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NEWS
June 1, 2007
G. Taylor Watson, a retired director of applied technology at a Philadelphia arsenal whose World War II experiences took him to both theaters of that conflict, died of prostate cancer Saturday at his home in McDaniel. He was 85. Born in Perryville and raised in Delta, Pa., he went to work as a ballistics tester at Aberdeen Proving Ground after graduating from high school in 1939. He joined the Navy in 1943 and was assigned to the destroyer USS Harding as a member of its bombardment group.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
The sizzle echoed through the halls of the Center of Applied Technology North in Severn, emanating from the school's culinary arts baking and pastry lab, where it was joined by a tempting aroma. Normally, a restaurant kitchen would be responsible for such sounds and smells, but this day it was students and the Culinary Institute of America. Former staff from the Culinary Institute of America were instructing students as part of "Teaching with the CIA," a day of culinary education for Washington-area students interested in careers in the food service and hospitality industry.
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NEWS
March 28, 1995
ABERDEEN -- Towson State University will offer graduate courses leading to a master's degree in education through Harford County's Higher Education and Applied Technology (HEAT) Center, a new education and business campus near Aberdeen.The center is designed to provide a convenient location for residents in Harford and Cecil counties to earn bachelor's and master's degrees and to attract high technology businesses to the 95-acre site. Harford Community College coordinates the selection of schools for the center.
NEWS
June 1, 2007
G. Taylor Watson, a retired director of applied technology at a Philadelphia arsenal whose World War II experiences took him to both theaters of that conflict, died of prostate cancer Saturday at his home in McDaniel. He was 85. Born in Perryville and raised in Delta, Pa., he went to work as a ballistics tester at Aberdeen Proving Ground after graduating from high school in 1939. He joined the Navy in 1943 and was assigned to the destroyer USS Harding as a member of its bombardment group.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1998
In an agonizing meeting that continued into the early hours of the morning yesterday, the Anne Arundel school board managed to make only about half the $9 million in cuts needed to meet the budget the County Council approved for it.The eight-member board had no trouble agreeing to hiring freezes for custodians and central office workers, and eliminating and reducing overtime pay, but voted against making major cuts that would most directly affect students in...
BUSINESS
By TANYA JONES and TANYA JONES,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1995
Marylanders will have a chance to talk face to face with their legislators tomorrow night in the state's first video town meeting.State delegates and senators in four locations around the state will lead the meeting, where people in one room can see, hear and speak to those in three other rooms miles away using a network of video cameras, monitors, microphones and fiber-optic cable.Legislators and residents will gather in video-equipped rooms in Owings Mills, Aberdeen, Rockville and Salisbury at 7 p.m. tomorrow in a discussion on Maryland's economic development and job creation.
NEWS
By Lyn Backe and Lyn Backe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 1997
WHEN I WAS in high school a couple of generations ago, the guys learned engines and the girls learned cosmetology or office skills. And while I don't think guys were actually excluded from typing class, you certainly didn't see any of them at the desks. As if I didn't already know it, the world has changed a lot since the late 1950s, and with it, high school education. Visitors to the Annapolis Mall Wednesday through Friday can see just how much.From 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. on those days, the mall will be host to a display by the Center of Applied Technology South in Edgewater, featuring faculty, staff and students.
NEWS
By CHARLES R. BOUTIN | April 24, 1994
One of my first objectives will be to restore government by consensus to the Aberdeen City Council. I would pledge at the outset that once a vote is taken, I will support the majority view regardless of what side of the issue I was on. . . .The next issue that I think is extremely important is the water supply situation in our city. . . . I believe that this matter should be decided almost immediately so we can guarantee a continued expansion of water supply. . . .We must have a constantly expanding tax base in order to maintain the tax rate.
BUSINESS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1999
Gov. Parris N. Glendening joined Harford County and Battelle Memorial Institute officials yesterday in formally announcing construction of the company's eastern operations facility at the Higher Education and Applied Technology (HEAT) Center near Aberdeen.The $40 million Battelle center is expected to bring as many as 300 scientific and technical jobs to Harford by 2003. It will strengthen the institute's ties to Aberdeen Proving Ground, where Battelle is a subcontractor on a planned chemical weapons-disposal facility.
BUSINESS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1998
In a move to capitalize on the proximity of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Harford County officials signed a technological partnership with Army officials yesterday and welcomed the first private business to the county's Higher Education and Applied Technology (HEAT) Center.Nu-Tek Precision Optical Corp., which makes optical components and offers engineering and consulting services, will move its 17 employees from Belcamp to the 152-acre research and development park and campus near Aberdeen.And yesterday's signing of a charter setting up the Aberdeen Proving Ground Science and Technology Board at the HEAT Center will promote the sharing of resources between APG and the private sector, officials said.
NEWS
By Arthur Fletcher | November 3, 2003
JUST BELOW the surface of the national debate over the decline in U.S. manufacturing, a dangerous notion is taking hold: Some economists are beginning to argue that America has entered a post-industrial age. Forget about manufacturing, they say, and concentrate resources on the knowledge and service sectors. But such views ignore our economy's critical dependence on manufacturing productivity as its engine for economic growth. Manufactured goods have always been the vital center of our nation's trade and prosperity.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2003
PORT DEPOSIT - Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. endorsed yesterday a plan by a team of developers to convert a big chunk of the former Bainbridge Naval Training Center into an applied technology park that is expected to create 3,000 jobs. "We are buying into this project," Ehrlich said of a plan to devote 500 of the 1,200 acres of Bainbridge in Cecil County to Berkshire Laboratories Inc., a small and little-known Columbus, Ohio, company that claims to have patents on technology that could revolutionize a number of industries.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2003
Cecil County is not the only jurisdiction seeking to accommodate Berkshire Laboratories Inc. and its plans for a 500-acre applied technology park, employing up to 3,000 workers. Officials of Greene County, Va., are working on an incentive package that they hope will prompt Berkshire officials to choose one of several sites near Charlottesville, Va. "We are working on an incentive package," said Kenneth W. Lawson, chairman of the Greene County Board of Supervisors. "We're working with the economic development office and the County Planning Department, in an effort to enhance our chances of winning."
NEWS
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 27, 2002
Aberdeen always has been a company town. Established in the mid-1800s and named in honor of an influential railroad man's native home of Aberdeen, Scotland, it first made a name for itself when the U.S. Army established the Aberdeen Proving Ground in 1917, six months after the United States entered World War I. The town's proximity to roads, shipping and railways made it an ideal place for a military facility. As a center for military testing, research and training, the post is the Army's oldest active proving ground and the largest employer in Harford County.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1999
Sheena Conner spent most of yesterday in the kitchen -- chopping beets and spinach in the morning, working on an ice carving in the afternoon, then making pasta dough.Last night, the 15-year-old culinary arts student was expertly threading the freshly made pasta through a noodle maker at the annual open house of her high school, Anne Arundel's Center For Applied Technology (CAT) North in Severn."I love this program," said Conner, a junior who plans to attend the Pennsylvania Culinary College in Pittsburgh.
BUSINESS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1999
Gov. Parris N. Glendening joined Harford County and Battelle Memorial Institute officials yesterday in formally announcing construction of the company's eastern operations facility at the Higher Education and Applied Technology (HEAT) Center near Aberdeen.The $40 million Battelle center is expected to bring as many as 300 scientific and technical jobs to Harford by 2003. It will strengthen the institute's ties to Aberdeen Proving Ground, where Battelle is a subcontractor on a planned chemical weapons-disposal facility.
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Special to The Sun | March 12, 1995
A recent marriage of business and education in Harford County is expected to help attract high technology businesses to a new 95-acre office complex not far from Aberdeen Proving Ground.At the same time, it will bring greater opportunities to earn college degrees closer to home for Harford residents."We want to meet the pent-up demand for baccalaureate and graduate study in this part of the state," said W. Stephen Pannill, interim president of Harford Community College.Beginning in the fall, several Baltimore-area colleges and universities, in conjunction with Harford Community College, will bring programs in business administration, engineering and education to a 12-acre campus that is part of the new Higher Education and Applied Technology (HEAT)
NEWS
By Arthur Fletcher | November 3, 2003
JUST BELOW the surface of the national debate over the decline in U.S. manufacturing, a dangerous notion is taking hold: Some economists are beginning to argue that America has entered a post-industrial age. Forget about manufacturing, they say, and concentrate resources on the knowledge and service sectors. But such views ignore our economy's critical dependence on manufacturing productivity as its engine for economic growth. Manufactured goods have always been the vital center of our nation's trade and prosperity.
BUSINESS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1999
Battelle Memorial Institute, an Ohio-based high-technology employer, will open a $40 million operations center near Aberdeen, expected to bring as many as 300 scientific and technical jobs to Harford County by 2003, Battelle confirmed yesterday.The move -- to be announced in Harford County today by Gov. Parris N. Glendening, along with county and Battelle officials -- will tighten Battelle's ties with Aberdeen Proving Ground, where the company is a subcontractor."Our businesses are closely tied to Aberdeen Proving Ground," said Katy Delaney, a spokeswoman for Battelle.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1998
In an agonizing meeting that continued into the early hours of the morning yesterday, the Anne Arundel school board managed to make only about half the $9 million in cuts needed to meet the budget the County Council approved for it.The eight-member board had no trouble agreeing to hiring freezes for custodians and central office workers, and eliminating and reducing overtime pay, but voted against making major cuts that would most directly affect students in...
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