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Appetite

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NEWS
July 5, 2012
How is it that The Sun is calling for scrutiny and transparency in government for Baltimore City ("Ducking scrutiny," July 1) yet not for the Obama Administration, Attorney General Eric Holder and the Department of Justice for document production and investigation into Fast & Furious? According to The Sun that's just a witch hunt and Republican grandstanding. J. Shawn Alcarese, Towson
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NEWS
By Steve Almond | September 24, 2014
While football remains far and away our country's most popular sport, in the past few years it has also become our most fraught, thanks to a steady drumbeat of stories underscoring its moral and physical hazards. The headlines dominating the news for the past few weeks have outlined cases of domestic violence by players against their girlfriends (the Ravens' Ray Rice among them) and children, and the acknowledgment by the NFL that one in three players is likely to suffer brain trauma.
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SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | February 16, 2008
A question that lingers after Wednesday's mostly frustrating congressional committee steroid hearing is what is the public appetite - or even tolerance level - for a continued exploration of who is telling the truth in the Roger Clemens case. Not that I'm suggesting there's anything that can be done to make it go away or even that it should go away. In the end, there are federal law-enforcement types out there who will determine whether there is more to be examined here - the operative word being perjury.
NEWS
Staff Reports | December 1, 2013
The weekend after Thanksgiving not only signals the official start of the Christmas season, but also the start of the Christmas tree hunting season.  For many families, holiday traditions include a visit to a cut-your-own tree farm the weekend of Thanksgiving -- or soon afterward. In Carroll County, there are many options for farms where families can search for the perfect tree, cut it themselves and haul it home. In addition to fresh-cut trees, some farms offer baling, wreaths and greens.  The 2013 version of Christmas Trees and Holiday Greens in Carroll County is available online HERE.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN REPORTER | July 17, 2006
KENNETT SQUARE, PA. -- Barbaro's attitude and appetite were upbeat again yesterday, as the vigil over the injured Kentucky Derby winner reached an uneventful 57th day at the George D. Widener Hospital for Large Animals. Dr. Dean Richardson, chief of surgery at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center, said in a statement that Barbaro got another restful night Saturday and remains in stable condition. "His vital signs are good and his attitude remains positive," Richardson said.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2000
Scientists have discovered a compound that can quickly turn off the appetite of mice, enabling the rodents to drop up to a third of their weight. The finding offers new targets for researchers struggling to stop one of the fastest-growing health problems in the country: obesity. Published in today's edition of the journal Science, the report provides fresh insight into how the brain controls feeding behavior. Essentially, investigators interrupted the normal flow of a complex "assembly line" that regulates appetite in the mouse brain.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 23, 2005
Luxury in sound is as much fun to encounter as in accommodations. Folks who attended the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program last night or Thursday received quite an earful of aural luxuriousness. Celebrated Russian bass Paata Burchuladze isn't repeating his sumptuous contribution for today's Casual Concert, but the audience will still find plenty of rich orchestration that will feel good to the ears. The Franco-Russo mix on the bill offers textbook cases in instrumental coloring. Rimsky-Korsakov, Debussy and Ravel took basically the same assortment of strings, winds and percussion devices that had served any number of other composers and turned them into entirely new sound machines.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 2, 2004
New studies in mice suggest that the hormone leptin can fundamentally change the brain's circuitry in areas that control appetite. Leptin acts during a critical period early in life, possibly influencing how much animals eat as adults. And later in life, responding to how much fat is on an animal's body, it can again alter brain circuitry that controls how much is eaten. Researchers say the findings, to be published today in the journal Science, are a surprise and help explain why weight control is so hard for some people.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | December 20, 1998
For years the tiny dining room next to the Stone Mill Bakery in Green Spring Station was open as a restaurant on Friday and Saturday nights only, with a multi-course prix-fixe menu. Ecole, as it was called, was clearly a labor of love for owner and Baltimore native Billy Himmelrich.Although he's made his name here as a bread baker, Himmelrich is a chef by training. He attended La Varenne cooking school in Paris and worked in restaurants in France and Washington before moving back to Baltimore.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 22, 1992
Giving $50 million to the Hopkins only whets its appetite.Clinton may double the size of the cabinet and reward more deserving people.Milosevic could win a fair election, but why leave anything to chance?
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 25, 2013
Ted Cruz is no Joe McCarthy, as so many liberals bizarrely claim. But he might be the conservative Barack Obama. The charge that he's the new McCarthy is something of a compliment from liberals. It means they don't like him, can't really explain why and need to demonize him instead. In other words, he must be doing something right. For conservatives, the comparison to Mr. Obama probably stings more than the McCarthyite smear. But think about it. Both men have impeccable educational credentials.
NEWS
Clarksville21029@yahoo.com 301-854-3624 | September 10, 2013
Breakfast is coming to town. The traditional 5th District Volunteer Fire Department's country breakfasts will be back on the community calendar starting Sept. 15 from 8 a.m. to noon in the Ten Oaks Ballroom at 5000 Signal Bell Lane near the intersection of Routes 32 and 108. The menu includes pancakes, eggs, sausage, bacon, scrapple, apple sauce, gravy and biscuits, breakfast beverages and more. The cost is $9 for adults, $8 for seniors 55+, $5 for children ages 5-10 and free for children under 5. The volunteers appreciate your support and look forward to seeing you Sept.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
I hear a new bug that eats kudzu is coming to Maryland. Isn't that a good thing, since kudzu is an invasive plant? Kudzu bug was found on kudzu in three Maryland counties; unfortunately it won't stay there. This dark, quarter-inch, squarish bug also feeds on soybeans or other beans, and in winter will aggregate on homes similarly to the other new invasive house pest, the brown marmorated stinkbug. It's a good incentive to rid Maryland of its kudzu patches once and for all. For more information or to report the spread of this non-native bug, go to mdkudzubug.org I transplanted some hostas, and now they have white blotches on the leaves.
NEWS
July 16, 2013
While the usual suspects of Maryland politics, the candidates, the fundraisers, the loyalists, the lobbyists and groupies are dining on crabs and beer Wednesday at the annual J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake in Crisfield, a couple dozen volunteers will converge on Annapolis seeking something that seems always out of season in this state, whether it's summer, winter, spring or fall — congressional districts that aren't drawn like paint splatter....
SPORTS
By Chris Korman | May 2, 2013
Todd Pletcher knew there were rumors. When you're one of the winningest trainers in the game who just happens to condition a fifth of the Kentucky Derby field, there are going to be rumors about your horses. He hadn't heard specifics, like the one about Verrazano, the 4-1 second choice on the morning line, not eating this week. But he refuted it Thursday during a measured session with reporters outside of his barn. "All my horses are fine," he said. "People saw them train.
NEWS
July 5, 2012
How is it that The Sun is calling for scrutiny and transparency in government for Baltimore City ("Ducking scrutiny," July 1) yet not for the Obama Administration, Attorney General Eric Holder and the Department of Justice for document production and investigation into Fast & Furious? According to The Sun that's just a witch hunt and Republican grandstanding. J. Shawn Alcarese, Towson
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 13, 1996
Tweezing apart the brain mechanisms that control hunger, scientists have shown that a newly discovered nerve chemical sharply reduces appetite, prompting even starved rats to turn their noses away from food.Though the experiments involved lab animals, the work by researchers at the Scripps Research Institute and the Salk Institute may partially explain the biology of human eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, in which someone who desperately needs food shuns it.The researchers speculate that sustained stress could prompt the brain to produce an excess of the chemical, called urocortin, making it easy to avoid eating.
NEWS
January 13, 2006
I read about a new drug that affects the body's cannabinoid receptors. It is supposed to curb appetite, lower cholesterol and block glucose. Are you familiar with this drug? My doctor and I steer clear of typical diet drugs even though I am overweight (6 feet 3 inches and 285 pounds) because they raise blood pressure and I am pre-hypertensive. Rimonabant (Acomplia) is a weight-loss drug awaiting approval from the Food and Drug Administration. The manufacturer, Sanofi-Aventis, hopes that it will get the green light to market this prescription medicine this year.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | April 27, 2012
Does the U.S. (and the West) possess the internal fortitude to pay the required price to defeat contemporary enemies such asal-Qaidaand its progeny? This question crosses my mind whenever I'm exposed to the "peace groups" that occasionally pop up on television news or appear at a local Fourth of July parade. Their signs and banners reflect emotional demands for peace on behalf of a war-weary country fighting a loose confederation of radical extremists spread around the world. My immediate thought: How do these well-meaning folks process reports such as al-Qaida's recent poster campaign promise to make a return (mass casualty)
NEWS
By Tom Horton | April 19, 2012
For insight as to why we're having trouble restoring the Chesapeake Bay, I'm reading "The Evolution of Obesity" by medical researchers Michael L. Power and Jay Schulkin. It's an illuminating look at how we got so fat. It's epidemic - more than a fifth of the world's population is overweight or obese. In the United States, obesity-related health problems are soaring. The standard revolving door has gone from six to eight feet, and hauling our ampler butts costs airlines a quarter-billion more in fuel than it used to. The proportion of normal-weight Americans is at an all-time low. But what's a fat book got to do with the state of the Chesapeake Bay?
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