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Apple Festival

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NEWS
September 29, 1991
Old-time food wagons, an apple pie contest with the winning entries auctioned off, fire-safety exhibits, live entertainment, country markets, arts and crafts, helicopter rides, stamp exhibits, hay rides anddelicious food are just part of a long list of activities scheduled for the sixth annual Darlington Apple Festival.The event will be celebrated from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5, throughout the northern Harford village -- rain or shine.Special parking will be available on U.S. 1, near Route 161, withshuttle buses to the festival.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2011
Picturesque little Darlington is a national historic district, home to an annual Apple Festival that attracts thousands and, come Saturday, a feasting ground for the undead. "Run for Your Lives," a 5K run, with zombies, is coming to this tiny Harford County town. Oh, the horror. "That's such a cool thing they're doing," says Heather Wheatley, a three-year resident of Darlington who sells soaps out of a newly opened apothecary shop across the river in Port Deposit. "We're gonna take these zombies just the way they are and accept them wholly.
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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | October 18, 1992
After seven years, Elaine Sweitzer decided to break tradition and get fritters instead of a dumpling at the annual Apple Festival at Piney Run Park in Eldersburg yesterday.fTC The choice came easily for the park naturalist and Manchester resident once she decided she could also buy a few apple dumplings to take home.In the background, a trio called Wherligig played Celtic tunes on hammered dulcimer and other stringed and percussion instruments.On the tennis courts, families combined efforts to stuff straw into old clothes to make scarecrows.
NEWS
By [LIZ ATWOOD] | October 14, 2007
BERTHA PINDER WOMEN'S CIVIC LEAGUE PRESIDENT Bertha Pinder, the Women's Civic League's 80-something president, wants everyone to know about the group's good deeds for the city. The league's main fundraiser is the Baltimore Apple Festival, held last week and co-sponsored by the city Department of Recreation and Parks. Proceeds help maintain the league's historic headquarters at 9 N. Front St. -- once the home of Thorowgood Smith, Baltimore's second mayor. The Women's Civic League also gives awards to city transportation and sanitation workers and provides $1,000 college scholarships to city youth.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 21, 1997
THE SKIES THREATENED, but the weather didn't dampen the spirit of the annual Apple Festival on Saturday at Piney Run Park.A crowd flowed into the park all day long despite the overcast sky. Craft vendors and food concessions did brisk business."
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 1, 2002
WITH THE HELP of beautiful fall weather, Piney Run Park Apple Festival drew a record crowd of about 2,200 during the weekend. Volunteers headed to the park early Saturday with flags decorated with red apples flying from their vehicles to attract visitors. The volunteers had made all the preparations in the preceding weeks for the park fund-raiser. Naturalist Elaine Sweitzer arrived early to set up her Early American cooking demonstration. She was dressed in period garb, and prepared ham and bean soup, Indian pumpkin bread, apple cobbler and a recipe called "Bubble and Squeak" over an open fire.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | October 15, 1993
When an organization is in danger of losing something, such as a paid staff person, for lack of money, naturally it holds a fund-raiser.But when the fund-raiser turns out to be a lot of fun for everybody involved, the organization may keep on having it. Which is what Piney Run Park and Nature Center is doing this weekend for the seventh straight year, as it celebrates fall with an Apple Festival from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday."
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 1, 2006
Alan Walsh grabbed wooden crates from the back of his pickup truck and walked to a row of trees thick with red and gold apples. Working quickly, he plucked Jonagold apples from the branches, able to grasp four per hand before dropping them into a bushel crate. "Apple-picking goes pretty quick," Walsh, manager of Wilson Mill Orchard in Darlington, said as he plucked. "You don't even have to think about it; you just pick 'em." It's a good thing, too, because Walsh and others at Wilson Mill have been working to fill a formidable order: 10,000 apples for the 20th annual Darlington Apple Festival on Saturday.
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Contributing Writer | October 3, 1993
In the rural village of Darlington, local workers picked, polished, cored, sliced, spiced and cooked bushels of the fall fruit yesterday in celebration of the eighth annual Darlington Apple Festival.More than 30,000 fair-goers hungry for a taste of fall were expected to visit the popular one-day event to sample apple pies, apple cakes, apple dumplings, apple muffins, apple cider, apple crepes and caramel apples at this decidedly apple-oriented affair."It's an old-fashioned day in the country," said Debbie Grady, owner of Stonehouse Country Home, an antique and gift shop in Darlington, who set up a candy stand outside the store.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1999
Ella May Ruby does not let 1,000 apples and 150 pounds of dough intimidate her. A baker for most of her 79 years, she can easily take those ingredients and turn them into flaky, golden dumplings for today's Apple Festival at Piney Run Park in Sykesville.She and her husband, Jack, have run the festival since it started 13 years ago. She directs the production, making sure volunteer dumpling-makers have a steady supply of butter, flour, sugar and cinnamon. She relies on unwritten recipes handed down from her grandmother.
TRAVEL
By [ANDREA GROSSMAN] | October 7, 2007
Celebrate fall at the 43rd National Apple Harvest Festival in Arendtsville, Pa., 10 miles northwest of Gettysburg. The festival, created by the Adam's County Fruitgrowers Association, began in 1965 and includes something for everyone: more than 300 arts and crafts vendors, antique and classic cars, puppet shows, and pony and hay rides. Live music will be played on six stages. Festivalgoers can eat an array of foods, including barbecue, rib-eye steak sandwiches, apple butter, kettle corn, apple fritters and sweet potato fries.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | October 5, 2007
Chocolate won. Anyone with a sweet tooth might have paused yesterday, if only for a moment, when confronted with the choice of attending the Chocolate Festival at Lexington Market or the Fall Apple Festival a few blocks east at War Memorial Plaza. The quandary might have been deepened by the apple festival's bold claim of being Baltimore's "sweetest event of the year." It sounded like a salvo across the bow of the chocolatiers, but they stood their ground. "I would differ," said Dana Heyl, whose family owns Moore's Candies, a Baltimore firm founded in 1919 where the house specialty is chocolate-dipped strawberries, pineapples and other fruit.
NEWS
October 4, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Don't forget Earl the Pearl To display a complete picture of the city's sports history, the Sports Legends Museum at Camden Yards needs a Baltimore Bullets exhibit. Sports baltimoresun.com/steele Listen to what Amazon offers For music online without hassle of copy protection, try Amazon. Business baltimoresun.com/himowitz OTHER VOICES Childs Walker on fantasy sports -- Sports Rashod D. Ollison on Rahsaan Patterson -- Live Sam Sessa on Birds of a Feather scotch bar. -- Live 5 THINGS TO DO TODAY Paolo Nutini -- Scottish singer/songwriter Paolo Nutini, who performed at the Virgin Festival in August, returns to the area for a show at the 9:30 Club.
TRAVEL
By [LORI SEARS] | April 29, 2007
Are Galas, Fujis, Granny Smiths, Staymans and Romes the apples of your eyes? Then you'll want to visit the Adams County Apple Blossom Festival at the South Mountain Fairgrounds near Arendtsville, Pa., on Saturday and May 6. You might not know where to begin -- gastronomically speaking -- when you see the delectable apple delights being offered. Try the apple sundae, the apple crisp or apple pie. Have a bit of apple butter or some apple dumplings. Or enjoy fresh apple cider or apple juice.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 1, 2006
Alan Walsh grabbed wooden crates from the back of his pickup truck and walked to a row of trees thick with red and gold apples. Working quickly, he plucked Jonagold apples from the branches, able to grasp four per hand before dropping them into a bushel crate. "Apple-picking goes pretty quick," Walsh, manager of Wilson Mill Orchard in Darlington, said as he plucked. "You don't even have to think about it; you just pick 'em." It's a good thing, too, because Walsh and others at Wilson Mill have been working to fill a formidable order: 10,000 apples for the 20th annual Darlington Apple Festival on Saturday.
NEWS
September 18, 2006
TODAY CONSTITUTION DAY -- The Maryland Institute College of Art, Women for Mutual Security and the Maryland Chapter of the National Lawyers Guild will present a Constitution Day conference from 3 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. in Falvey Hall at the Brown Center, 1300 Mount Royal Ave. Experts will discuss executive power, the separation of powers and the role of international law in U.S. government policy. Admission is free. www.mica.edu. TOMORROW EISENHOWER SYMPOSIUM -- Entertainer and activist Harry Belafonte will speak at 8 p.m. as the first participant in the annual Milton S. Eisenhower Symposium in the Johns Hopkins University's Shriver Hall Auditorium, 3400 N. Charles St. This year's theme is "Finding Our Voice: The Role of America's Youth."
NEWS
By Emeri B. O'Brien and Emeri B. O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2004
Usually, Jim Calcutt said, people can drive through the one-stop-sign town of Darlington in a minute and a half. All that changes on the first Saturday of October. That's when the Apple Festival comes to town. On that day, the town with a population of about 750 swells to the thousands. "It's mind-boggling on Main Street and Shuresville Road," festival organizer Calcutt said. "During the festival, you can't see the pavement. It's wall-to-wall people." Yesterday's overcast weather might have slightly affected attendance.
NEWS
By Emeri B. O'Brien and Emeri B. O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2004
Usually, Jim Calcutt said, people can drive through the one-stop-sign town of Darlington in a minute and a half. All that changes on the first Saturday of October. That's when the Apple Festival comes to town. On that day, the town with a population of about 750 swells to the thousands. "It's mind-boggling on Main Street and Shuresville Road," festival organizer Calcutt said. "During the festival, you can't see the pavement. It's wall-to-wall people." Yesterday's overcast weather might have slightly affected attendance.
NEWS
By Emeri B. O'Brien and Emeri B. O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2004
Usually, Jim Calcutt said, people can drive through the one-stop-sign town of Darlington in a minute and a half. All that changes on the first Saturday of October. That's when the Apple Festival comes to town. On that day, the town with a population of about 750 swells to the thousands. "It's mind-boggling on Main Street and Shuresville Road," festival organizer Calcutt said. "During the festival, you can't see the pavement. It's wall-to-wall people." Yesterday's overcast weather might have slightly affected attendance.
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