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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2010
Over on the Dining@Large blog, we talk often about the relative importance we put on atmosphere, food, and service. In a typical exchange, one commenter will insist that he'd sacrifice a little food quality for great ambience and service; another will swear the opposite. There's a wide range of opinion, and I suspect that happy marriages happen when there's a meeting of the minds on this issue. Geckos, I think, is Exhibit A for the defenders of great atmosphere/good enough food.
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NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | July 2, 2006
A friend who eats with me regularly has a conspiracy theory about restaurants that keep opening and closing in one location. He thinks the way to succeed in the business would be to get a long-term lease and every two or three years close down and reopen with a new name, new concept and new staff. That's about the length of time it takes for a hot new restaurant to become yesterday's news. If things aren't going well, you can close down and reopen after six months, like a Broadway show.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | October 27, 2011
The Hickory Ridge Village Center has a lot to offer. The ambience there seems light, airy and contemporary when not a few of Columbia's commercial centers are looking rather tired these days. One of the center's long-time residents (since 1993, we're told, but it seems longer) is keeping up with the Hickory Ridge outside ambience with a charming new d├ęcor inside. Today's Peking Chef isn't exactly Zen, but the 130-seat restaurant provides a lovely, relaxed interior, with epoxy-topped wooden tables and wooden chairs in the center of the dining room, and booths along the sides.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 27, 1993
Until the other night, the expression "eat with your eyes" had not made much sense to me. I figured that in polite society you ate with your silverware. When no one was looking, you used your fingers.The only thing you did with your eyes was to roll them with delight when you enjoyed something exceptional.The "eat-with-your-eyes" routine started becoming clear to me Saturday night when I went to one of those gala events where every restaurant chef in the city had whipped up a dish and was passing out samples.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | August 27, 1995
Giuseppe Ristorante Italiano, 248 Albemarle St., (410) 685-1859. Open every day for lunch and dinner. Major credit cards. Prices: appetizers, $4.75-$7.95; entrees, $9.50-$22.50. **1/2Sometimes you get tired of Frenchified northern Italian cuisine or chic Mediterranean food. You've had enough hip art students working their way through college by waiting tables. Enough funky atmosphere. Weird breads with unexpected things like olives in them. High prices for a minuscule amount of arty pasta.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2003
North Charles Street has a new hot spot. And we do mean hot. As in south-of-the-border cuisine. Mahmood Karzai -- brother of Qayum Karzai, owner of Helmand, Tapas Teatro and b -- has just opened Tampico Mexican Grill at 1200 N. Charles St. But this isn't any ol' taco joint. The menu actually is more representative of true Mexican fare than the food most of us gringos generally associate with that country. Sure, you can get your burrito at Tampico. But you'll also find a variety of fresh seafood dishes.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2002
Without the "Open" sign to tell you otherwise, it would be easy to assume the Mediterranean Palace on York Road across from Belvedere Square is closed. At dusk one recent night, little light emanated from the nondescript carryout, and it appeared as if one more city establishment had gone out of business. Inside, two customers were having a quiet dinner in a small dining room indifferently decorated with a lonesome tambourine, plastic flowers, a large mirror and faux ivy trailing along a faux trellis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 15, 2002
A new Afghan eatery - Afghan Kabob - has opened in downtown Baltimore and is already doing a bang-up business at lunch, according to owner Anwar Hamidi. The restaurant, at South Charles and Lombard streets, seats about 35 people, but much of its business is take-out and delivery. The menu lists seven appetizers ($3.95 each), six entrees ($6.95-$11.95) and two desserts ($3.95 each). Among the most popular choices, so far: kaddo, a baby-pumpkin appetizer; aushak, an appetizer that Hamidi calls Afghan ravioli; and Hamidi's homemade clay-oven bread.
NEWS
By JOAN WHITSON WALLACE | October 21, 1990
Some people seek the answer to the question, "Is there life after death?" I feel an equally important question is, "Is it possible to diet and still eat out?"Chances are if you read this column with any degree of regularity, you have more than a casual interest in food. Therefore, if you have more than a casual interest in food, there is a good chance you do battle with the bathroom scale on occasion.I took my question to an expert, Rhoda Davis. Davis is an executive with the Social Security Administration at Woodlawn during the week.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun food editor | February 16, 2000
With an air of secrecy similar to Oscar announcements, sealed packets landed with a thud on food-editors' desks recently. But instead of Academy Award nominees, the fat envelopes were stuffed with recipes -- all potential $1 million winners in the Pillsbury 50th Anniversary Bake-Off Cooking Contest. For the first time, the 100 finalists' recipes are being released before the Feb. 28 Bake-Off, including the entry of local contestant Liz Barclay of Annapolis. Marlene Johnson, director of product communications at Pillsbury, says that in previous years the recipes were kept confidential to help maintain judging integrity.
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