Pavilion, through the first eight steps to achieve the Planning Board's approval. CA is now changing the plan to elevated walkways with numerous different amenities on the east side of MPP and claims it can just start with step nine to acquire the rest of the needed approvals.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
A bankruptcy judge approved First Mariner Bancorp's request to auction off its Baltimore bank quickly, a process that drew heated objections from creditors and the U.S. trustee. Judge David E. Rice set the deadline to bid on 1st Mariner Bank for April 7, with the auction to be held three days later if any bids come through. In an order filed over the weekend, he wrote that the bank's parent company "articulated good and sufficient reasons" for the timing and other procedures. The bank isn't part of the bankruptcy case, and its parent has stressed that bank deposits, contracts and other business will not be affected.
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NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2000
In an attempt to strengthen the local economy, the Carroll County commissioners voted yesterday to accelerate the approval process for commercial and industrial projects, the types of projects that generate substantial tax revenue. Under the new guidelines, small-scale projects - those that involve less than half an acre - will be exempt from formal review by the county planning commission. Projects that affect less than 5,000 square feet will also be exempt from landscaping requirements.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | October 3, 2013
The following comments were included in a more lengthy presentation to the Harford County Council on Tuesday. A copy was provided for publication. On Sept. 17 the Harford County Council acting as the Board of Appeals ratified and adopted the Hearing Examiner's Decision for Case 5781 for a special development to permit a planned residential development for the construction of 198 apartment units at Plumtree and Route 24. I was disappointed with this decision and have questions about the decision and concerns how the hearing was conducted for final arguments on Sept.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | May 25, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Circumventing normal practices, the nation's top drug regulator seized control of a request to sell the "morning-after" pill without a prescription and delayed the drug's approval, two senior Food and Drug Administration officials told lawyers suing the agency over the decision. Lester M. Crawford, then acting commissioner of the FDA, intervened in early 2005 as the agency's staff was preparing to authorize over-the-counter sales to women 17 years and older, the two FDA officials said in sworn depositions last month.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | June 26, 1992
Baltimore County, which has been accused of taking too long to approve new developments, is trying to speed up the approval process and is using a 20-acre site near White Marsh to test the accelerated procedure.Developer Larry Macks of Owings Mills wants to start grading the site by September and begin construction on a 117,000-square-foot building before winter. If all goes as planned, the building, just west of Belair Road and north of Putty Hill, could be occupied and open for business early next year.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | October 23, 1991
After hearing opposition from only one person, the county commissioners voted unanimously Monday to extend a building moratorium in the Wakefield Valley area.The ban will be extended from December untilFeb. 27 to give the county time to finish the approval process on a mineral mining plan.Eleven people attended a 20-minute hearing at the County Office Building at which County Attorney Charles W. "Chuck" Thompson Jr. explained the ban.The moratorium will not affect mining companies that own land in the area, he said.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | February 11, 1993
Baltimore County's plan for a new, fast-track development-approval process has been shunted onto an unscheduled siding.County Administrative Officer Merreen E. Kelly told an approving County Council late Tuesday that the plan had been abandoned in favor of a less dramatic and slower approach.The old plan, intended for a select few high-priority, job-producing commercial developments, would have cut the approval process from the current six to 18 months to perhaps one month. The new plan calls for a three-month approval process.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | December 3, 1992
The Maryland Public Service Commission has ruled that a proposed electric power plant near Cumberland is exempt from a rigorous approval process that could have delayed the construction of the controversial plant.The 180-megawatt coal-fired plant, called Warrior Run, has become a center of contention because the utility that will buy the plant's power, Potomac Edison Co., said it would have to raise electric rates by 10 percent to 20 percent to pay for power that it no longer needs.Potomac Edison, which provides electricity to Western Maryland, contracted with AES Corp.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt | October 30, 2007
At the request of some Turners Station residents, the National Association of State Fire Marshals and federal regulators are scheduled to hold a meeting today in Washington about the approval process for liquefied natural gas projects. "Some folks who, to date, haven't been involved - who missed those initial hearings - wanted to learn about the LNG approval process," said Peter O'Rourke of the National Association of State Fire Marshals. AES Corp. is seeking approval from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to build an LNG terminal at the Sparrows Point shipyard and an 88-mile pipeline into Pennsylvania.
EXPLORE
January 31, 2013
CA's plans to circumvent the county-mandated 16-step development approval process should not be allowed. During the lengthy downtown rezoning discussions residents argued long and hard for a process that would keep them informed of planned development in advance with opportunities to provide input into the process. This resulted in the county adopting the 16-step approval process. CA pushed the original plan for Symphony Woods, which included some ground-level walkways with a few amenities on the north side of Merriweather Post Pavilion, through the first eight steps to achieve the Planning Board's approval. CA is now changing the plan to elevated walkways with numerous different amenities on the east side of MPP and claims it can just start with step nine to acquire the rest of the needed approvals.
EXPLORE
January 24, 2013
The recent Baltimore Sun wrote about a new plan (aka McCall Plan) for Symphony Woods. The park plan is gone, replaced by an "Arts District" with a transplanted Toby's Dinner Theatre, multiple restaurants, a community center, new Columbia Association headquarters and more. CA had closed sessions purportedly to discuss partnerships with other entities, and instead produced a totally new plan. A few years ago our state delegation procured a $250K grant for the planned park to assist what they thought was a shovel-ready project; no shovel has touched dirt yet.  It has long been thought that the Ulman administration, preferring the original General Growth plan for multi-story buildings in Symphony Woods, intentionally delayed this project. CA President Phil Nelson in his memo to the CA Board about the new plan for their upcoming Jan. 24 meeting, with no other mention of delays, states "The County has made explicitly clear that such delays would not be enforced on the future developments under the McCall Plan.
NEWS
July 2, 2012
Letter writer Rosalind Ellis Heid recently urged Episcopal bishops to "back off on some of their left-wing, ultra-liberal philosophies that are anathema to so many parishioners" ("Switch of faiths raises questions," June 26). As one who came of age in Baltimore's Emmanuel Episcopal Church, I value both our reformation heritage and our diversity as a church that is big enough to include a wide array of theologies, practices and beliefs. As Ms. Heid notes, Roman Catholicism is not a democracy, since decisions for the faithful are made by unelected leaders.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | May 3, 2012
Weeks ago, when 5th District County Commissioner Doug Howard scheduled his April 30 meeting with Eldersburg residents, he assumed it would be the usual "get-together" where the commissioner gives updates on ongoing issues such as the county budget, funding for schools and the future of the beleaguered Carrolltown Center mall. But by the time this past week's meeting rolled around, a more pressing matter steam rolled other issues aside - namely the controversial proposal to build a 235-unit retirement facility on the 16-acre Ely property near the Oklahoma and Bennett roads in Eldersburg.
NEWS
February 27, 2012
As a professional in the Maryland home building business, I urge members of the Maryland General Assembly to oppose Gov.Martin O'Malley's proposal to limit new residential subdivisions served by septic systems (SB 236/ HB 445 - The Governor's Sustainable Growth and Agricultural Preservation Act). If approved, the bill would have negative effects on our industry and would kill jobs. It takes planning authority away from local governments by requiring counties to add "growth tiers" into their comprehensive plans by the end of this year or else many of their septic subdivisions will be denied.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2011
The Baltimore County Council approved significant changes on Tuesday evening to a land development approach that has often drawn fire from community activists, a move that council members said would stop bad projects early and make the development process more open. At the same time, the council reversed itself and revived a planned unit development project in Catonsville that has already received poor reviews from county planning and environmental agencies. The council voted in May to kill the Thistle Landing project, which calls for 10 townhouses off Frederick Road, the main thoroughfare through the Catonsville town center.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | March 3, 2006
WASHINGTON -- As bird flu spreads more quickly than expected into Europe, the Food and Drug Administration announced measures yesterday to speed up the development and approval of new vaccines. The agency proposed the guidelines amid concerns about the ability of the United States to deal with an outbreak of an avian flu pandemic. Companies that make flu vaccines rely on a slow, egg-based process, and FDA officials expressed hope that the new guidelines would encourage other manufacturers to step in and use faster technologies to develop additional vaccines.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2000
At a time when Carroll County faces a tight budget, the commissioners are looking to bolster economic development by slashing fees and accelerating the approval process for commercial and industrial projects -- the kind of projects that generate substantial tax revenue. The three-member Board of County Commissioners voted unanimously yesterday to cut review fees -- which can total more than $4,000 per project, depending on its scope -- by 30 percent over three years. The fee reduction is expected to cost the county about $270,000 in lost revenue over the three years.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2011
A developer's plan to build a $23 million school in Anne Arundel County in exchange for approval of a large-scale residential project got the green light from the Anne Arundel County Council last night. In the first step of the approval process, the council unanimously approved zoning for the Laurel project at its Monday night meeting. Councilman Jamie Benoit, who represents the Laurel area, said he reviewed the lease agreement between Severna Park-based Polm Cos. and Imagine Global Village Academy, and after making some amendments, was "satisfied" with it. Andrew Zois, president of Polm, said last night it was a "great victory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2011
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake came to the rescue of Baltimore's fledgling food truck scene Wednesday after a city official targeted a few of the mobile businesses because he said they lacked proper permits. Alvin O. Gillard — chairman of the city's street vendors board — informed two trucks that they now must have a street vendors license, commonly used by small sidewalk carts. Although the permit costs only $25, Gillard told the truck operators that they would have to wait until June to have them approved.
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