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NEWS
December 9, 2010
Your article about the appointments of County Executive Kevin Kamenetz shows he is out of touch with the public by submitting Vince Gardina and Sam Moxley to positions in county government ("Baltimore County's familiar faces," Dec. 7). These two individuals have lived on the public dole for years and have accumulated large pensions. They do not need another pension or taxpayer jobs. The newly elected County Council members now have the opportunity to show the public they are not going to be a rubber stamp for Mr. Kamenetz and vote against these two appointments.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
A recent appointee to the Baltimore City school board resigned Thursday, according to the mayor's office, which said it had discovered inconsistencies in his resume. Anthony A. Hamilton said he held a master's degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Education, according to biographical information on the board's website and a news release from Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Gov. Martin O'Malley announcing his appointment to the board in June. But a Hopkins spokeswoman said the university never awarded him a degree and a review of the school's database did not turn up a student by that name.
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NEWS
January 2, 2012
The fact that Nathan Chapman and Richard Stewart were both subjects of articles in a recent issue of The Sun underscores the exquisite judgment of our recent Democratic governors ("Pension scandal figure Chapman set for release" and "O'Malley says he'll return donation from tax cheat," Dec. 30). Mr. Chapman, appointed by former Gov. Parris Glendening to chair the University System of Maryland's Board of Regents, also persuaded the governor to appoint his mistress to the board of trustees overseeing Maryland's pension system, then used his access to infuse Maryland pension money into his failing companies, which he was systematically looting at the same time.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
When Laura Neuman heard that an Annapolis salad dressing maker was planning to move his business out of state, she arranged to meet with him. Neuman listened to Greg Vetter's story and made some calls. "She just said, 'Dude, you are NOT leaving Maryland,'" recounted Vetter, CEO of Tessemae's All Natural. "I don't know the nitty-gritty of how she did it, but she did it. And now we're in this insane, awesome space, and we don't have to move to Kentucky. " Keeping Vetter's company in Maryland last year became the latest success for Neuman.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 23, 1998
The Howard County Council last night introduced the names of the five people likely to be the firstappointments to the county's new hearing Board for Liquor License Issues, despite objections from the council's two Democrats that the GOP majority is rushing the appointments before the November election.The five appointees, who were chosen by County Executive Charles I. Ecker from lists submitted by each of the council members, are scheduled to be confirmed by the council next month.Several of the appointees, who were selected by council district, are politically connected.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | November 10, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In the spring of 1990 Barbara Gleason snapped up the offer of a $67,000 deputy directorship -- a political appointment -- in the Department of Education's public affairs division."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | August 4, 1993
Last year, when Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden gave his appointees pay raises of 4.5 percent without telling the County Council, several members complained that the executive had sneaked the raises past them.This year, those same council members approved 8.6 percent pay raises for their own two top appointees -- a move that they defend because it was done openly during public budget deliberations.Council members said the $5,868 raises for council secretary Thomas J. Peddicord Jr. and auditor Stephen L. Kirchner are further justified because they are based on the raises that Mr. Hayden granted his appointees last year.
NEWS
February 26, 1996
IN ONE OF THE most profound economic moves of his administration, President Clinton has structured a Federal Reserve Board that is very likely to continue the restrained monetary policy of recent years.His new appointees -- budget director Alice Rivlin and St. Louis economist Laurence Meyer -- are regarded as kindred spirits of Fed chairman Alan Greenspan, who fulfilled expectations in the financial community by getting a third term in his powerful post.The new board will be taking over at a moment when the nation is experiencing a "growth recession," one in which expansion of the gross domestic product is barely above zero.
NEWS
By Ken Silverstein and Ken Silverstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - In the days since Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, Federal Emergency Management Agency director Michael Brown has come under withering attack, with critics charging that his lack of prior experience in dealing with natural disasters contributed to his agency's poor performance. But Brown is just one of at least five current and former senior FEMA officials appointed under President Bush whose professional backgrounds showed few qualifications in the area of disaster relief when they arrived at the agency.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Political appointees are turning government public relations offices into propaganda machines for the Bush administration.Scores of appointees have moved into top federal PR jobs formerly held by career civil servants, personnel records indicate. Hundreds of Republican campaign workers have been rewarded with the jobs since 1988."It's an ominous development because it can only lead to more distortion, more skewing of the information that gets to the public," says David Wise, who has written widely on government secrecy and deception.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
President Barack Obama is expected to soon nominate a new head of the Social Security Administration, replacing an incumbent appointed by his predecessor, George W. Bush, but the White House is mum on who should take the helm at the agency, which faces voluminous backlogs, potential insolvency and a raft of critics. Social Security Commissioner Michael J. Astrue's six-year term expires Jan. 19. His successor must be confirmed by the Senate, in a process that Sen. Ben Cardin, a Maryland Democrat, expects will take a couple of months from the hearings to a vote.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley on Friday appointed the director of the "No Kid Hungry" state campaign to lead the Governor's Office for Children. Anne Sheridan will take on the governor's goal to make Maryland the first state to end childhood hunger among its residents by 2015. The Office for Children also promotes youth health and wellness. "In our state, we believe in our children growing healthy, growing educated, and growing strong," O'Malley said in a statement. "We know that Anne's wealth of knowledge and expertise will help us protect the priorities of Maryland's children and improve their quality of life so, together, we can give them the tools they need to build a better, stronger future.
NEWS
April 13, 2012
I want to thank The Sun for its coverage of the appointment of the Baltimore County school superintendent and, almost concurrently, the effort on behalf of the legislators to add elected members to the county's school board ("Baltimore County school board OKs Dance as superintendent," April 11, and "Balto. Co. school board bill fails in final hours of Assembly session," April 10). As a resident of Baltimore County, I am dismayed, disheartened and, frankly, disgusted, that there did not seem to be more public outcry about these two recent, critical and seemingly connected developments in the future of our public schools.
NEWS
January 2, 2012
The fact that Nathan Chapman and Richard Stewart were both subjects of articles in a recent issue of The Sun underscores the exquisite judgment of our recent Democratic governors ("Pension scandal figure Chapman set for release" and "O'Malley says he'll return donation from tax cheat," Dec. 30). Mr. Chapman, appointed by former Gov. Parris Glendening to chair the University System of Maryland's Board of Regents, also persuaded the governor to appoint his mistress to the board of trustees overseeing Maryland's pension system, then used his access to infuse Maryland pension money into his failing companies, which he was systematically looting at the same time.
NEWS
August 4, 2011
There is ample evidence that Baltimore County's school board has been failing to do its job of representing the community and holding the superintendent accountable. In just the last few years, we've had the debacle of an overheated Ridgely Middle School, ethics questions surrounding the system's use of a former top administrator's proprietary grading system and software, no-bid contracts with a firm run by a former colleague of Superintendent Joe A. Hairston, the uproar over the system's sudden crackdown on outside groups using the schools for fundraising, and the district's decision to fill administrative jobs instead of classroom positions.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley removed David A. Geier from Maryland's Commission on Autism on Friday, telling his one-time appointee in a letter that "you do not at the present time qualify to serve. " O'Malley told Geier, who has only a bachelor's degree, that he does not qualify under Maryland law to serve as a "diagnostician," the title he held on the advisory commission. The governor also cited charges brought against him this week by the Maryland Board of Physicians. "I regret that you were not willing to withdraw from the Commission and that this action is therefore necessary," the governor said.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | November 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Significant turnover in the federal work force is inevitable when a new administration takes over, and Democrats have already begun pulling the rug out from under Republican political appointees.On Nov. 4, Sen. David Pryor, D-Ark., sent letters to each federal agency warning them that he will monitor the conversion of government appointees to career employees.Pryor, a long-time friend of President-elect Bill Clinton, fears that appointees at risk of losing well-paying jobs will try to "burrow in" -- to use their influence to land career civil service or Senior Executive Service positions.
NEWS
March 17, 1992
The Supreme Court recently completed scheduling cases for the 1991-1992 term. The number of opinions that will be handed down for the term will be the smallest in over 20 years. In the 1970s, the court averaged 140 decisions a year. In the 1980s, it averaged 151. Last term (1990-1991), the court handed down 120 opinions. This year's total could be only slightly more than 100.Something is going on, and it is not that Americans have quit filing lawsuits and appeals. In fact, there have been more requests of the Supreme Court to hear cases this term than ever.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2010
The Baltimore County Council will get its first crack at County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's top-level staff picks on Tuesday. Kamenetz, a Democrat, has submitted a list of nominees largely made up of Baltimore County government veterans, some of whom have shifted positions or returned from work in the private sector. The 17 nominees include Fred Homan, whom Kamenetz wants to keep as county administrative officer, and retired Councilman Vincent J. Gardina, who would head the new Department of Environmental Protection and Sustainability.
NEWS
December 9, 2010
Your article about the appointments of County Executive Kevin Kamenetz shows he is out of touch with the public by submitting Vince Gardina and Sam Moxley to positions in county government ("Baltimore County's familiar faces," Dec. 7). These two individuals have lived on the public dole for years and have accumulated large pensions. They do not need another pension or taxpayer jobs. The newly elected County Council members now have the opportunity to show the public they are not going to be a rubber stamp for Mr. Kamenetz and vote against these two appointments.
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