Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAppraised Value
IN THE NEWS

Appraised Value

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2000
A Carroll County Circuit Court judge refused yesterday to rescind the county's recent purchase of farmland in Union Bridge for $850,000 - more than six times the property's appraised value - for construction of a road and railway spur that will serve Lehigh Portland Cement Co. "An injunction is usually issued to stop something from happening," said Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. "In this case, the [sale] has already occurred. ... It seems to me this issue is a ballot issue. If enough voters feel the price was too high, the voters will tell the commissioners that three years from now."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | October 31, 2013
Editor: Many readers know that the Brick House property is the kind of park addition the county requires. The appraised value of the Brick House property is about l/4 as much the other property the county is considering. The Brick House property is right next to the Howard Park Community. The county will not have such environmental clean-up costs at the Brick House property. Further, the properties are very similar in size. In fact, the Brick House property until l980 was part of Heavenly Waters/Liriodendron parks.
Advertisement
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2000
Eager to kick-start his plans for east-side waterfront revitalization, Baltimore County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger announced yesterday that the county has negotiated the purchase of two prominent commercial properties without the threat of condemnation. "These property owners are willing sellers," Ruppersberger said at a morning news conference in Middle River. "We and they are happy we have done business together." The county plans to purchase Ensor Bros. Ice House and Don's Crabs, both at 1933 Eastern Blvd.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Record and The Aegis | April 30, 2013
Editor: When I ran for City Council last year, one of the primary questions I was asked time and time again was "What are you going to do to protect the Havre de Grace Waterfront?" Not long after being selected to serve on the Havre de Grace City Council I learned that the city was negotiating to acquire the Gamatoria property at 701 Concord St. I felt this would be a tremendous opportunity to do just that…"protect the Havre de Grace Waterfront. " More importantly, this real estate was located right next to an historic landmark on the east coast; the Concord Point Lighthouse.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | August 3, 1999
Hoping to rid Towson of an eyesore in its business district, the Baltimore County Council agreed last night to pay $200,000 toward the purchase of a closed gas station -- even though the price of the half-acre parcel is nearly double its appraised value.In other action, a bill to give the council more say in developments planned on former quarries was withdrawn by the bill's sponsor, who said he wanted to work out an agreement with Arundel Corp., which is proposing two projects on quarry sites.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2000
A Carroll County circuit judge refused yesterday to rescind the county's recent purchase of farmland in Union Bridge for $850,000 - more than six times the property's appraised value - for construction of a road and railway spur that will serve Lehigh Portland Cement Co. "An injunction is usually issued to stop something from happening," said Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. "In this case, the [sale] has already occurred. ... It seems to me this issue is a ballot issue. If enough voters feel the price was too high, the voters will tell the commissioners that three years from now."
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Julie Scharper and Josh Mitchell and Julie Scharper,Sun reporters | May 8, 2007
Over the strong objections of one council member who bemoaned a waste of taxpayers' money, the Baltimore County Council approved last night the purchase of land in a crime-ridden Dundalk neighborhood slated for redevelopment. The proposed land deal in the old Yorkway apartment complex is part of the administration's plan to buy and raze the complex and then sell it for new development. In the most recent in a series of deals, the county offered $170,000 for less than two-tenths of an acre in Yorkway, using the higher of two independent appraisals.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1999
Beating the chemical industry to the buyout, Baltimore has begun acquiring a handful of remaining homes in the neighborhood of Fairfield, in effect extending the public purchase of Wagner's Point to all the communities on the Fairfield peninsula.Two large chemical plants in southern Baltimore -- detergent ingredient maker Condea Vista and herbicide producer FMC Corp. -- offered to buy the same homes this month in a "neighborly" gesture intended to ward off potential lawsuits over environmental exposure.
NEWS
December 15, 1992
By agreeing to pay $165,000 more than the appraised price for Pauline Byers Shaffer's farm, the Carroll County commissioners have set a bad precedent, as Commissioner Julia W. Gouge pointed out in opposing the transaction.Mrs. Shaffer's 104-acre farm -- which has been in her family for five generations -- is adjacent to the Carroll County Regional Airport. A portion of the farm -- about 32 acres -- was needed for a planned extension of the runway. As time passed, the airport plans have been revised and the proposed runway realigned.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2001
Saying any remedy should come at the ballot box, a Carroll County judge dismissed a taxpayers' suit yesterday against the county commissioners for paying substantially more than the appraised value of farmland needed to alleviate truck and train traffic in Union Bridge. The ruling by Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. ends the courts' role in the dispute. At issue was the commissioners' Oct. 10 purchase from Sidney Darrell Lease Jr. and David Vincent Lease of 10.6 acres, plus the right to use another 15.7 acres, for $850,000 -- more than six times the appraised value, as reported by The Sun. Construction is expected to begin next month on the first leg of the new Shepherd's Mill Road.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | November 19, 2009
The city's spending board postponed a vote on a plan to sell a parcel of West Baltimore properties to a team of developers after the city comptroller raised concerns that the buildings were being sold for a tenth of their appraised value. City Comptroller Joan M. Pratt recommended that the Board of Estimates hold off on voting after noting that the four properties in the 400 block of N. Howard Street, recently appraised at $1.2 million, were being sold to Howard Street Lofts LLC for $100,000.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | August 14, 2009
Would you take a $100 chance on winning a $1.6 million house? Organizers of an estate home raffle in Baltimore County are betting as many as 35,000 people will step up to buy a ticket, compelled by the unusually big prize - a 5-bedroom mini-mansion on an estate lot in Phoenix - and the chance to help out a local charity. House raffles such as this one have been used as fundraisers by a handful of nonprofits for years, and they are a growing phenomenon as home sellers caught in a recession look for creative ways to stand out and nonprofits seek alternative funding.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2009
Salary: $105,000 Age: 28 Years on the job: 7 How he got started: : Ryan Hlubb got his first taste of the job of an appraiser when he was a teenager and helped his father, who is also an appraiser, with tasks such as taking photographs and doing research. After high school, Hlubb attended the University of Maryland, Baltimore County as a computer science major but never finished. Instead, he went to work as a technical support supervisor for a digital security company. Later, he decided to go to work with his father as a commercial appraiser.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | August 17, 2008
There are no such things in life as a free lunch, or a $100 house. Yet there seems to be a growing number of ever-so-tantalizing home raffles popping up, as more homeowners embrace innovative ways to beat the housing slump. Two are running in Maryland right now. For $100 a pop, you can try your luck at scoring a $550,000 home in Dunkirk or a $186,000 home in Owings Mills. It sounds like a win-win for all involved. Ticket buyers get a chance at a realty gold mine, homeowners unload property in a down market and a charity gets a slice of the pie. But be warned that this little adventure is not for the faint of heart or the ill-prepared.
NEWS
January 24, 2008
City to sell long-vacant police station Baltimore will sell a long-vacant police station in Fells Point to a company that intends to develop the property into 30 condominiums, according to the terms of an agreement approved yesterday by the city's Board of Estimates. The city has agreed to sell the site, at 1621 Bank St., for $584,300 -- far below its $1 million appraised value. City officials said the developer will invest hundreds of thousands of dollars to remove asbestos, lead paint and other environmental hazards.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Julie Scharper and Josh Mitchell and Julie Scharper,Sun reporters | May 8, 2007
Over the strong objections of one council member who bemoaned a waste of taxpayers' money, the Baltimore County Council approved last night the purchase of land in a crime-ridden Dundalk neighborhood slated for redevelopment. The proposed land deal in the old Yorkway apartment complex is part of the administration's plan to buy and raze the complex and then sell it for new development. In the most recent in a series of deals, the county offered $170,000 for less than two-tenths of an acre in Yorkway, using the higher of two independent appraisals.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,sun reporter | February 5, 2007
Baltimore County officials say parkland is so scarce in some areas that they're willing to pay premium dollars when it becomes available. But a plan to buy a patch of green on the east side has raised questions from a County Council member about the price the county would pay for it. The county administration has agreed to pay $900,000 to a developer for about 20 acres of a field next to Sparrows Point High School in Edgemere. The deal requires approval of the County Council, which has scheduled a vote for tonight.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2000
In a further sign of ballooning property values in eastern Baltimore County, county government soon will buy a grain farm for 20 percent more than its appraised value, gaining room for a road and ball fields. The County Council is expected to approve tonight the $1.59 million purchase of 30 acres of agricultural land at 4905 E. Joppa Road from Bernard H. Schwartz and his brother and sons. The purchase price equals $53,000 an acre. "It's the cost of land in that area," said Robert J. Barrett, a top aide to County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,sun reporter | February 5, 2007
Baltimore County officials say parkland is so scarce in some areas that they're willing to pay premium dollars when it becomes available. But a plan to buy a patch of green on the east side has raised questions from a County Council member about the price the county would pay for it. The county administration has agreed to pay $900,000 to a developer for about 20 acres of a field next to Sparrows Point High School in Edgemere. The deal requires approval of the County Council, which has scheduled a vote for tonight.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | May 13, 2006
If you want to understand just how toxic a home mortgage can get, consider this real-life, continuing saga: Katherine Stephens is a 94-year-old widow, now living in a nursing home in southern New Jersey. According to her nephew, William Finch, she has $38 in her bank account. Monthly Social Security checks pay only a small portion of her nursing home bills. In 1988, Stephens and her husband, Harold, signed up for what they thought was a great concept for seniors: A "reverse mortgage" that would pay them $312 a month virtually in perpetuity - until they died or moved out of their house in Brigantine, N.J., near Atlantic City.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.