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Apple Trees

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By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 27, 2002
Q. I am preparing to order several bare-root apple trees for our back yard. The catalog recommends planting more than one variety. Why is this important? A. Plants produce fruit only after pollen has been transferred from the male part of a flower (anther) to the female part (stigma). This fertilizes the flower to produce the fruit embryo in the same way that sperm fertilizes an egg to produce a human embryo. The problem with apples is that specific varieties generally do not fertilize themselves.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
There seem to be an awful lot of vines on the trees in our area. We're having a community meeting to discuss it. What should we do about them? High levels of carbon dioxide benefit some plants more than others, and vines are big beneficiaries. However, you need to identify which vines you have. Natives such as Virginia creeper and poison ivy usually don't harm trees, having evolved together. Invasive vines such as oriental bittersweet and English ivy, on the other hand, are highly damaging because they smother and weigh down trees — as well as other plants.
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FEATURES
By Gaile Robinson and Gaile Robinson,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | December 4, 1998
The tree is the most profound sight at the Alamo.Anyone who has been to Texas' most famous historical attraction in the last half of this century knows immediately which tree: the enormous, undulating live oak that dominates the courtyard.The Alamo tree is for sale; so are offspring of the Civil War battlefields -- Pickett's Charge Black Walnut from Gettysburg, and the Antietam Sycamore. Cuttings and seedlings from many of America's most famous trees are being sold by American Forests, the oldest nonprofit conservation organization in the United States, through its Historic & Famous Trees program.
HEALTH
By Mindy Athas, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
A nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center regularly provides a guest post. This week, Mindy Athas weighs in on apples. Finding fresh, local and tasty ripe apples in the fall is easy. May some apple wisdom fall upon your head. Apple Appeal: Part of the rose family and related to plums, peaches and almonds, apples are one of the oldest and most widely cultivated tree fruits. Originating in Asia and later in Europe, apple trees were brought to North America by colonists in the 17th century (the only native versions are crab apples)
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 18, 2006
Five years ago, I planted an apple tree called "Johnny Seek No Further." So far, no fruit. There are a few blossoms, but nothing comes of them. I'm debating whether to chop it down. Like virtually all apple trees, "Johnny Seek No Further," commonly known as "Rambo," requires another apple tree of a different variety (or a crabapple) within about 100 feet in order to cross pollinate and produce fruit. Other factors that reduce fruit production are shade, overfertilizing and the absence of adequate pollinators, i.e., bees, wasps and other insects (so avoid spraying insecticides on or around the trees during bloom time)
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | March 29, 1992
Congratulate me: I'm expecting. In fact, I am several days overdue. I could go into labor any time now, just as soon as my bundle of joy arrives from the nursery.See, I ordered an apple tree.It all happened so fast. One minute I was lying in bed reading garden catalogs, and the next thing I knew I had popped the question to my wife."Want to have another one?" I asked.Meg rolled her eyes. "It's so much work," she said. "Besides, you've got three apple trees already. Who's going to pick up after them all?"
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
There seem to be an awful lot of vines on the trees in our area. We're having a community meeting to discuss it. What should we do about them? High levels of carbon dioxide benefit some plants more than others, and vines are big beneficiaries. However, you need to identify which vines you have. Natives such as Virginia creeper and poison ivy usually don't harm trees, having evolved together. Invasive vines such as oriental bittersweet and English ivy, on the other hand, are highly damaging because they smother and weigh down trees — as well as other plants.
FEATURES
April 20, 1997
I have a couple of crab apple and flowering cherry trees in my yard. I recently noticed what looks like small, silken tents in the upper branches. Is some kind of animal taking up residence in my trees?Your visitors are Eastern tent caterpillars -- one of the first defoliators to appear in the spring (usually on wild cherry). The caterpillars hide in their nests at night and feed on tree leaves during the day.You can knock the tents down into a bucket of soapy water, prune off infested branches if you can reach them, or spray your foliage with B.t., a microbial insecticide that acts as a stomach poison on young caterpillars.
NEWS
By Marty Ross and By Marty Ross,Universal Press Syndicate | October 3, 2004
There's nothing quite like taking a bite out of a crisp, juicy apple, especially when it comes from right outside your own door. Even if you have only a tiny city garden, you probably have enough room to grow your own fruit. Harvesting fruit in your own back yard is very satisfying, and it's not difficult, the experts say. It's important to choose the right size tree for your garden, and to select varieties that are appropriate for your climate, but if you make good choices early on, fruit trees are quite a thrill to grow.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Fred Rasmussen and Mary Gail Hare and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writers | April 19, 1994
Earl G. Weber Sr., who turned a roadside market into the largest cider retail operation in Maryland, died Friday of cancer at Manor Care Nursing Home in Towson. He was 74.He had been involved with the farm on Proctor Lane in Baltimore County since his early childhood.After the death in 1932 of his father, Jacob Frederick Weber, he quit school at the age of 13 to help his mother run the farm, which the family has owned since 1907.In 1947, Mr. Weber installed production equipment on the farm and founded Weber's Cider Mill Farm, which today is operated by a third generation of the family.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2011
Choosy diners know that among the myriad offerings in pay-by-weight buffets, they are likely to find much that is mediocre and maybe a few reliable comfort food picks. Big Apple Tree Café runs a pay-by buffet and operates a sandwich counter at Baltimore and South streets. The café serves breakfast and lunch in a quadrant of the city teeming with government and private office workers. It sits within a couple blocks of the U.S. Post Office and Courthouse, the MD District Courthouse and City Hall.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 1, 2006
Alan Walsh grabbed wooden crates from the back of his pickup truck and walked to a row of trees thick with red and gold apples. Working quickly, he plucked Jonagold apples from the branches, able to grasp four per hand before dropping them into a bushel crate. "Apple-picking goes pretty quick," Walsh, manager of Wilson Mill Orchard in Darlington, said as he plucked. "You don't even have to think about it; you just pick 'em." It's a good thing, too, because Walsh and others at Wilson Mill have been working to fill a formidable order: 10,000 apples for the 20th annual Darlington Apple Festival on Saturday.
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 18, 2006
Five years ago, I planted an apple tree called "Johnny Seek No Further." So far, no fruit. There are a few blossoms, but nothing comes of them. I'm debating whether to chop it down. Like virtually all apple trees, "Johnny Seek No Further," commonly known as "Rambo," requires another apple tree of a different variety (or a crabapple) within about 100 feet in order to cross pollinate and produce fruit. Other factors that reduce fruit production are shade, overfertilizing and the absence of adequate pollinators, i.e., bees, wasps and other insects (so avoid spraying insecticides on or around the trees during bloom time)
NEWS
By Marty Ross and By Marty Ross,Universal Press Syndicate | October 3, 2004
There's nothing quite like taking a bite out of a crisp, juicy apple, especially when it comes from right outside your own door. Even if you have only a tiny city garden, you probably have enough room to grow your own fruit. Harvesting fruit in your own back yard is very satisfying, and it's not difficult, the experts say. It's important to choose the right size tree for your garden, and to select varieties that are appropriate for your climate, but if you make good choices early on, fruit trees are quite a thrill to grow.
NEWS
May 31, 2004
Josie Carey, 73, a children's television pioneer who was an early collaborator with Fred Rogers, died Friday in Pittsburgh of complications from injuries sustained in a fall. She was the host of The Children's Corner, which aired in Pittsburgh from 1954 to 1961 and appeared on NBC for 39 weeks. In 1955, the show received a Sylvania Television Award honoring it as the nation's best local children's program. She later had children's shows in Pittsburgh and South Carolina. She wrote lyrics for 68 songs during the seven-year run of The Children's Corner, while Mr. Rogers, who went on to become a television icon on Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, wrote the music and stayed behind the scenes doing puppetry.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | May 9, 2004
When I visited the Chicago Board of Trade with my high school economics class, my fellow students and I giggled about serious adults trading in something called pork bellies. Today, we might giggle about Wall Street analysts making intense predictions about prospects for something equally silly-sounding called iPods. The mad dash to this colorful and tiny digital music player sent Apple Computer Inc. stock soaring, and the energized company now sells more of them than it does computers.
FEATURES
By Nancy A. Pappas and Nancy A. Pappas,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 1997
It was supposed to be just a hobby.The city boy from Chicago, trained as an engineer and working in the field of non-linear stress analysis, never envisioned himself as any kind of a farmer. Never thought he'd be selling produce out of half-bushel baskets lined up on his driveway. Never thought he'd be a popular guest speaker for garden clubs. And certainly never imagined he'd be mail-ordering plant material to customers as far away as Alaska.But these days, James Dierberger's hobby has a name and a personality of its own. His Seek No Further Orchard in Hebron, Conn.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 27, 2002
Q. I am preparing to order several bare-root apple trees for our back yard. The catalog recommends planting more than one variety. Why is this important? A. Plants produce fruit only after pollen has been transferred from the male part of a flower (anther) to the female part (stigma). This fertilizes the flower to produce the fruit embryo in the same way that sperm fertilizes an egg to produce a human embryo. The problem with apples is that specific varieties generally do not fertilize themselves.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 30, 2001
Q. I have seen many varieties of flowering crab apple for sale at local nurseries and would like to plant several this fall. What characteristics should I look for when selecting a particular variety? A. There are several things to consider when selecting a crab apple tree. First, because crab apples vary greatly in their susceptibility to disease, I would be sure to select a variety that has good disease resistance. The trees you select should be resistant to apple scab and fire blight, the two most important diseases of crab apple.
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