Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAppraisal Institute
IN THE NEWS

Appraisal Institute

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
January 26, 1997
Appraisal Institute installs 1997 officersThe Maryland chapter of the Appraisal Institute installed officers for 1997 during a holiday party at the Gramercy Mansion. A $5 donation was made to the Maryland Food Bank for every reservation made for the event.New officers include: president, David Brooks of Lippman, Frizzell & Mitchell; vice president, Richard Nichols, Richard Nichols & Associates; secretary, Sharon Cremen, Cremen Appraisal Agency; and treasurer, Bud McPherson, McPherson & Associates Inc.Cassidy & Pinkard picked for PruEXPRESSCassidy & Pinkard Inc., a regional commercial real estate brokerage firm headquartered in Washington, has been selected by the Prudential Insurance Co. of America as its exclusive marketing adviser for the PruEXPRESS program in Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
Frank Simms Dudley Jr., an Eastern Shore real estate broker and property appraiser, died of complications after surgery March 3 at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The former Baltimore resident was 93. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Frank S. Dudley, a banker, and Edith Shriner, a homemaker. He lived on Roland Avenue and attended Roland Park Country School before graduating from Gilman School in 1939. His studies at the University of Virginia were interrupted by his service in the Navy during World War II. A lieutenant, he commanded a sub chaser and initially patrolled anti-submarine nets off the New York Harbor and later off San Diego and San Francisco.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | October 17, 1999
WHAT'S THE next big trend in selling the American home? Real estate appraisers are betting that it's the pre-listing appraisal posted on the Web, offering a detailed property description, analysis of up to six "comparable" houses and professional valuation of the seller's property. It would provide prospective buyers hard appraisal data about a home upfront, rather than later, when they go to apply for a mortgage. Traditionally, professional real estate appraisers work for lenders, even though their fees are paid by homebuyers.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2009
Salary: $105,000 Age: 28 Years on the job: 7 How he got started: : Ryan Hlubb got his first taste of the job of an appraiser when he was a teenager and helped his father, who is also an appraiser, with tasks such as taking photographs and doing research. After high school, Hlubb attended the University of Maryland, Baltimore County as a computer science major but never finished. Instead, he went to work as a technical support supervisor for a digital security company. Later, he decided to go to work with his father as a commercial appraiser.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2009
Salary: $105,000 Age: 28 Years on the job: 7 How he got started: : Ryan Hlubb got his first taste of the job of an appraiser when he was a teenager and helped his father, who is also an appraiser, with tasks such as taking photographs and doing research. After high school, Hlubb attended the University of Maryland, Baltimore County as a computer science major but never finished. Instead, he went to work as a technical support supervisor for a digital security company. Later, he decided to go to work with his father as a commercial appraiser.
NEWS
May 19, 2006
Sigmond L. "Skip" Seward, a retired real estate appraiser who was active in his church, died of a rare cancer of the appendix Saturday at his Towson home. He was 63. Mr. Seward was born in Baltimore and raised on St. Georges Avenue in Govans. He was a 1961 graduate of Loyola High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1965 from Loyola College. He enlisted in the Army and served in Korea for 13 months, and after returning to Baltimore became an apprentice real estate appraiser for W. Burton Guy and Maryland National Bank.
BUSINESS
By Daniel Taylor and Daniel Taylor,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2004
Maryland home appraisers and bankers are discussing ways to lessen what some describe as growing pressure to inflate housing values as scores of homeowners try to tap into the increased equity in their houses. The National Appraisal Institute and the American Bankers Association met last month to discuss new guidelines for appraiser-lender relationships. Lenders rely on licensed appraisers to evaluate a home using a formula that includes recent sales in the neighborhood, the condition of the property and any upgrades or repairs that have been done or are needed.
BUSINESS
By Ken Harney and Ken Harney,earthlink | April 20, 2007
Have inflated appraisals helped fuel the current surge in foreclosures by credit-strapped borrowers? Are they at the core of many mortgage fraud schemes? The four largest trade groups representing appraisers say yes - and they are asking federal financial regulators to crack down on lenders and loan officers who pressure appraisers to raise valuations to allow overpriced deals to go through. Led by the 22,000-member Appraisal Institute, the groups told regulators last week that subprime lenders experiencing high rates of foreclosures often have been guilty of "systematic inattention" to the accuracy and sources of the valuations backing the mortgages they funded.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | January 19, 2003
WHEN the appraisal for a home purchase is off the mark by thousands of dollars, who is responsible? When an appraiser totally misses - or ignores - readily apparent structural defects in a house that depress the property's true market value, who is to blame? Obviously the appraiser. But under what could turn out to be a controversial new consumer-protection plan by the Bush administration, the government wants to hold the mortgage lender equally responsible with the appraiser for such errors.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | November 4, 2001
REACTING to market uncertainties in the wake of Sept. 11, the nation's principal professional society for real estate appraisers has instructed its 20,000 members to take extraordinary new precautions in valuing homes and commercial properties across the country. The Appraisal Institute wants members to make clear to their clients - banks, home mortgage lenders and individual consumers - that it may still be too early to properly assess the effects of the terrorist acts and economic aftershocks on the market values of real estate.
BUSINESS
By Ken Harney and Ken Harney,earthlink | April 20, 2007
Have inflated appraisals helped fuel the current surge in foreclosures by credit-strapped borrowers? Are they at the core of many mortgage fraud schemes? The four largest trade groups representing appraisers say yes - and they are asking federal financial regulators to crack down on lenders and loan officers who pressure appraisers to raise valuations to allow overpriced deals to go through. Led by the 22,000-member Appraisal Institute, the groups told regulators last week that subprime lenders experiencing high rates of foreclosures often have been guilty of "systematic inattention" to the accuracy and sources of the valuations backing the mortgages they funded.
NEWS
May 19, 2006
Sigmond L. "Skip" Seward, a retired real estate appraiser who was active in his church, died of a rare cancer of the appendix Saturday at his Towson home. He was 63. Mr. Seward was born in Baltimore and raised on St. Georges Avenue in Govans. He was a 1961 graduate of Loyola High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1965 from Loyola College. He enlisted in the Army and served in Korea for 13 months, and after returning to Baltimore became an apprentice real estate appraiser for W. Burton Guy and Maryland National Bank.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | August 8, 2004
DOES IT really matter if the appraisal on the house you buy is accurate? Is a little fudging a big deal? You bet. If your valuation is inflated to hit the contract price - a not-uncommon occurrence, according to appraisers themselves - you could end up with a mortgage that's larger than the market resale value of your home. Or if the appraiser ignores some key value-depressing features of the property, you could be stuck with thousands of dollars in unexpected repair bills. Now the federal government is weighing into this issue with a blunt new message to appraisers and the lenders who hire them: Don't play games with home appraisals.
BUSINESS
By Daniel Taylor and Daniel Taylor,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2004
Maryland home appraisers and bankers are discussing ways to lessen what some describe as growing pressure to inflate housing values as scores of homeowners try to tap into the increased equity in their houses. The National Appraisal Institute and the American Bankers Association met last month to discuss new guidelines for appraiser-lender relationships. Lenders rely on licensed appraisers to evaluate a home using a formula that includes recent sales in the neighborhood, the condition of the property and any upgrades or repairs that have been done or are needed.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | January 19, 2003
WHEN the appraisal for a home purchase is off the mark by thousands of dollars, who is responsible? When an appraiser totally misses - or ignores - readily apparent structural defects in a house that depress the property's true market value, who is to blame? Obviously the appraiser. But under what could turn out to be a controversial new consumer-protection plan by the Bush administration, the government wants to hold the mortgage lender equally responsible with the appraiser for such errors.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | November 4, 2001
REACTING to market uncertainties in the wake of Sept. 11, the nation's principal professional society for real estate appraisers has instructed its 20,000 members to take extraordinary new precautions in valuing homes and commercial properties across the country. The Appraisal Institute wants members to make clear to their clients - banks, home mortgage lenders and individual consumers - that it may still be too early to properly assess the effects of the terrorist acts and economic aftershocks on the market values of real estate.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | August 8, 2004
DOES IT really matter if the appraisal on the house you buy is accurate? Is a little fudging a big deal? You bet. If your valuation is inflated to hit the contract price - a not-uncommon occurrence, according to appraisers themselves - you could end up with a mortgage that's larger than the market resale value of your home. Or if the appraiser ignores some key value-depressing features of the property, you could be stuck with thousands of dollars in unexpected repair bills. Now the federal government is weighing into this issue with a blunt new message to appraisers and the lenders who hire them: Don't play games with home appraisals.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | March 7, 1999
SHOULD the appraiser you pay $400 to value a house you're buying tell you its innermost secrets -- that there are multiple safety code violations, the furnace is shot and the basement is loaded with asbestos?The answer has provoked a heated debate that should interest anyone who's about to buy, sell or refinance.Lined up on one side are federal housing officials who have drafted an aggressive new, consumer-oriented standard for real estate appraisers valuing all homes financed with federal mortgage insurance.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | October 17, 1999
WHAT'S THE next big trend in selling the American home? Real estate appraisers are betting that it's the pre-listing appraisal posted on the Web, offering a detailed property description, analysis of up to six "comparable" houses and professional valuation of the seller's property. It would provide prospective buyers hard appraisal data about a home upfront, rather than later, when they go to apply for a mortgage. Traditionally, professional real estate appraisers work for lenders, even though their fees are paid by homebuyers.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | March 7, 1999
SHOULD the appraiser you pay $400 to value a house you're buying tell you its innermost secrets -- that there are multiple safety code violations, the furnace is shot and the basement is loaded with asbestos?The answer has provoked a heated debate that should interest anyone who's about to buy, sell or refinance.Lined up on one side are federal housing officials who have drafted an aggressive new, consumer-oriented standard for real estate appraisers valuing all homes financed with federal mortgage insurance.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.