Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAppraisal
IN THE NEWS

Appraisal

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 23, 1992
The Harford County Appraisers Society has scheduled two three-hour continuing education seminars for Wednesday at the American Legion Post 39, 500 Conowingo Road, in Bel Air.Registration begins at 8 a.m. for the morning session, "Introduction to Appraisal for the Real Estate Professional," and at noon for the afternoon seminar, "Introduction to the Auction Process for the Real Estate Professional."Fee for each seminar is $10 for members and $15 for non-members. Lunch is included for those who register for both sessions.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2013
James Callear flipped back and forth between his laptop and a fat stack of books as he tried to assign a value to a set of Hull pottery for Bonnie Crabbs at an American Legion post in Westminster. Crabbs was among dozens who brought their antiques to be appraised Saturday as part of a fundraiser for the Historical Society of Carroll County - and among those who went home pleasantly surprised. Callear, who has an antiques business in Barnesville, narrowed down the pottery to a kind made between 1949 and 1950, figuring a yellow pottery basket might fetch $135 and two small candleholders as much as $225 each.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Brian Sullam and Brian Sullam,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- Even though the City Council president asked his fellow members to defer action on the new police headquarters, the four disregarded his wishes Monday night.Council President William F. Haifley was out of town but circulated a letter asking his colleagues not to take any action until the next meeting, which will take place June 1 because the regularly scheduled date would have been May 25, Memorial Day.On the council's agenda Monday was a request to spend $1,200 for an appraisal of the Westminster Auto Parts store, which the city wants to buy for the new police headquarters.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | August 14, 2013
In 1970, one of Barbara Bonnell's favorite art galleries purchased a set of 12 framed, antique lithographs - one for each month of the year - for a client who, as it turned out, didn't want them after all. The gallery called Bonnell, then of Guilford, to see if she would be interested in buying them. She and her husband, Robert Bonnell Jr., paid $2,500 for the set, which dates to 1802. On Wednesday, Bonnell, 82, now a resident of Roland Park Place and chair of its residents' association, brought the August lithograph, of a woman and her child, downstairs to the dining room to get it appraised at a "treasure hunting" event sponsored by the retirement community and modeled after "Antiques Roadshow" on TV. Bonnell guessed that the set, made in Paris, France, would be worth about $3,000 now. She was wrong.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | January 26, 1995
The Columbia Association has agreed to terms of a $1 million land deal with the Rouse Co. for a recreational vehicle storage park without an independent appraisal that might take into account adjacent hazardous waste dumps.The deal will be contingent on an environmental study, said CA spokeswoman Pamela Mack, who added that "we go in with anticipation that there's not an [environmental] problem."The Columbia Council, the CA's board of directors, hasn't decided whether to get an independent appraisal of the proposed $1 million purchase of 4.75 acres in the former General Electric industrial park off Snowden River Parkway in east Columbia.
BUSINESS
By Dian Hymer | December 12, 1993
When should I get a property appraised?An appraisal is a professional opinion of the value of a property. Value can be based on the cost to replace a property, the income a property generates, a property's market value or a combination of these.You might want a replacement cost appraisal to make sure you have adequate insurance coverage to rebuild if your house burns down. But at the time you buy a house, you're primarily interested in an appraisal that's based on market value.An appraisal completed by a professional appraiser is required by lenders before they'll approve your home loan.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | January 6, 2002
COULD 2002 be the year when you buy a home or refinance a mortgage, and your lender surprises you with the news: Oh, by the way, we're not going to need an appraisal on your property. Just give us $50 at closing and we'll eliminate the $300-$350 you'd normally have to pay. Could the most traditional and long-standing piece of the homebuying and financing puzzle - the professional property appraisal - be headed for oblivion? Probably not - and certainly not in 2002. But the biggest player in the American housing finance market, mega-investor Fannie Mae, quietly has been moving in that direction.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | September 30, 2009
Jonathan C. "Heimi" Heimert, a real estate appraiser who earlier had been a resort cook, ended his life Sept. 21. The Morrell Park resident was 49. Born in Baltimore and raised in Towson, Mr. Heimert was a 1977 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1982 from the University of Maryland, College Park. Mr. Heimert began working during high school and later in college as a prep cook and line cook at the old Shane's Restaurant in Timonium. After graduating from college, he was recruited to be a sous chef at the Maryland Club.
BUSINESS
By Michael Gisriel | July 17, 1994
Q: My wife and I purchased a home in 1992; it was appraised at $157,350. In January, we refinanced, and the bank's appraisal was only $131,000. How can we correct this?J. Silver, Owings MillsA: When faced with what you believe to be a low appraisal, either meet with or write to the appraiser. To make your case, you must be able to support with objective facts a higher valuation. Merely stating that your house is worth more or that you paid more for the house will not work.You must obtain "comparables" -- recent sales of houses that are similar to yours.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | April 14, 1991
An appraisal of the Lucas collection of art -- which th Maryland Institute College of Art, is considering whether to sell -- has been completed by art dealer and appraiser William J. Tomlinson, who said a previous estimate of its worth as $15 million to $20 million is "much too high."The institute has been considering the sale of the 20,000-piece collection, either whole or in part, for at least two years. Virtually all of the works have been on loan to the Baltimore Museum of Art for almost 60 years, with a few pieces at the Walters Art Gallery.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
The Maryland Transportation Authority is reviewing a request from CSX Transportation Corp. to lease about five acres under Interstate 95 to be used for construction of the train and truck depot that will serve the Port of Baltimore. The land would allow CSX to expand the footprint of the 70-acre site near the Morrell Park neighborhood in Southwest Baltimore for its $90 million facility to transfer cargo containers from trains to trucks and vice versa. The state has promised to pay one-third of the cost.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
Frank Simms Dudley Jr., an Eastern Shore real estate broker and property appraiser, died of complications after surgery March 3 at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The former Baltimore resident was 93. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Frank S. Dudley, a banker, and Edith Shriner, a homemaker. He lived on Roland Avenue and attended Roland Park Country School before graduating from Gilman School in 1939. His studies at the University of Virginia were interrupted by his service in the Navy during World War II. A lieutenant, he commanded a sub chaser and initially patrolled anti-submarine nets off the New York Harbor and later off San Diego and San Francisco.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
William F. Beauchamp, a real estate appraiser and avid sports fan who founded his own firm in the mid-1980s, died Wednesday of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Timonium resident was 57. "His father had been an appraiser, and he got his skills in part from him, and then embellished them," said Mark J. Plogman, who worked as an appraiser at Mr. Beauchamp's firms for the past 25 years. "When he started his firm, he invited me to join.
NEWS
July 20, 2012
The amount of subjectivity in the valuation of real estate is destroying the confidence of real estate owners and real estate lenders, and it is killing owners' and buyers' ability to finance or refinance property. Worse, the lack of consistency is significantly damaging the industry's ability to recover. Also, and to make matters worse, there is no consistency between an independent licensed appraiser's value and the value of a municipal tax assessment. The inconsistency of the results is in part due to the limited knowledge of the appraisers.
EXPLORE
By Diane Pajak | December 14, 2011
Caplan's was a fixture of Historic Ellicott City for 26 years. But as owner John Caplan shared, “We decided to close our retail business there because the auction and appraisal business had grown to the point where we needed to focus solely on that.” Caplan's Auction & Appraisal Co. recently relocated to the Cotton Shed Building in historic Savage Mill. Auctions are held twice a week at that location -- making Caplan's one of the busiest auctioneers in the state. The free admission public auctions are held Sundays at 4:30 p.m. and Wednesdays at 6 p.m. Court-certified in the state of Maryland, Caplan's offers free verbal appraisals at any time and also offers walk-in and walk-through services.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | November 16, 2011
At Monday's press conference at the Castle in Owings Mills, Ravens coach John Harbaugh, who was not in the best of spirits after Sunday's 22-17 loss to the 3-6 Seattle Seahawks, scoffed at a reporter who asked if the Ravens might have tripped over a psychological hurdle in their three road losses. "I'm not a psychologist,” Harbaugh said. “I think what you do is you look at football. … We have to coach better, we have to play better, and we'll win those three football games.
BUSINESS
By Christi Harlan and Christi Harlan,Dow Jones News Service | March 16, 1991
DALLAS -- In an effort to spur real estate sales, the staff of the federal Resolution Trust Corp. is recommending that government-owned properties be valued on the basis of a single appraisal, instead of the current average of three appraisals per property.The recommendation, if accepted by the RTC oversight board, would eliminate part of the drawn-out sales process that has driven many buyers away from the RTC's $17 billion portfolio of properties. Those properties, the legacy of failed thrifts across the country, are costing the RTC about $1.5 billion a year to carry, according to RTC Deputy Director Lamar Kelly Jr.Current RTC policy calls for an appraisal of a property's value at the time it is made available for sale.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | April 1, 2001
THE COUNTRY'S second-largest source of home mortgage money has a money-saving new proposition for homebuyers across the country: Don't bother paying $350 to $450 for a traditional real estate appraisal. Skip it and avoid all but $50 or $200 of what you'd normally pay for a valuation of the property you're buying. Sound intriguing? Beginning April 8, Freddie Mac, the giant home-loan investor, plans to change one of the oldest rules of the real estate game. On certain "low-risk" mortgages it finances, Freddie Mac no longer will require a formal appraisal.
EXPLORE
September 13, 2011
Barbara Cantrell was honored last week as the Appraisal Institute's September "Volunteer of Distinction" for Region VI. Cantrell, a Halethorpe resident, has worked in the real estate valuation profession for 10 years. Since 2001, she has worked at Lipman Frizzell & Mitchell in Columbia and is now a senior associate. "Barbara Cantrell is an example of the outstanding individuals who belong to the Appraisal Institute," institute president Joseph Magdziarz in a release.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2010
Matthew J. Smith Sr., a retired real estate appraiser who had been a newspaper reporter, died Wednesday of lung cancer at a daughter's Fallston home. He was 77. Mr. Smith, the son of a U.S. Treasury Department employee and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Anneslie. He was a graduate of Towson Catholic High School and attended the University of Baltimore and the University of Maryland, College Park. During the Korean War, he was drafted into the Army and was a graduate of the Army Dental Technician School at Fort Sam Houston in Texas.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.