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NEWS
By Mary Ellen Graybill and Mary Ellen Graybill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 7, 2004
If you always wished to catch a glimpse of Santa's reindeer up close before they land on the slate roof of a Whiteford house on Christmas Eve, you may be in luck. Just 20 minutes north of Bel Air, nestled in the rolling hills of Whiteford and open for the Christmas season, is a 100-acre farm with a reindeer village on the Pennsylvania end of the property. Sassy, Molly, Minnie and a baby named C.J. romp and play to the delight of schoolchildren taken on tours by farmer Brian Adelhardt. On Dec. 5, Santa will stop at the reindeer corral before he visits 1,500 homes a second, at an average sleigh speed of 3.6 million mph, while carrying about 156,000 tons of cargo, according to "Santa Claus: Ergonomic Risk Assessment" from the System Concepts Web site.
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NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | December 30, 2007
It's an after-Christmas tradition for the Adelhardt family, who open their 100-acre Whiteford farm to the public to view the livestock that is forbidden in Maryland: the reindeer. Since Maryland law bans deer of any kind kept captive, Brian Adelhardt keeps his three reindeer north of the Mason-Dixon Line - seven acres of his farm are in Pennsylvania. "Reindeer is the biggest attraction here at Christmas time," he said. "On a normal weekend, when we walk along the parking lot, we get a lot of cars from Virginia.
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NEWS
November 19, 2006
Applewood Farm will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekends from Saturday through Dec. 17 at 4435 Prospect Road in Whiteford. A highlight of the farm is a herd of reindeer descended directly from the original Alaskan herd established at Teller, Alaska, in 1898. Reindeer educational programs will be conducted by reindeer breeder and farm owner Brian Adelhardt at 10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. weekends. An After Christmas Reindeer Day will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 27 with live reindeer programs at noon and 2 p.m. The rain date is Dec. 28. Reindeer Village includes two males, one born in spring 2004, and two females; a 1773 log barn with a display of lights and greens; eight model train displays; Santa's workshop; a gift shop and refreshments; a petting zoo; hayrides to the Christmas tree fields and the children's maze; snowball bowling; and a reindeer antler toss.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Tyeesha Dixon and Hanah Cho and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporters | December 24, 2006
Christmas is important for many businesses. But for some, it's everything. Many seasonal entrepreneurs risk much of their profit or loss on the final month of the year. For them, the difference between a good year and a bad one can be washed out by a single wet weekend, small December crowds or fickle consumers who decide to spend their disposable holiday income elsewhere. "Overall, the pressures are tremendous," said Asher Epstein, managing director of the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2002
WHITEFORD - Brian Adelhardt's seven reindeer are grounded this year. His Applewood Farm - 100 acres straddling the Mason-Dixon Line in Harford County and southern Pennsylvania - planned to provide animals for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's holiday pops concerts, for the Harford Mall, for the town of Oakland's Christmas parade. Instead, they are staying home - on the Pennsylvania part of Adelhardt's property because reindeer are not allowed to live in Maryland - and receiving school groups and other visitors.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Tyeesha Dixon and Hanah Cho and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporters | December 24, 2006
Christmas is important for many businesses. But for some, it's everything. Many seasonal entrepreneurs risk much of their profit or loss on the final month of the year. For them, the difference between a good year and a bad one can be washed out by a single wet weekend, small December crowds or fickle consumers who decide to spend their disposable holiday income elsewhere. "Overall, the pressures are tremendous," said Asher Epstein, managing director of the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | December 30, 2007
It's an after-Christmas tradition for the Adelhardt family, who open their 100-acre Whiteford farm to the public to view the livestock that is forbidden in Maryland: the reindeer. Since Maryland law bans deer of any kind kept captive, Brian Adelhardt keeps his three reindeer north of the Mason-Dixon Line - seven acres of his farm are in Pennsylvania. "Reindeer is the biggest attraction here at Christmas time," he said. "On a normal weekend, when we walk along the parking lot, we get a lot of cars from Virginia.
NEWS
July 29, 2007
Friends of Harford event was a success Old friends met new friends at Applewood Farm on Sunday, [July 22] as more than 800 people attended Friends on the Farm Day, the first annual public event put on by Friends of Harford. Thanks to Bonnie Hummer, our event coordinator, and FOH's hardworking Outreach Committee. It was a great success all around. From the baby reindeer, Millie, to the train ride around the grounds of Pat and Brian Adelhardt's unique farm, from environmental and land conservation exhibitors to local vendors and a fabulous band, there was plenty to see and do. FOH thanks our exhibitors, vendors, sponsors and supporters for making this such a fun day. And most of all, we thank our citizens who came out to enjoy the activities, learn more about responsible land use, and meet other Friends of Harford.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | October 3, 2011
When most people think of Halloween, images of pumpkins, witches and ghosts usually come to mind. Whether you like to be scared senseless in a haunted house, learn more about true ghost stories or prefer a simple hayride on the farm to pick out pumpkins, there is plenty of fun to be had in Harford County this fall for all ages. For the scariest Halloween fun, be sure to check out Legends of the Fog - Harford County's largest haunted attraction. Located on about 80 acres of Aldino Sod Farm in Aberdeen, Legends of the Fog is open on weekends in October through the first weekend in November.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2008
Charles St. Clair Sr. has been growing Christmas trees since World War II. He began the business not only to meet the demand for local trees, but also because he enjoys being a part of the tradition of finding a tree, he said. "I like the camaraderie and joy people have when they come to get a Christmas tree," said St. Clair, 85. But now it takes more than camaraderie and trees to draw customers. With surging artificial tree sales and roadside tree stands popping up all over the county, local farmers are being forced to diversify.
NEWS
November 19, 2006
Applewood Farm will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekends from Saturday through Dec. 17 at 4435 Prospect Road in Whiteford. A highlight of the farm is a herd of reindeer descended directly from the original Alaskan herd established at Teller, Alaska, in 1898. Reindeer educational programs will be conducted by reindeer breeder and farm owner Brian Adelhardt at 10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. weekends. An After Christmas Reindeer Day will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 27 with live reindeer programs at noon and 2 p.m. The rain date is Dec. 28. Reindeer Village includes two males, one born in spring 2004, and two females; a 1773 log barn with a display of lights and greens; eight model train displays; Santa's workshop; a gift shop and refreshments; a petting zoo; hayrides to the Christmas tree fields and the children's maze; snowball bowling; and a reindeer antler toss.
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Graybill and Mary Ellen Graybill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 7, 2004
If you always wished to catch a glimpse of Santa's reindeer up close before they land on the slate roof of a Whiteford house on Christmas Eve, you may be in luck. Just 20 minutes north of Bel Air, nestled in the rolling hills of Whiteford and open for the Christmas season, is a 100-acre farm with a reindeer village on the Pennsylvania end of the property. Sassy, Molly, Minnie and a baby named C.J. romp and play to the delight of schoolchildren taken on tours by farmer Brian Adelhardt. On Dec. 5, Santa will stop at the reindeer corral before he visits 1,500 homes a second, at an average sleigh speed of 3.6 million mph, while carrying about 156,000 tons of cargo, according to "Santa Claus: Ergonomic Risk Assessment" from the System Concepts Web site.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2002
WHITEFORD - Brian Adelhardt's seven reindeer are grounded this year. His Applewood Farm - 100 acres straddling the Mason-Dixon Line in Harford County and southern Pennsylvania - planned to provide animals for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's holiday pops concerts, for the Harford Mall, for the town of Oakland's Christmas parade. Instead, they are staying home - on the Pennsylvania part of Adelhardt's property because reindeer are not allowed to live in Maryland - and receiving school groups and other visitors.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2008
It's time to pile into the car, head to a farm and pick out a Christmas tree. There are an abundance of places near Baltimore to find the perfect pine, fir or spruce - some organic, some already cut and some you can cut yourself. Some places also offer seasonal food, crafts and tractor rides. A few spots are offering discounts, matching last year's prices or posting coupons on their Web sites. Here's a partial list, researched by Rebecca Hyler, a features producer at baltimoresun.com, with help from the Maryland Department of Agriculture (mda.
FEATURES
By NICK BROWN and NICK BROWN,SUN REPORTER | October 15, 2005
Tired of leaving Halloween decorating until the last minute, only to find a few grungy -- or worse, mushy -- pumpkins left at your local supermarket? Get a jump on it this time around -- and make a day of it with a visit to an area pumpkin patch. This weekend and next are the best for pumpkin-picking. The squash are ripe and ready to be made into jack-o-lanterns, and while you're picking one out, you can also enjoy other fall activities at farms across Maryland. Paint your pumpkins -- or your faces; go on hayrides; build scarecrows; snake your way through mazes -- it's more than just produce-picking.
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