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By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | February 25, 1993
Police arrested seven peace activists, including Philip F. Berrigan, at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory yesterday during a demonstration in which ashes were spread on the grounds to symbolize destruction from nuclear weapons.The protesters, all members of the Baltimore Emergency Response Network (BERN), were arrested about 8 a.m. yesterday when 15 members blocked an employee gate at the 365-acre site in Columbia, police said. Besides trespassing to spread ashes on the sidewalks and grounds, police said, the protesters distributed and posted leaflets.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
Robert A. Makofski, a retired Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory scientist and administrator who headed Howard County General Hospital's board, died of cancer Dec. 25 at Pen Bay Medical Center in Rockport, Maine. The former Columbia resident was 81. Born in Wanamie, Pa., he was the son of a coal mine fireman and a homemaker. "His father would not let him visit the coal mine until he had graduated college," said his wife, the former Cathy Lickteig. "His father did not want him to work in the mines.
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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | December 31, 1990
Gary L. Smith has been named associate director of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory near Columbia, a high-technology job that may have him involved in submarine warfare one day and medical science the next.He assumes his new post tomorrow, succeeding James E. Colvard, who is retiring as the No. 2 person at the research center, which historically ranks among the nation's research institutions receiving the most funding from the federal government. During 1989, the laboratory received research grants totaling $392 million.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater | November 15, 2012
When Elsayed Talaat first began working at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory as a postdoctoral fellow, he was assigned to a project exploring Earth's atmosphere. That was 1999. To this day, he's still dedicated to the TIMED mission, analyzing the findings of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics spacecraft, a 1,300-pound instrument built at APL that has been orbiting Earth since 2001. Talaat's expertise makes him a fitting candidate to share the mission with the public through a new lecture series Beyond Earth presented by APL scientists at Columbia's Robinson Nature Center.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 6, 2001
A United Church of Christ minister who was protesting weapons research outside the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in North Laurel yesterday was arrested and charged with trespassing. John Dyer Oliver, 54, of the 2000 block of N. Norhurst Way in Catonsville, was one of eight people, all members of Baltimore Emergency Response Network (BERN), who were protesting on the sidewalk outside the building about 12:30 p.m. The activists carried signs protesting weapons in space and sang songs, according to one protester.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | October 11, 1994
Five peace activists were charged with trespassing yesterday at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory near Columbia, Howard County police said.Demonstrators -- members of the Baltimore Emergency Response Network (BERN) -- were handing out leaflets protesting the facility's weapons research and refused to leave the grounds about 10 a.m. when asked to by laboratory officials, police said. The lab is in the 11100 block of Johns Hopkins Road.Police said that several protesters did comply with the officials' request.
NEWS
June 11, 2001
Hopkins laboratory in N. Laurel makes two appointments Eric Bohn, of Columbia, has been named laboratory chief information officer of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in North Laurel. Dave Kalbaugh has been appointed assistant director of programs. He was head of the laboratory's Power Projection Systems Department. Union Memorial names operations vice president Nancy Butler, R.N., has been named vice president of operations at Union Memorial Hospital. The Ellicott City resident previously served as vice president of Ambulatory Services for the Baltimore division of MedStar Health.
NEWS
March 14, 2007
Groundbreaking held at Applied Physics Lab Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, county officials and representatives from the construction industry met Friday to break ground for a new building at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in North Laurel. The $62 million, 261,600-square-foot building is scheduled to open in 2009. It will house about 500 of the laboratory's staff members and will replace obsolete facilities in older buildings. The new facilities are to include research laboratories, a mission operations center at which three space missions can be commanded at one time, and modeling and simulation facilities for the Navy's next generation missile combat systems.
NEWS
February 9, 2004
Russell Gingras appointed APL's new chief of staff Russell E. Gingras of Columbia has been named chief of staff at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory in North Laurel. He is chief adviser to the laboratory's director, Richard T. Roca. Gingras joined APL in 1969, after earning a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois. He spent 13 years analyzing the effectiveness of electronic countermeasures against military systems. In 1982, he became a supervisor in the Naval Warfare Analysis Department, conducting studies of advanced system concepts for the Navy.
NEWS
February 26, 2004
Mary Anna Sutch Polk, a retired elementary school teacher, died Sunday of congestive heart failure at Blakehurst Life Care Community in Towson, where she had lived for the past four years. She was 88 and a former resident of The Orchards in North Baltimore. Born Mary Anna Sutch in Granite, she was a graduate of Western High School and earned a degree from what is now Towson University. She later earned a master's degree from Loyola College. Mrs. Polk taught in city elementary schools for six years and from 1956 through 1972 at Bryn Mawr School, in kindergarten and elementary subjects.
EXPLORE
By Lane Page | January 30, 2012
The opening scene went something like this: Setting: Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab building 17 cafeteria -- Fall 2009 Rocket Scientist #1: I do community theater. Rocket Scientist #2: I almost minored in theater in college. Rocket Scientist #1: Really? We should start a drama club here. Rocket Scientist #2: I'm in. Rocket Scientist #1: OK, good. For Big Science types at APL, tilting too far to their logical, self-controlled left brains could be hazardous. But that's less of an issue since the curtain was raised on the APL Drama Club by mission designer Chris Dong and fellow space department member Dawn Moessner, a mission design analyst.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2011
Alvin Ralph Eaton, a pioneer in modern guided missile systems and the longest-serving employee at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, died of cancer Oct. 20. He was 91 and lived in Clarksville. Mr. Eaton's 66-year career coincided with — and he contributed to — historic developments in U.S. missile defense. He corrected flight problems in the first supersonic surface-to-air missiles, developed a widely used tail-control system for supersonic interceptor missiles, and helped shepherd the Patriot anti-missile program in the 1980s.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
Andrew A. "Andy" Dantzler, an optical engineer who was program area manager for civilian space at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, died Thursday of cardiac arrest at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The longtime Sykesville resident was 49. The son of a federal government worker and a counselor, Andrew A. Dantzler was born in Bethesda and raised in Rockville, where he graduated in 1980 from Robert E. Peary High School. After earning a bachelor's degree in astronomy and physics in 1984 from the University of Maryland, College Park, he went to work as an optical engineer at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2010
Johns Hopkins again led all U.S. universities in research and development spending in 2009, according to rankings released Wednesday by the National Science Foundation. Johns Hopkins again led all U.S. universities in research and development spending in 2009, according to rankings released Wednesday by the National Science Foundation. With $1.85 billion in spending on medical, science and engineering research, Hopkins far outpaced second-place University of Michigan's total of $1 billion.
NEWS
March 14, 2007
Groundbreaking held at Applied Physics Lab Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, county officials and representatives from the construction industry met Friday to break ground for a new building at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in North Laurel. The $62 million, 261,600-square-foot building is scheduled to open in 2009. It will house about 500 of the laboratory's staff members and will replace obsolete facilities in older buildings. The new facilities are to include research laboratories, a mission operations center at which three space missions can be commanded at one time, and modeling and simulation facilities for the Navy's next generation missile combat systems.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2004
As he watched years of sweat and effort disappear into the night sky atop a trail of fire almost 800 miles away, Karl Fielhauer shouted at his video screen. "C'mon baby, burn!" he yelled as Messenger, the first mission to the planet Mercury in 31 years. blasted off from Cape Canaveral in Florida. The on-time liftoff of NASA's $426 million Messenger spacecraft early yesterday was greeted by whoops and cheers from Fielhauer -- the mission's lead radio engineer -- and dozens of colleagues in the mission control center at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab near Laurel.
NEWS
May 17, 1995
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory sent pink slips yesterday to 158 of its full-time staff members, about 40 fewer than officials at the research facility near Laurel originally thought would be necessary to meet their budget goals.Last week, 100 layoff notices went out to temporary contract employees.That also was 40 fewer positions than the APL had originally said would be cut.In March, the APL had estimated 350 of its 2,750 staff employees and 700 contract workers would lose their jobs.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Department of DefenseStaff Writer | April 8, 1992
The Pentagon spent less money in Maryland last year on equipment -- such as radars for the F-16 fighter plane and electronics for the Patriot missile -- but wrote bigger paychecks to cover the salaries of military and civilian personnel in the state, according to a Department of Defense study.Overall, Maryland apparently fared pretty well in the Pentagon budget battle. For the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30, 1991, the report notes, the Defense Department pumped $7.4 billion into Maryland's economy, up from $7.21 billion the previous year.
NEWS
February 26, 2004
Mary Anna Sutch Polk, a retired elementary school teacher, died Sunday of congestive heart failure at Blakehurst Life Care Community in Towson, where she had lived for the past four years. She was 88 and a former resident of The Orchards in North Baltimore. Born Mary Anna Sutch in Granite, she was a graduate of Western High School and earned a degree from what is now Towson University. She later earned a master's degree from Loyola College. Mrs. Polk taught in city elementary schools for six years and from 1956 through 1972 at Bryn Mawr School, in kindergarten and elementary subjects.
NEWS
February 9, 2004
Russell Gingras appointed APL's new chief of staff Russell E. Gingras of Columbia has been named chief of staff at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory in North Laurel. He is chief adviser to the laboratory's director, Richard T. Roca. Gingras joined APL in 1969, after earning a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois. He spent 13 years analyzing the effectiveness of electronic countermeasures against military systems. In 1982, he became a supervisor in the Naval Warfare Analysis Department, conducting studies of advanced system concepts for the Navy.
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