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By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | January 21, 1993
The Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory near Laurel said yesterday that it would eliminate about 80 jobs ++ in its engineering and fabrication branch within a month.Yesterday's announcement followed work-force reductions of similar magnitude over the past three months as the nation's largest defense research lab connected to a university adjusted to drops in Pentagon spending.The cuts will be across the board, said Helen Worth, a spokeswoman for the research center, commonly known as APL. She said the cuts would affect secretaries, administrators, engineers, technicians and other positions.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
Robert A. Makofski, a retired Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory scientist and administrator who headed Howard County General Hospital's board, died of cancer Dec. 25 at Pen Bay Medical Center in Rockport, Maine. The former Columbia resident was 81. Born in Wanamie, Pa., he was the son of a coal mine fireman and a homemaker. "His father would not let him visit the coal mine until he had graduated college," said his wife, the former Cathy Lickteig. "His father did not want him to work in the mines.
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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | February 13, 1991
When it comes to Maryland contributions to the nation's military might, the John Hopkins University has to rank up there with Westinghouse, which developed the first radar, and the old Glenn L. Martin Co., which produced the B-26 Marauder bomber at Middle River.At the same time Westinghouse engineers at a plant off Wilkens Avenue were developing a radar that detected the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 -- a warning that went unheeded -- a group of scientists was working at an abandoned auto agency in Silver Spring on another top-secret project -- a proximity fuse that would greatly increase the effectiveness of anti-aircraft fire.
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By Jennifer Broadwater | November 15, 2012
When Elsayed Talaat first began working at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory as a postdoctoral fellow, he was assigned to a project exploring Earth's atmosphere. That was 1999. To this day, he's still dedicated to the TIMED mission, analyzing the findings of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics spacecraft, a 1,300-pound instrument built at APL that has been orbiting Earth since 2001. Talaat's expertise makes him a fitting candidate to share the mission with the public through a new lecture series Beyond Earth presented by APL scientists at Columbia's Robinson Nature Center.
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By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1999
After seven years as director of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in North Laurel, Gary L. Smith will resign this spring to accept a top job at the CIA.Smith, 63, of Ellicott City will become deputy director for science and technology, reporting to CIA Director George Tenet."
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By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1995
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) -- Howard County's largest private employer -- expects a $46.2 million cutback in its Navy contract this fiscal year, forcing new austerity measures five months after it laid off 258 workers because of earlier cuts.To prepare for the projected cutback, officials at the 365-acre facility near Laurel have instituted sick-leave reduction and energy conservation but say they do not expect more layoffs."At this point, there is nothing that [APL officials]
NEWS
February 26, 2001
Applied Physics Lab gains recognition from black engineers The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory has won the 2001 Pre-College Program of the Year Award of the National Society of Black Engineers for its Maryland MESA Program. The MESA (Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement) Program prepares girls and minorities in elementary, middle and high school to enter college and study technical subjects. Tutorials, counseling, field trips, incentive awards, science fairs and computer training are offered.
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By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | October 22, 1990
The Johns Hopkins University School of Engineering has opened a satellite school and research lab near Baltimore-Washington International Airport to help train professionals working in area high-tech industries.The school, which awards more engineering master's degrees than all but one program in the nation, has moved classrooms and a state-of-the-art microwave engineering lab to the Dorsey Center, in the Dorsey Business Park.Hopkins had offered engineering classes in the nearby Parkway Center.
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By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2001
Maryland scientists launched a mission yesterday to probe one of the last mysterious realms of Earth's atmosphere. After nearly two years of delay, the $193 million TIMED spacecraft soared into space. The satellite - designed, built and operated for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory - will spend the next two years mapping parts of the mesosphere, thermosphere and ionosphere. This region, which extends from 40 to 110 miles above Earth's surface, is one of the least explored and most poorly understood parts of the atmosphere.
NEWS
June 16, 1997
Joseph W. Wilding, 63, budget supervisorJoseph W. Wilding, a retired budget supervisor with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, died Wednesday after suffering a heart attack while playing softball in Bowie. He was 63.Born and raised in Washington, he graduated from St. Anselm's Abbey School in 1951 and Georgetown University in 1955 with a degree in economics.He worked briefly at the National Security Trust Co. in Washington before joining the Navy in 1956. He left the military in 1959 after working as a communications officer on the staff of the 6th Fleet.
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By Lane Page | January 30, 2012
The opening scene went something like this: Setting: Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab building 17 cafeteria -- Fall 2009 Rocket Scientist #1: I do community theater. Rocket Scientist #2: I almost minored in theater in college. Rocket Scientist #1: Really? We should start a drama club here. Rocket Scientist #2: I'm in. Rocket Scientist #1: OK, good. For Big Science types at APL, tilting too far to their logical, self-controlled left brains could be hazardous. But that's less of an issue since the curtain was raised on the APL Drama Club by mission designer Chris Dong and fellow space department member Dawn Moessner, a mission design analyst.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2012
Albert C. Reymann, a retired Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory mechanical engineer who led a team that helped create the forerunner of the global navigation and positioning systems in use today, died Monday of heart disease at Gilchrist Center Howard County. The longtime Catonsville resident was 85. Born in Baltimore and raised on Homestead Street near Clifton Park, he was the son of Hildebert Reymann, a Revere Copper and Brass supervisor, and Helen Reymann, a homemaker. He attended St. Bernard School and was a 1944 Polytechnic Institute graduate.
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November 29, 2011
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory dedicated a new building in November on its South Campus. The five-story, 200,000-square-foot glass, brick and steel structure on 35 acres provides an array of modern offices, laboratories and conference areas. Designed with green features such as a reflective roof and energy-saver lighting, Building 200 houses scientists, engineers and support staff from APL's Space Department, who advance the knowledge of the space environment and the planets in the solar system, and address many other challenges faced by NASA and the Department of Defense, the primary sponsors of APL's space research.
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By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2011
Alvin Ralph Eaton, a pioneer in modern guided missile systems and the longest-serving employee at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, died of cancer Oct. 20. He was 91 and lived in Clarksville. Mr. Eaton's 66-year career coincided with — and he contributed to — historic developments in U.S. missile defense. He corrected flight problems in the first supersonic surface-to-air missiles, developed a widely used tail-control system for supersonic interceptor missiles, and helped shepherd the Patriot anti-missile program in the 1980s.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
Andrew A. "Andy" Dantzler, an optical engineer who was program area manager for civilian space at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, died Thursday of cardiac arrest at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The longtime Sykesville resident was 49. The son of a federal government worker and a counselor, Andrew A. Dantzler was born in Bethesda and raised in Rockville, where he graduated in 1980 from Robert E. Peary High School. After earning a bachelor's degree in astronomy and physics in 1984 from the University of Maryland, College Park, he went to work as an optical engineer at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt.
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By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2011
Images from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter appear to reveal evidence of liquid water running downhill during the Martian summer. But a device on the orbiter called CRISM, built by scientists at Johns Hopkins' Applied Physics Lab, scanned the stains and found no sign of water. A report in the journal Science Thursday said the MRO team's best guess is that the stains, which lengthen and darken in summer and vanish in winter, are caused by a syrupy brine that dries quickly on the surface.
NEWS
September 18, 2005
Public forum to discuss farmland preservation The League of Women Voters of Howard County will sponsor a public forum to discuss Howard County's Agricultural Preservation Program from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Banneker Room of the George Howard Building, 3430 Court House Drive, Ellicott City. A panel discussion will focus on the preservation policies and goals of Howard County's general plan, and compare achievements with the plan's goals. Pressures to develop land in the county and the viability of farming and preservation will be discussed.
NEWS
April 9, 2008
Columbia General Manager Greg Hamm and the General Growth Properties team invite the community to the fourth in a series of forums featuring members of the design and planning team working on the master plan for Columbia Town Center. "An Evening with Jaquelin T. Robertson" features the former dean of the School of Architecture at the University of Virginia and founding partner of Cooper, Robertson & Partners. He led work on projects such as new communities at Daniel Island, S.C.; New Albany, Ohio; and Celebration and WaterColor, Florida.
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By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
Only three months after NASA's Messenger spacecraft became the first to orbit the planet Mercury, scientists are already tossing out some long-held ideas about the place, and wondering at some surprising and unexpected discoveries. "In many cases, a lot of our original ideas about Mercury were just plain wrong," said Larry Nittler, a Messenger scientist from the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Among the surprises from the Maryland-run mission: • Mercury has unexpectedly high abundances of potassium and thorium — elements that scientists thought would have evaporated as the planet formed so close to the young sun. Now they'll need a new theory of how (and where)
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By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2011
Fifteen years of planning and 61/2 years of maneuvering in space will all come down to the crunch Thursday evening as mission managers in Maryland try to slip NASA's Messenger spacecraft into orbit around Mercury. The braking maneuver, playing out 96 million miles from Earth, will have to slow the desk-size planetary probe by 1,929 mph and ease it into a polar orbit around the planet closest to the sun. Failure will leave Messenger's managers at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab near Laurel with less than 10 percent of the fuel the craft left Earth with, and limited options for recovery.
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