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By Kate Shatzkin | October 14, 2006
What it is -- Single-serving applesauce blended with blueberries What we like about it --This new blend from Mott's won raves from our 3-year-old taster, who loves both apples and blueberries. It has no added sugar and half the calories of regular applesauce. What it costs --$2.39 for a six-cup pack Where to buy --Available at grocery stores Per serving (1 3.9-ounce cup): --50 calories, 0 grams fat, 0 grams saturated fat, 13 grams carbohydrate, 0 grams protein, 1 gram fiber, 0 milligrams cholesterol, 0 milligrams sodium
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NEWS
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
Jan Griffin from Cary, N.C., was looking for a recipe for the spice cake that used to be made and sold at A&P stores across the country many years ago. Carol Hannan from Kingsville sent in a recipe for an old-fashioned applesauce cake that she thinks is very similar in taste and appearance to the spice cake Griffin is looking for. She said she remembers the A&P cake well. Her recipe calls for nuts (she does not believe that the A&P cake had them, and she said the cake most certainly could be made without the nuts)
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NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Tribune Media Services | September 28, 2003
Cook an apple and you get a magical aroma: It stirs a yearning for simple pleasures and whets the appetite for a delicious treat. Apples are perfect when cooking for two. There are no problems with portion control. Each piece of fruit is a serving. Baking is a simple way to bring the pleasure of this fruit to the table. Your best bets for baked apples include Rome Beauty, a big round fruit; Russet, which has a rust-tinged green skin; Haralson, a regional Midwestern apple, and Esopus Spizenburg, an old Northeastern variety.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 8, 2012
Just because you're trying to eat healthy doesn't mean totally abandoning your sweet tooth. Healthy eating guru Joy Bauer i ncludes many healthy deserts in her healthy recipe library. This week we feature her soft-baked, chocolate-cherry oatmeal cookies as our healthy recipe. If you have a recipe you would like to share email me at andrea.walker@baltsun.com and I will include it on this blog. Ingredients: 1 1/2 cups oats, rolled, quick cooking, or old-fashioned rolled oats 1/2 cup whole wheat flour 1/2 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 cup granulated sugar 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt 1/3 cup semisweet chocolate chips 1/2 cup dried cherries, or dried cranberries 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce 1 tablespoon canola oil 2 egg whites lightly beaten 1 tablespoon vanilla extract Preparation: Preheat oven to 350 degrees and coat one or two baking sheets with oil spray In a medium bowl, whisk together the rolled oats, flour, granulated sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt until the ingredients are evenly distributed.
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen and Maria Hiaasen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 1997
Ah, sensible January. New year's resolutions in place, sweet temptations are out with the old year.But if you've resolved to shed pounds, beware the occasional office birthday party complete with butter cream frosted sheet cake. Forget about that extra cupcake from the batch you've baked for your preschooler's winter carnival. And ignore that craving for devil's food, even after a Spartan weeknight dinner.Too much to bear? Manufacturers have an alternative -- reducing the fat when preparing the cake mixes that have become staples in American pantries.
NEWS
By DONNA PIERCE and DONNA PIERCE,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 12, 2006
Because I am on a restricted diet, can you provide me with a low-fat recipe for a pastry crust? You're not alone in your quest for a low-fat crust, but a good one is hard to find. "There is no successful low-fat recipe," said Barbara Farner, extension educator in nutrition and wellness at the University of Illinois Extension. "Crisp roll-out cookies and piecrusts are two dishes without successful low-fat alternatives." Farner offered these suggestions for those on restricted diets: Select an oil-based piecrust recipe that uses the more healthful canola or olive oil. Such recipes would contain the same amount of fat, but they would contain less saturated fat. Switch to a graham-cracker crust, which requires less fat than that found in a traditional pastry crust.
FEATURES
By Seattle Times | September 18, 1991
This low-fat recipe was takes about 15 minutes to prepare and makes 12 muffins.Whole Wheat Applesauce Muffins 1 1/4 cups whole wheat flour1 cup all-purpose flour1/2 cup brown sugar1 tablespoon baking powder1 1/4 teaspoons cinnamon1/2 teaspoon nutmeg1/4 teaspoon salt4 egg whites1 cup applesauce1/2 cup nonfat milk1/4 cup canola oil1/2 cup golden raisinsLightly grease 12 muffin cups or spray with a nonstick vegetable cooking spray. Set aside.In a large bowl combine the whole wheat and all-purpose flours, the brown sugar, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 8, 2012
Just because you're trying to eat healthy doesn't mean totally abandoning your sweet tooth. Healthy eating guru Joy Bauer i ncludes many healthy deserts in her healthy recipe library. This week we feature her soft-baked, chocolate-cherry oatmeal cookies as our healthy recipe. If you have a recipe you would like to share email me at andrea.walker@baltsun.com and I will include it on this blog. Ingredients: 1 1/2 cups oats, rolled, quick cooking, or old-fashioned rolled oats 1/2 cup whole wheat flour 1/2 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 cup granulated sugar 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt 1/3 cup semisweet chocolate chips 1/2 cup dried cherries, or dried cranberries 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce 1 tablespoon canola oil 2 egg whites lightly beaten 1 tablespoon vanilla extract Preparation: Preheat oven to 350 degrees and coat one or two baking sheets with oil spray In a medium bowl, whisk together the rolled oats, flour, granulated sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt until the ingredients are evenly distributed.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | March 21, 1993
Dining car daysKeeping meals on track is no problem for Penn State instructor James Porterfield, who traveled thousands of miles on America's railroads researching his book "Dining by Rail: The History and Recipes of America's Golden Age of Railroad Cuisine" (St. Martin's Press, 1993, $35).The book combines railroad history and other lore -- such as the story of the evolution of the dining car -- with more than 300 recipes from the great railroads of the 20th century. Among the recipes are nearly a dozen from Baltimore & Ohio dining cars -- including Maryland crab cakes.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | April 21, 2004
Tight on space? Weber-Stephen's new Baby Q grill will let you cook out almost anywhere. The Baby Q, like the Weber Q the company introduced last year, is a portable gas grill with a futuristic design, only the Baby Q is even smaller. This new model weighs 35 pounds (vs. 41 for the Weber Q) and is only 14 inches high, 27 inches wide and 16 inches deep. It has a cooking surface of 189 square inches. Although it is small, it is a true grill with a P-shaped burner that emits open flames under a porcelain-enabled, cast-iron cooking grate.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2008
As a bride in the 1950s, Dorothy McMann of Baltimore used to make an applesauce cake with a recipe that came from the label of the Ann Page applesauce jar. Unfortunately, she never copied down the recipe and she was hoping someone might still have a copy. Millie DiBlasi of Linthicum sent in a recipe for an applesauce cake that she clipped from the newspaper in 1979. Any good-quality, natural-style applesauce will work just fine for this dense but moist spice cake. This cake tastes even better the day after you make it and will keep well for several days.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | May 24, 2008
This might sound crazy, but I think 81-year-old Penn State football coach Joe Paterno might be the most sane voice in college football. Paterno wants a playoff. He said as much this week. He thinks the reasons we don't have one are bogus. He pointed out that no one cares how often - or how little - basketball players go to class. College presidents simply want to protect their golden goose in football: bowl games. The NCAA just added two, by the way, meaning 68 teams get to go to the postseason.
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin | October 14, 2006
What it is -- Single-serving applesauce blended with blueberries What we like about it --This new blend from Mott's won raves from our 3-year-old taster, who loves both apples and blueberries. It has no added sugar and half the calories of regular applesauce. What it costs --$2.39 for a six-cup pack Where to buy --Available at grocery stores Per serving (1 3.9-ounce cup): --50 calories, 0 grams fat, 0 grams saturated fat, 13 grams carbohydrate, 0 grams protein, 1 gram fiber, 0 milligrams cholesterol, 0 milligrams sodium
NEWS
By DONNA PIERCE and DONNA PIERCE,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 12, 2006
Because I am on a restricted diet, can you provide me with a low-fat recipe for a pastry crust? You're not alone in your quest for a low-fat crust, but a good one is hard to find. "There is no successful low-fat recipe," said Barbara Farner, extension educator in nutrition and wellness at the University of Illinois Extension. "Crisp roll-out cookies and piecrusts are two dishes without successful low-fat alternatives." Farner offered these suggestions for those on restricted diets: Select an oil-based piecrust recipe that uses the more healthful canola or olive oil. Such recipes would contain the same amount of fat, but they would contain less saturated fat. Switch to a graham-cracker crust, which requires less fat than that found in a traditional pastry crust.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | April 21, 2004
Tight on space? Weber-Stephen's new Baby Q grill will let you cook out almost anywhere. The Baby Q, like the Weber Q the company introduced last year, is a portable gas grill with a futuristic design, only the Baby Q is even smaller. This new model weighs 35 pounds (vs. 41 for the Weber Q) and is only 14 inches high, 27 inches wide and 16 inches deep. It has a cooking surface of 189 square inches. Although it is small, it is a true grill with a P-shaped burner that emits open flames under a porcelain-enabled, cast-iron cooking grate.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Tribune Media Services | September 28, 2003
Cook an apple and you get a magical aroma: It stirs a yearning for simple pleasures and whets the appetite for a delicious treat. Apples are perfect when cooking for two. There are no problems with portion control. Each piece of fruit is a serving. Baking is a simple way to bring the pleasure of this fruit to the table. Your best bets for baked apples include Rome Beauty, a big round fruit; Russet, which has a rust-tinged green skin; Haralson, a regional Midwestern apple, and Esopus Spizenburg, an old Northeastern variety.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | February 18, 1991
For nearly four decades, General Kinetics Inc. has been driven to moments of success -- and disappointment -- by the inventive genius of its scientists.None has been more prolific and dynamic than the late Robert Gutterman.Mr. Gutterman, a physicist, co-founded GKI in 1954 with retired Adm. William Goggins, mathematician Alfred E. Roberts and electrical engineer Walter Anderson.The four men, who went without pay for their first year, got their first big break in the late 1950s when Mr. Gutterman thought of a way to help filmmakers clean grease pencil marks off master prints.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | May 24, 2008
This might sound crazy, but I think 81-year-old Penn State football coach Joe Paterno might be the most sane voice in college football. Paterno wants a playoff. He said as much this week. He thinks the reasons we don't have one are bogus. He pointed out that no one cares how often - or how little - basketball players go to class. College presidents simply want to protect their golden goose in football: bowl games. The NCAA just added two, by the way, meaning 68 teams get to go to the postseason.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2000
Marie Kursave of Rapid City, S.D., wrote that she wanted a fruitcake recipe that "called for applesauce as the liquid and was more like an all-spice cake with candied fruit." A recipe from "Favorite Recipes of Methodist Women" was submitted by Ruth Perkins of Thomasville, Mo. Applesauce Fruitcake Makes one 5-pound cake; serves 20 1 cup (2 sticks) butter or vegetable shortening 2 cups granulated sugar 3 eggs, beaten 4 teaspoons baking soda 1 quart applesauce 4 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg 1/2 teaspoon cloves 1/2 teaspoon allspice 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 cup chopped walnuts or pecans 1 cup raisins 1 cup dates, chopped 1 pint mixed candied fruit Cream shortening and sugar; add eggs.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | January 26, 2000
Lois Moffitt of Aberdeen, N.C., requested a recipe for an applesauce cake with caramel icing, "which I heard about on a television show with Tennessee Ernie Ford, who said his mother made the cake. I hope you can find it," she wrote. "This may be the recipe Lois Moffitt is seeking. It was a favorite of mine and my friends growing up in the '50s," wrote Marie Ann Heiberg Vos of Crystal Lake, Ill. Applesauce Cake With Caramel Icing Serves 12-16 4 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons cinnamon 1 teaspoon cloves 1 teaspoon nutmeg 2 teaspoons baking soda 2 cups sugar 1 cup butter or shortening 2 eggs 2 1/2 cups applesauce 1 1/2 cups chopped walnuts 2 cups raisins Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
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