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NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR and BARRY RASCOVAR,Barry Rascovar is editorial page director of The Sun | February 16, 1992
Wally Appleseed has been at it now for more than two years, preaching his "trees are good" gospel to the heathens. And he has turned many in his audience into converts.During this brief span of time, more than 2.5 million baby trees have been planted in Maryland under his guidance, an achievement that only future generations will fully appreciate.The best part is that Wally Appleseed has accomplished this without bankrupting the public coffers. In fact, he is a prime example of how some government programs can be run inexpensively and yet still produce tremendous results.
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BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2005
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield has no legal obligation to make contributions to community organizations, Washington's insurance commissioner ruled yesterday. Its legal responsibility is to its members, although the insurer "can and should engage in more charitable activity," Lawrence H. Mirel, the insurance commissioner for the District of Columbia, said in a report yesterday. Mirel directed the nonprofit regional health insurer to file a report by September cataloging its charitable efforts.
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BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2003
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield is worth $2.27 billion - nearly $1 billion more than the sale price CareFirst negotiated for itself - according to a report to be released today by DC Appleseed, an advocacy group. The Appleseed valuation, prepared by Harvard Business School professor Richard F. Meyer, is about a half-billion dollars higher than those done by investment bankers hired by the insurance commissioners of Maryland and the District of Columbia. Details of the report were not available yesterday, and officials from DC Appleseed could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2004
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield should be spending between $50 million and $100 million a year on community services in the nation's capital - compared with a projected $1 million this year - to meet its obligations as a nonprofit insurer, a Washington-based advocacy group contends in a report to be released today. CareFirst "has an obligation to serve the community - a charitable obligation - and we don't think it's meeting its charitable obligation," said Walter A. Smith, executive director of the DC Appleseed Center For Law and Justice, a decade-old public-interest organization that has been pushing for CareFirst reforms, and which commissioned the report.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2002
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield and WellPoint Health Networks Inc. refiled in Delaware yesterday their application for approval of WellPoint's plan to buy CareFirst, restarting the review process there. The review in the District of Columbia, however, could be pushed back, as the companies debate with the D.C. Appleseed Center, a public interest group, about information Appleseed says it needs. Maryland's review is on schedule for a decision early next year, Debbie Rosen McKerrow, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Insurance Administration, said yesterday.
NEWS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2004
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield should be spending between $50 million and $100 million a year on community services in the nation's capital - compared with a projected $1 million this year - to meet its obligations as a nonprofit insurer, a Washington-based advocacy group contends in a report to be released today. CareFirst "has an obligation to serve the community - a charitable obligation - and we don't think it's meeting its charitable obligation," said Walter A. Smith, executive director of the DC Appleseed Center For Law and Justice, a decade-old public-interest organization that has been pushing for CareFirst reforms, and which commissioned the report.
NEWS
April 21, 1998
FireSykesville: Firefighters responded to a wash detail at 5: 15 p.m. Friday at Routes 26 and 32. Units were out 15 minutes.Sykesville: Firefighters responded to a fire alarm at 2: 18 a.m. Saturday in the 1000 block of Johnsville Road. Units were out 30 minutes.Gamber: Firefighters responded to an open 911 line at 11: 20 a.m. Saturday in the 2700 block of Appleseed Road. Units were out 13 minutes.Sykesville: Firefighters responded to a child locked in a car at 12: 09 p.m. Saturday in the 7100 block of Brangels Road.
NEWS
September 27, 1998
Prayer events to be held in Westminster, TaneytownThe seventh annual Carroll County Life Chain Hour of Prayer will be held in Westminster and Taneytown on Oct. 4.The Life Chain is a peaceful stand of solidarity by Carroll residents who oppose abortion.The chain will form from 1: 30 p.m. to 2: 30 p.m. at Routes 140 and 97 in Westminster and from 2: 30 p.m. to 3: 30 p.m. at Baltimore and York streets in Taneytown.Signs will be passed out at both locations 15 minutes before start time.Information: Taneytown, 410-751-1712; Westminster, 410-876-6547.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2003
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield could do a much better job of providing community service in the nation's capital, a Washington social-interest watchdog group contends in a report released yesterday that adds to the debate over the future of the region's dominant health insurance provider. The report by scholars at George Washington and Georgetown Universities for the D.C. Appleseed Center for Law and Justice argued that the nonprofit insurer often fails to address health problems for the needy.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2005
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield has no legal obligation to make contributions to community organizations, Washington's insurance commissioner ruled yesterday. Its legal responsibility is to its members, although the insurer "can and should engage in more charitable activity," Lawrence H. Mirel, the insurance commissioner for the District of Columbia, said in a report yesterday. Mirel directed the nonprofit regional health insurer to file a report by September cataloging its charitable efforts.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2003
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield could do a much better job of providing community service in the nation's capital, a Washington social-interest watchdog group contends in a report released yesterday that adds to the debate over the future of the region's dominant health insurance provider. The report by scholars at George Washington and Georgetown Universities for the D.C. Appleseed Center for Law and Justice argued that the nonprofit insurer often fails to address health problems for the needy.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2003
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield is worth $2.27 billion - nearly $1 billion more than the sale price CareFirst negotiated for itself - according to a report to be released today by DC Appleseed, an advocacy group. The Appleseed valuation, prepared by Harvard Business School professor Richard F. Meyer, is about a half-billion dollars higher than those done by investment bankers hired by the insurance commissioners of Maryland and the District of Columbia. Details of the report were not available yesterday, and officials from DC Appleseed could not be reached for comment.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2002
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield and WellPoint Health Networks Inc. refiled in Delaware yesterday their application for approval of WellPoint's plan to buy CareFirst, restarting the review process there. The review in the District of Columbia, however, could be pushed back, as the companies debate with the D.C. Appleseed Center, a public interest group, about information Appleseed says it needs. Maryland's review is on schedule for a decision early next year, Debbie Rosen McKerrow, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Insurance Administration, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Jeff Holland and Jeff Holland,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 12, 1999
LET'S GET environmental here, now that spring is busting out all over.At 1 p.m. Wednesday, volunteers will plant a heritage fruit tree orchard at Historic London Town and Gardens. The orchard will commemorate John Chapman, better known as Johnny Appleseed, the legendary figure famous for roaming across the United States planting apple trees.For this event, Greg Stiverson, London Town's executive director, has teamed with Don Riddle, of Homestead Gardens in Davidsonville, and Jeff Meyer, of American Forests, the country's oldest nonprofit conservation organization.
NEWS
September 27, 1998
Prayer events to be held in Westminster, TaneytownThe seventh annual Carroll County Life Chain Hour of Prayer will be held in Westminster and Taneytown on Oct. 4.The Life Chain is a peaceful stand of solidarity by Carroll residents who oppose abortion.The chain will form from 1: 30 p.m. to 2: 30 p.m. at Routes 140 and 97 in Westminster and from 2: 30 p.m. to 3: 30 p.m. at Baltimore and York streets in Taneytown.Signs will be passed out at both locations 15 minutes before start time.Information: Taneytown, 410-751-1712; Westminster, 410-876-6547.
NEWS
By COLMAN MCCARTHY | May 31, 1998
AT THE 40th reunion of Harvard Law School's class of 1958, held on a recent weekend in Boston, the expected displays of conventional success were on full and gilded view. These were senior partners at major corporate law firms, federal judges, old-hand loophole lawyers and fixers, and the settled and secure usually found in the novels of Louis Auchincloss.That would have been it, except that this group had a collective achievement that went well beyond the soarings of any individual alumnus.
NEWS
By COLMAN MCCARTHY | May 31, 1998
AT THE 40th reunion of Harvard Law School's class of 1958, held on a recent weekend in Boston, the expected displays of conventional success were on full and gilded view. These were senior partners at major corporate law firms, federal judges, old-hand loophole lawyers and fixers, and the settled and secure usually found in the novels of Louis Auchincloss.That would have been it, except that this group had a collective achievement that went well beyond the soarings of any individual alumnus.
NEWS
By Charles Lane | November 8, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Remember the hellish ghetto crack house in Spike Lee's film ''Jungle Fever?'' The director populated the scene with the gaunt forms of white users, sucking grimly on their glass pipes. Mr. Lee was trying to remind his audience that, media stereotypes notwithstanding, there is nothing exclusively ''black'' about drug abuse.And he had a point. Blacks have indeed suffered disproportionately from crack addiction and the attendant violent crime. But in absolute numbers, the majority of drug users in this country have always been white.
NEWS
April 21, 1998
FireSykesville: Firefighters responded to a wash detail at 5: 15 p.m. Friday at Routes 26 and 32. Units were out 15 minutes.Sykesville: Firefighters responded to a fire alarm at 2: 18 a.m. Saturday in the 1000 block of Johnsville Road. Units were out 30 minutes.Gamber: Firefighters responded to an open 911 line at 11: 20 a.m. Saturday in the 2700 block of Appleseed Road. Units were out 13 minutes.Sykesville: Firefighters responded to a child locked in a car at 12: 09 p.m. Saturday in the 7100 block of Brangels Road.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1997
When he was a boy, James Iman used to curse the underwater grasses that clogged the shallow creeks around his Fort Howard home. The wavy green plants grew so thick on the surface they would trap unwary boaters and snag fishing lines.But 25 years ago, the bay grasses virtually disappeared from Shallow and North Point creeks in eastern Baltimore County. So did many of the blue crabs and fish that used to hide in the shaggy aquatic carpet.Now wiser at 43, Iman has become something of a Johnny Appleseed of bay grasses.
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