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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2012
Atholton High School student Eric Lu whipped out his cellphone and displayed information about the 7.3-magnitude earthquake that occurred off the west coast of Sumatra on Tuesday. The information came courtesy of mobile application software called Quakes — Earthquake Notifications, and Lu vouches for its accuracy. After all, it's his app. Lu, 17, is an independent software developer who has four applications on Apple's App Store sites. They include Quakes, a free app that Lu says offers users information on earthquakes greater than magnitude 2.5, along with data from the U.S. Geological Survey.
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FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Stevie Wonder just called to say I love you, Baltimore, over the weekend. The musician ate dinner at The Land of Kush , a vegan restaurant in Seton Hill, on Saturday, according to owner Greg Brown. "His bodyguard introduced me to Stevie and said, 'Stevie Wonder would like to have dinner with you,'" Brown recalled. The star said he had recently started eating a vegetarian diet, Brown said. Wonder, who was with his niece and the bodyguard, ordered vegan barbecue rib tips, a rice and vegetable medley, split pea soup and candied yams, Brown said.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
About 8:30 Friday morning, Brian Dorr emerged, with a large smile and his arms raised, from the Apple Store at The Mall in Columbia, as blue-shirted employees cheered and slapped him high-fives. He and his wife, Donna, got what they came for: the third-generation iPad. While the rest of the mall's stores were closed and window displays were dark, a line formed around the second-floor Apple Store as shoppers gathered to purchase Apple's latest coveted gadget. Apple started selling its newest tablet Friday, betting that the sharper screen and faster chip will extend its lead over Google and Amazon.com in the growing market.
BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | September 19, 2013
On Friday, Apple will release the latest version of its flagship phone, the iPhone 5S, along with a colorful budget conscience model, the iPhone 5C. As with other product launches, the new phones are expected to be in demand, so much so that area retailers have geared up for the occasion. With a two-year phone contract, the iPhone 5S will set you back $199.99, $229.99 or $399.99 depending on how many gigs of space you want (16, 32, 64 respectively). The lower-end iPhone 5C costs $99.99 (16GB)
BUSINESS
By Stephanie Newton and Stephanie Newton,Sun reporter | June 28, 2007
Mario Armstrong knows exactly where he will be at 5:50 p.m. tomorrow - perched in a lawn chair outside an AT&T store north of Towson with a supply of food and water and a Mac PowerBook on his lap, fired up and ready to go. His mother in Towson and brother in Washington will be manning their home computers, poised to click on "confirm purchase" when the clock ticks 6 - the witching hour for one of the most anticipated and hyped technology launches ever,...
BUSINESS
By DAVID ZEILER | February 21, 2008
It was a month before I even took it out of the box, but now that I have had a few days to play with my new printer/scanner/copier, I'm glad I took Apple up on its offer. Last month, when I bought my new Mac Pro, the Apple Store employee helping me suggested I also buy an all-in-one device as part of Apple's seemingly perpetual "Perfect Companion" promotion. It offers a rebate of up to $100 if you buy a qualifying printer from the Apple Store (either one in a mall or the online version)
EXPLORE
By Kathy Hudsonhudmud@aol.com | December 15, 2011
The second chapter in the story of my cracked iPad begins with a late trip last Thursday to the Apple    store in Towson.     Juan Leura of MacDaddy  in Bel Air, my go-to place for Apple repair, recommended I take the new iPad with its cracked glass to the Apple store. He thought they would replace it.  I thought he was an extreme optimist.   I went out anyway late Thursday evening after a meeting.  All iPad techs were booked, and the next appointment was for 1:40 p.m. on Friday.    I returned Friday.
BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | September 19, 2013
On Friday, Apple will release the latest version of its flagship phone, the iPhone 5S, along with a colorful budget conscience model, the iPhone 5C. As with other product launches, the new phones are expected to be in demand, so much so that area retailers have geared up for the occasion. With a two-year phone contract, the iPhone 5S will set you back $199.99, $229.99 or $399.99 depending on how many gigs of space you want (16, 32, 64 respectively). The lower-end iPhone 5C costs $99.99 (16GB)
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 27, 2003
SAN JOSE, Calif. - You're probably reclining in digital contentment under the tree, snuggling with your shiny new iPod. No? Join the club. Around the globe, gadget lovers who hoped to get one are learning that Apple Computer's diminutive music players are in short supply. Many electronics stores said they had sold all but the most expensive models - which prompted some shoppers to spend $500 for the high-end iPod rather than do without. The scarcity of the iPod, a white, digital music player about the size of a computer mouse, affirms its status as the It-Thing, the technology industry's answer to Pilates and Orlando Bloom.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 7, 2007
SAN FRANCISCO -- David Flashner thought he had it wired: Buy two iPhones last week when they first went on sale, keep one and sell the other at a profit so big it would pay for most of the first one. Flashner wasted no time. He began advertising the extra phone while still in line at an Apple store in Burlingame, Calif., south of San Francisco. During his 21-hour wait, he posted half a dozen different ads to Craigslist - with prices ranging from $800 to $1,200 - and waited for the calls to come in. But no calls came because consumers expect that stores will soon have phones in stock.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
About 8:30 Friday morning, Brian Dorr emerged, with a large smile and his arms raised, from the Apple Store at The Mall in Columbia, as blue-shirted employees cheered and slapped him high-fives. He and his wife, Donna, got what they came for: the third-generation iPad. While the rest of the mall's stores were closed and window displays were dark, a line formed around the second-floor Apple Store as shoppers gathered to purchase Apple's latest coveted gadget. Apple started selling its newest tablet Friday, betting that the sharper screen and faster chip will extend its lead over Google and Amazon.com in the growing market.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2012
Atholton High School student Eric Lu whipped out his cellphone and displayed information about the 7.3-magnitude earthquake that occurred off the west coast of Sumatra on Tuesday. The information came courtesy of mobile application software called Quakes — Earthquake Notifications, and Lu vouches for its accuracy. After all, it's his app. Lu, 17, is an independent software developer who has four applications on Apple's App Store sites. They include Quakes, a free app that Lu says offers users information on earthquakes greater than magnitude 2.5, along with data from the U.S. Geological Survey.
EXPLORE
By Kathy Hudsonhudmud@aol.com | December 15, 2011
The second chapter in the story of my cracked iPad begins with a late trip last Thursday to the Apple    store in Towson.     Juan Leura of MacDaddy  in Bel Air, my go-to place for Apple repair, recommended I take the new iPad with its cracked glass to the Apple store. He thought they would replace it.  I thought he was an extreme optimist.   I went out anyway late Thursday evening after a meeting.  All iPad techs were booked, and the next appointment was for 1:40 p.m. on Friday.    I returned Friday.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | June 1, 2008
iTunes users, beware. Someone's phishing for your personal data online. Technology news source Computerworld Inc. says phishers have targeted users of Apple Inc.'s music store by sending people spam e-mails that tell users that they must correct a problem with their iTunes account. The e-mail includes a link that leads users to a site posing as an iTunes billing update page. The phony page then asks for information, including your credit card number and security code, Social Security number and mother's maiden name.
BUSINESS
By DAVID ZEILER | February 21, 2008
It was a month before I even took it out of the box, but now that I have had a few days to play with my new printer/scanner/copier, I'm glad I took Apple up on its offer. Last month, when I bought my new Mac Pro, the Apple Store employee helping me suggested I also buy an all-in-one device as part of Apple's seemingly perpetual "Perfect Companion" promotion. It offers a rebate of up to $100 if you buy a qualifying printer from the Apple Store (either one in a mall or the online version)
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 7, 2007
SAN FRANCISCO -- David Flashner thought he had it wired: Buy two iPhones last week when they first went on sale, keep one and sell the other at a profit so big it would pay for most of the first one. Flashner wasted no time. He began advertising the extra phone while still in line at an Apple store in Burlingame, Calif., south of San Francisco. During his 21-hour wait, he posted half a dozen different ads to Craigslist - with prices ranging from $800 to $1,200 - and waited for the calls to come in. But no calls came because consumers expect that stores will soon have phones in stock.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Stevie Wonder just called to say I love you, Baltimore, over the weekend. The musician ate dinner at The Land of Kush , a vegan restaurant in Seton Hill, on Saturday, according to owner Greg Brown. "His bodyguard introduced me to Stevie and said, 'Stevie Wonder would like to have dinner with you,'" Brown recalled. The star said he had recently started eating a vegetarian diet, Brown said. Wonder, who was with his niece and the bodyguard, ordered vegan barbecue rib tips, a rice and vegetable medley, split pea soup and candied yams, Brown said.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | June 1, 2008
iTunes users, beware. Someone's phishing for your personal data online. Technology news source Computerworld Inc. says phishers have targeted users of Apple Inc.'s music store by sending people spam e-mails that tell users that they must correct a problem with their iTunes account. The e-mail includes a link that leads users to a site posing as an iTunes billing update page. The phony page then asks for information, including your credit card number and security code, Social Security number and mother's maiden name.
BUSINESS
By Stephanie Newton and Stephanie Newton,Sun reporter | June 28, 2007
Mario Armstrong knows exactly where he will be at 5:50 p.m. tomorrow - perched in a lawn chair outside an AT&T store north of Towson with a supply of food and water and a Mac PowerBook on his lap, fired up and ready to go. His mother in Towson and brother in Washington will be manning their home computers, poised to click on "confirm purchase" when the clock ticks 6 - the witching hour for one of the most anticipated and hyped technology launches ever,...
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 27, 2003
SAN JOSE, Calif. - You're probably reclining in digital contentment under the tree, snuggling with your shiny new iPod. No? Join the club. Around the globe, gadget lovers who hoped to get one are learning that Apple Computer's diminutive music players are in short supply. Many electronics stores said they had sold all but the most expensive models - which prompted some shoppers to spend $500 for the high-end iPod rather than do without. The scarcity of the iPod, a white, digital music player about the size of a computer mouse, affirms its status as the It-Thing, the technology industry's answer to Pilates and Orlando Bloom.
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