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By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | May 3, 1991
The County Council raised the retirement age for elected and appointed officials from 50 to 60 Wednesday night.The seven-member council unanimously voted in favor of the pension law revision, though council members George F. Bachman, D-Linthicum, and Diane R. Evans, R-Arnold, wanted to withdraw the legislation for further study.The bill applies to workers hired after last Dec. 1.Bachman and Evans were concerned that the legislation may be open to legal challenge by employees hired between that date and the day the new law takes effect.
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2010
Gov. Martin O'Malley announced Friday appointments to education boards and commissions across the state. Among the appointees to the University System of Maryland Board of Regents are Paul L. Vance, former superintendent for the District of Columbia's school system; Louise M. Gonzales, an attorney; and Leslie Donald Hall, a junior at Bowie State University, serving as the student regent. Sandra L. Jimenez, the parent involvement specialist for Prince George's County schools, was appointed to the Maryland Higher Education Commission.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1994
In January, the County Council fixed a financially troubled pension plan for elected and appointed officials by reducing benefits that were increased in 1989.Now, the council must decide whether to roll back those lucrative benefits.The council is considering one bill that would reduce pensions of officials who have retired and another that would make them pay back their higher benefits with interest. Meanwhile, the county's Pensions Oversight Commission wants to decrease the benefits of five former and current county officials it believes were responsible for the 1989 law."
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2003
THE OTHER night, members of the activist group ACORN (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now) occupied the chairs of the city's nine appointed school board members and (until police removed them) declared themselves "the new board of the Baltimore City school system." ACORN's anger is understandable. The Board of School Commissioners shares the responsibility for the system's financial crisis and the resulting dismissal of more than 700 employees. And this board is far from a perfect cross section of Baltimore City.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1998
The last debate before Carroll voters go to the polls tomorrow to decide whether to change their form of government was the longest and most esoteric.All of the big questions about whether to keep Carroll's three-commissioner form of government or follow other counties in the Baltimore metropolitan area and switch to a county executive and county council had been argued.Last night, the standing-room-only crowd of more than 60 people in Eldersburg asked questions for two hours about matters buried deep within the charter that might provide the framework for the new government.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | December 22, 1993
The County Council has decided to fix the financially troubled pension fund for elected and appointed officials by switching, at the recommendation of the Pension Oversight Commission, to a plan that pays benefits based on employee contributions rather than years of service.The commission, a panel of citizens and representatives of county employee unions, had earlier recommended approval of a plan devised by County Executive Robert R. Neall that would have merged the plan for elected and appointed officials with the financially healthy fund for general county employees.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | September 17, 1993
County Executive Robert R. Neall has drafted legislation to merge the financially troubled pension fund for elected and appointed officials with the general employees pension fund and to freeze benefits for current officials.The bill, to be introduced to the County Council Monday night, also will double the contribution for those who transfer to the general fund to 8 percent of their salary. Any future elected or appointed officials must join the employees pension fund.Adding to the pension reform fray, Council Chairman David G. Boschert said he will introduce a bill of his own Monday to prohibit future council members from collecting a county pension.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | October 19, 1993
The Anne Arundel County Council took up pension reform last night, considering three bills that would save the county millions of dollars in pension benefits for future employees.Although the council took no final action, it did approve several amendments to a bill that would make it more expensive for county employees to transfer service credits from other governments.Among the amendments is a proposal that would require five years of county employment before someone could benefit from the years worked in another government.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1994
The County Council will consider four bills tonight sponsored by Councilwoman Maureen Lamb dealing with the financially troubled pension fund for appointed and elected officials.Perhaps the most controversial would allow most of the 17 present and former county workers mistakenly included in the generous pension plan to keep their benefits.The legislation addresses a legal opinion issued by the county attorney that holds the employees are not "appointed officials" as defined by state law and therefore were never entitled to the plan's more generous benefits.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | October 18, 1993
The Anne Arundel County Council, beset by complaints its pension system is out of control, is scheduled to considers three bills tonight that would end one financially troubled fund, prohibit future council members from collecting benefits for their time in office and make it more expensive to transfer service credits.The changes come after independent auditors reported that some county pension policies have cost the funds millions of dollars.The most widely publicized financial difficulties prompted County Executive Robert R. Neall to introduce a bill that would merge the appointed and elected officials' pension fund with the general employees' pension fund.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
Faced with a mounting budget crisis, the city's Board of Estimates is expected to approve a proposal today to increase health care costs for elected and appointed officials, and all other nonunion city employees. The proposal would take effect Jan. 1 next year and is expected to bolster Mayor Martin O'Malley's chances of persuading unions to agree to similar calls for increased health care contributions. O'Malley said in his State of the City speech this month that city workers should expect such sacrifices in order for the city to control its budget.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1998
The last debate before Carroll voters go to the polls tomorrow to decide whether to change their form of government was the longest and most esoteric.All of the big questions about whether to keep Carroll's three-commissioner form of government or follow other counties in the Baltimore metropolitan area and switch to a county executive and county council had been argued.Last night, the standing-room-only crowd of more than 60 people in Eldersburg asked questions for two hours about matters buried deep within the charter that might provide the framework for the new government.
NEWS
June 10, 1996
&TC James L. Dollar has been named acting vice president for academic and student affairs at Anne Arundel Community College.The assistant dean and chairman of the humanities division will replace Dennis Golladay, who has taken a post as president of Cayuga County Community College in Auburn, N.Y.Dollar, named as 1986 Teacher of the Year by the State Board for Community Colleges, is a professor of philosophy and director of the school's honor program....
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1996
By including salary increases for 15 appointed officials in his proposed $1.36 billion budget, Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger III has gotten two things he did not want: public criticism and topsy-turvy pay scales.Criticism of the raises -- which boosted the salaries of several department heads by 10.7 percent while many government employees received no raise -- came from Democrats and Republicans during a County Council budget debate last week.The council sets salaries for the executive and administrative officer and has authority to cut the budget request, but it has no direct control over the salaries of department heads and other top appointed officials, whose raises total $77,430.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 21, 1995
An Anne Arundel Circuit Court judge ordered the county yesterday not to implement legislation slashing retirement benefits for former appointed and elected officials after 12 of them filed suit to restore their pensions.Judge Lawrence H. Rushworth ordered that the bill, signed into law Nov. 15 by County Executive John G. Gary, not go into effect for at least 10 days while lawyers on both sides prepare their cases.The officials, who were enrolled in the Appointed and Elected Officials retirement plan, filed suit yesterday, asking for unspecified monetary damages and legal fees.
NEWS
By JOHN A. MORRIS and JOHN A. MORRIS,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1995
A 1989 law to enhance retirement benefits for appointed and elected officials in Anne Arundel County was a deliberate "grab" by those in power at the time, aides to County Executive John G. Gary said last night.They urged the County Council to approve a reform bill proposed by Mr. Gary to strip those benefits from 58 current and former employees. The bill was scheduled for a vote late last night."We're not talking about people who were in the merit system," said County Attorney Phillip Scheibe.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | September 7, 1995
Anne Arundel County Executive John G. Gary unveiled a package of proposals yesterday aimed at curbing the county's growing personnel costs, including a plan to roll back the retirement benefits of 44 current and former elected and appointed officials.The administration will introduce legislation to the County Council Sept. 18 to repeal a controversial 1989 law that substantially enhanced the pensions for political appointees and lowered the retirement age from 60 to 50 for appointees and elected officials, Mr. Gary said during a news conference in Annapolis.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | September 5, 1995
Aides to Anne Arundel County Executive John G. Gary are drafting legislation that would slash the retirement benefits for elected and appointed officials -- including those already retired.Mr. Gary will unveil the legislation, which is expected to save the county about $3 million, during a 10 a.m. press conference tomorrow, according to a high-level source within the administration.If approved by the County Council, Mr. Gary's legislation would repeal a controversial 1989 law that allowed elected and appointed officials to begin drawing pension benefits at age 50, the source said.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1995
A pension oversight group voted unanimously last night to oppose County Executive John G. Gary's plan to cut retroactively the retirement benefits of 44 current and former public officials.Deborah Turner, chairman of the Pension Oversight Commission, said the panel will recommend that the County Council reject proposed legislation that contains the plan. The commission is an appointed panel of citizens and government employees with advisory powers.The council could vote on the plan, which Mr. Gary says will save county taxpayers $4 million, on Oct. 16.The legislation would repeal a portion of a 1989 law enhancing the retirement benefits of elected and appointed officials.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | September 7, 1995
Anne Arundel County Executive John G. Gary unveiled a package of proposals yesterday aimed at curbing the county's growing personnel costs, including a plan to roll back the retirement benefits of 44 current and former elected and appointed officials.The administration will introduce legislation to the County Council Sept. 18 to repeal a controversial 1989 law that substantially enhanced the pensions for political appointees and lowered the retirement age from 60 to 50 for appointees and elected officials, Mr. Gary said during a news conference in Annapolis.
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