Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAppetizers
IN THE NEWS

Appetizers

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | July 2, 2006
A friend who eats with me regularly has a conspiracy theory about restaurants that keep opening and closing in one location. He thinks the way to succeed in the business would be to get a long-term lease and every two or three years close down and reopen with a new name, new concept and new staff. That's about the length of time it takes for a hot new restaurant to become yesterday's news. If things aren't going well, you can close down and reopen after six months, like a Broadway show.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 2003
Steakhouses in the Baltimore area are about as plentiful as conservative rants on AM radio. So, whether you like your beef in the form of argument on the airwaves or food on the plate, there's something for everyone around here. For steak lovers, the choices range from the super-fancy, such as Ruth's Chris, with prices to match, to less-expensive, family-friendly chains such as Outback. Into this crowded market comes Tbonz, a steakhouse that opened in Ellicott City about six months ago. The restaurant manages to find its own place in the crowded lineup by combining good food, reasonable prices and excellent service, all in a restaurant and bar that's casual enough for the whole family.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2010
Portalli's is a pretty lovable Italian restaurant in the Ellicott City location where Jordan's Steakhouse was. I like very much that the folks who opened it have stated their intentions clearly on the restaurant's Web page: "The goal was to create a restaurant that has as much appeal for families looking for a night on the town as it does for the most critical foodies, and the end result is a restaurant everybody can enjoy." Even better, I like that they had a plan in the first place. Do they achieve that goal at every moment and with every dish?
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | October 27, 2011
The Hickory Ridge Village Center has a lot to offer. The ambience there seems light, airy and contemporary when not a few of Columbia's commercial centers are looking rather tired these days. One of the center's long-time residents (since 1993, we're told, but it seems longer) is keeping up with the Hickory Ridge outside ambience with a charming new d├ęcor inside. Today's Peking Chef isn't exactly Zen, but the 130-seat restaurant provides a lovely, relaxed interior, with epoxy-topped wooden tables and wooden chairs in the center of the dining room, and booths along the sides.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2011
If it took me too long to get to Mr. Rain's Fun House, I'm in good company. Approaching its second anniversary, the delightful restaurant has yet to penetrate the city's culinary mind. For one thing, I don't think that wacky name has been doing it any favors. And while its location on the top floor of the American Visionary Art Museum is a perfect fit for Bill Buszinski's freewheeling American cuisine, Mr. Rain's Fun House is out of sight, out of mind. By day, it's a natural lunch destination for museum-goers, but if you told me Mr Rain's has had more than a couple dozen walk-ins for dinner over the past two years, I'd die laughing.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 27, 1993
Until the other night, the expression "eat with your eyes" had not made much sense to me. I figured that in polite society you ate with your silverware. When no one was looking, you used your fingers.The only thing you did with your eyes was to roll them with delight when you enjoyed something exceptional.The "eat-with-your-eyes" routine started becoming clear to me Saturday night when I went to one of those gala events where every restaurant chef in the city had whipped up a dish and was passing out samples.
NEWS
By Teddy Durgin and Teddy Durgin,Special to Baltimoresun.com | February 13, 2004
Are you planning an Academy Awards party, but don't know where to start? You don't want the timetable and budget to spiral out of control like a Jerry Bruckheimer or James Cameron production. At the same time, you would like to make the bash a success for you and your movie-loving friends. Here are some tips to get you started. The goal is to maximize the fun and comfort of your guests even as the annual Oscar ceremony stretches well past its usual three-hour mark on the evening of Feb. 29. Getting Started Sending invitations via the Internet is the best way to gauge who is and isn't coming to your Oscar party.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | August 27, 1995
Giuseppe Ristorante Italiano, 248 Albemarle St., (410) 685-1859. Open every day for lunch and dinner. Major credit cards. Prices: appetizers, $4.75-$7.95; entrees, $9.50-$22.50. **1/2Sometimes you get tired of Frenchified northern Italian cuisine or chic Mediterranean food. You've had enough hip art students working their way through college by waiting tables. Enough funky atmosphere. Weird breads with unexpected things like olives in them. High prices for a minuscule amount of arty pasta.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2003
North Charles Street has a new hot spot. And we do mean hot. As in south-of-the-border cuisine. Mahmood Karzai -- brother of Qayum Karzai, owner of Helmand, Tapas Teatro and b -- has just opened Tampico Mexican Grill at 1200 N. Charles St. But this isn't any ol' taco joint. The menu actually is more representative of true Mexican fare than the food most of us gringos generally associate with that country. Sure, you can get your burrito at Tampico. But you'll also find a variety of fresh seafood dishes.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2002
Without the "Open" sign to tell you otherwise, it would be easy to assume the Mediterranean Palace on York Road across from Belvedere Square is closed. At dusk one recent night, little light emanated from the nondescript carryout, and it appeared as if one more city establishment had gone out of business. Inside, two customers were having a quiet dinner in a small dining room indifferently decorated with a lonesome tambourine, plastic flowers, a large mirror and faux ivy trailing along a faux trellis.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.