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By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
Bonita Burbank from Redmond, Ore., was looking for a recipe for what she called mock apple pie. She said this was a popular recipe back in the 1970s and that it was made with Ritz crackers in place of apples. Many readers sent in the recipe for a two-crust pastry version of a mock apple pie that appeared on the box of Ritz crackers back in the day. (In fact, several readers sent me the recipe cut from the side of the Ritz box.) I also received several recipe versions from the Internet.
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NEWS
December 1, 2013
So it's OK to shop after the Sept. 11 terrorist attack but not to spend money during a happy time ( "Thanks for not shopping," Nov. 25)? Consumerism is as American as apple pie. Some families consider shopping a bonding experience. Passing judgment on people who have been out of work for several years due to our lame economy is short-sighted and condescending. I am not a shopper or a mass consumer, but I certainly don't consider spending money on people one loves to be bad behavior.
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NEWS
By Mark Graber | January 28, 2010
Some were shocked when President Obama took time in his State of the Union speech Wednesday night to chastise the Supreme Court for its recent decision on campaign finance, suggesting this amounted to a violation of some deeply held principle. But presidential attacks on the federal judiciary are as American as apple pie and predate baseball. Abraham Lincoln's first inaugural address declared: "The candid citizen must confess that if the policy of the government is to be irrevocably fixed by decisions of the Supreme Court, the people will have ceased to be their own rulers."
NEWS
June 7, 2013
Bob Ehrlich's recent column claiming that multiculturalism destroys democracy takes a very Eurocentric view of America ("Multiculturalism is the enemy of democracy," June 2). It selectively glosses over some of the ugly things our nation has done on its way to becoming who we are today. The idea that America was built on a foundation of economic and political freedom, regardless of class, economic status or education, is a pleasant fiction, but the reality was quite different. When our country was founded, only white, land-owning males were allowed to vote.
NEWS
June 7, 2013
Bob Ehrlich's recent column claiming that multiculturalism destroys democracy takes a very Eurocentric view of America ("Multiculturalism is the enemy of democracy," June 2). It selectively glosses over some of the ugly things our nation has done on its way to becoming who we are today. The idea that America was built on a foundation of economic and political freedom, regardless of class, economic status or education, is a pleasant fiction, but the reality was quite different. When our country was founded, only white, land-owning males were allowed to vote.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 13, 2004
Heather Swartz of Lawrence, N.J., was looking for a recipe for Apple-Cream Pie that she had clipped from an advertisement for coffee in a women's magazine in the mid-1970s. She remembers it as pretty much of a standard apple pie except that cream was poured over the apple mixture so that it formed a custardlike filling. Connie Gialiani of Baltimore sent in a recipe that fits that description. She came across it in a copy of the Pillsbury Bake-off recipe booklet from 1965. In fact, the Apple-Cream Pie was the winner that year.
NEWS
By Marjorie Priceman | August 15, 2001
Editor's note: An all-American dish goes global. Making an apple pie is really very easy. First, get all the ingredients at the market. Mix them well, bake and serve. Unless, of course, the market is closed. In that case, go home and pack a suitcase. Take your shopping list and some walking shoes. Them catch a steamship bound for Europe. Use the six days on board to brush up on your Italian. If you time it right, you'll arrive in Italy at Harvest time. Find a farm deep in the countryside.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 4, 1998
I HAD A MEMORABLE kitchen table experience recently. I spent an afternoon with my mom sitting at our kitchen table steeping myself in the fine points of pie making and in the small stories of our family history.We peeled apples and made pie dough while listening to a homemade tape recording that told what life was like around 1904 in my grandmother's hometown of Cahirciveen, in Ireland's county Kerry.At times the scene struck me as so homey and nostalgic it seemed like it should be in a Spencer Tracy movie.
NEWS
October 27, 1993
It used to be, to get elected in America, a politician had to speak out for Mom and apple pie. Today, politicians seem to think that favoring term limits is another requirement for getting and staying elected.That is the only explanation for Westminster Councilman Damian Halstad's ill-conceived idea to limit the city's mayor and council to two consecutive terms. Mr. Halstad, a first-termer elected last May, argued that the city's political process would be opened up by limiting elected officials' tenure.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | October 8, 2000
I AM THE family's apple pie enabler. I encourage, assist and cheer on the apple pie maker. Put another way, I peel and slice the apples and my wife makes the pies. While I have made a pie crust in my time, I am, on the whole, dough-challenged. My wife is not. She makes a great pie crust but is time-challenged. She rarely has enough time to make a dessert, especially an apple pie, which involves a lot of cutting and peeling. To encourage her in her pie-making art and to get some sweet stuff on my dessert plate, I recently reached a pie-making pact with her. I do the fruit; she does the dough.
NEWS
May 19, 2013
Regarding the Internet sales tax ("Online sales tax bill should be improved, and passed," May 16), I suppose that if I go to Delaware and purchase something and since I am from Maryland, shouldn't that retailer charge and forward the sales tax? What difference does it make whether I purchase it there and have my wife carry it and bring it to Maryland or have UPS carry it? It's still mine. I purchased it, and I suppose it should be taxed. I also suppose it should be my moral responsibility to tell the retailer, "I'm from Maryland so charge me tax. Here, check my I.D., and forward the tax to Maryland.
NEWS
nabosley411@aol.com | April 9, 2013
Spring is the time of rebirth and renewal . For some, that means tee time and a chance to be outdoors, unwinding from the stresses of everyday life. If golf is your sport of choice, then you need to check out the Zero Prostate Cancer Golf Classic. This event takes place on May 13 from 10:30 a.m.-7 p.m. at the Towson Golf and Country Club, where LPGA tour players will join other golfers to help fight against prostate cancer. Founded by Chesapeake Urology Associates as the Great Prostate Cancer Challenge Baltimore Classic, this event raises funds to further research and provide free screenings in dozens of cities across the U.S. A Driving Range Clinic with the LPGA pros, plus a brunch, is from 10:30 a.m. until noon when a shotgun start begins the 18-hole adventure.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
The sour Skittles are coming out of the woodwork, and I'm finding them increasingly harder to swallow. I am both surprised and amused to learn that all 50 states have turned in pleas (or petitions) to secede from the United States ("Petitions call for secession and dance session," Nov. 15). I'm curious where all this venom and extremism was before the election. Do they realize that if their states were to successfully secede, they forfeit their rights to claim baseball, hot dogs, apple pie and Chevrolet as their mantra?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Debbie Housden from Baltimore was looking for a recipe for an apple crisp that she said was published in the Sunpapers at least 10 years ago. She said the crisp was made with apple pie filling instead of apples and used corn flakes in the topping. Diane Crupi from Bend, Ore., sent in a photocopy of a recipe for an apple crisp that almost certainly is the one that Housden was in search of. Unfortunately, the clipping is not dated, nor does it she say where it was clipped from, but I can tell by the way it is formatted that it is an old Recipe Finder column.
NEWS
September 6, 2012
After listening to the Democrats at their convention, I can't help but wonder, when did it become un-American to have large amounts of money ("O'Malley sharply criticizes the GOP," Sept. 5)? The revered Kennedy family has had enormous wealth (much of it generated by bootlegging), and former community organizer Barack Obama is worth at least $12 million. Building personal wealth is as American as apple pie. The Democrats would have us believe Mitt Romney paid less in taxes then the average citizens.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2011
Tonight's dinner: vegetable stew (vegan, gluten free, contains soy), rice (vegan, gluten free, soy free), fruit salad (vegan, gluten free, soy free), and green salad with avocado and tomatoes (vegan, gluten free, soy free)! Within the first days of Occupy Baltimore, a food committee was formed and most days since the committee of volunteers has prepared meals in the various kitchens around town that have been made available for the volunteers. Don Barton, who works with Baltimore Free Farm, is among the volunteers who prepare dinners for the McKeldin Square occupiers.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | November 10, 2002
As a cooking teacher and food writer, I sometimes avoid certain recipes when entertaining. You'd be surprised to learn that such tour-de-force creations as pates in aspic or souffles are not what intimidate me. I've made many such dishes for dinner parties in the past. What I am most anxious about serving others is simple American comfort food. For example, meatloaf, spaghetti with homemade tomato sauce, potato salad, baked beans are a challenge, not because they are complicated, but because guests always have in mind a favorite version for comparison, usually one their mother made.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | January 7, 1994
At Jason's Restaurant you can't get flounder at night because owner Jason Carrington doesn't keep it on hand. After you order it, he goes across the street to the Broadway Fish Market and buys it fresh. When the market is closed, you'll have to settle for lasagna or pizza or a chicken gyro.This doesn't look like a place that specializes in home cooking, where everything is fresh. The storefront restaurant is a labor of love, but a sort of bare-bones labor of love: very new, very clean, but not much in the way of atmosphere -- unless you consider a sound system alternating Gregorian plainchants with "Brown Eyed Girl" a kind of atmosphere.
NEWS
October 18, 2010
The nation owes a debt to its military veterans and their families. Their service to the nation deserves more than a mere thank-you and a monthly pension check or occasional parade. Their sacrifices have kept this country free and they should be honored for that. But there are others in our society who deserve similar praise. Police and firefighters who have risked their lives to keep our streets safe. Teachers, paramedics, the clergy, social workers, the list of those who have worked in the public's interest (often for relatively low pay)
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