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HEALTH
December 21, 2009
Appendicitis refers to an acute inflammatory process involving the appendix, which is a small, worm-like appendage of the first part of the colon, writes Dr. Jason Roland, co-director of minimally invasive and laparoscopic surgery at Good Samaritan Hospital. Anyone with an appendix is at risk for developing it. Here's how to spot and treat the condition: •Appendicitis occurs when the single orifice leading into the appendix becomes clogged, either with stool (known as a fecalith)
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NEWS
December 21, 2009
Appendicitis refers to an acute inflammatory process involving the appendix, which is a small, worm-like appendage of the first part of the colon, writes Dr. Jason Roland, co-director of minimally invasive and laparoscopic surgery at Good Samaritan Hospital. Anyone with an appendix is at risk for developing it. Here's how to spot and treat the condition: Appendicitis occurs when the single orifice leading into the appendix becomes clogged, either with stool (known as a fecalith)
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SPORTS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
Brady Anderson said yesterday he was "fine, just fine" more than a week after feeling pains typical of appendicitis, but doctors who have treated hundreds of cases said his recent play and apparent good health probably mean he never really had the disorder.If he had, his appendix would have ruptured by now and presented him with no choice but to have an emergency operation."I don't think it's reasonable to think that he will ever have appendicitis out of this episode," said Dr. Claudius Klimt, director of emergency medicine at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
HEALTH
December 21, 2009
Appendicitis refers to an acute inflammatory process involving the appendix, which is a small, worm-like appendage of the first part of the colon, writes Dr. Jason Roland, co-director of minimally invasive and laparoscopic surgery at Good Samaritan Hospital. Anyone with an appendix is at risk for developing it. Here's how to spot and treat the condition: •Appendicitis occurs when the single orifice leading into the appendix becomes clogged, either with stool (known as a fecalith)
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1996
Orioles center fielder Brady Anderson, sidelined by what some doctors believe is appendicitis, will play tonight, manager Davey Johnson said last night.And, as Johnson announced this after last night's game, along with the fact that Roberto Alomar will play tonight, he sounded as if he couldn't believe it."I don't know what to expect [with Anderson]," said Johnson. "He's cleared to play [by doctors], and he wants to play. . . . They feel it isn't going to hurt him to play."I don't know if he's got appendicitis.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | July 18, 1995
Q: This may sound crazy, but I dread our family vacation because I'm afraid my 10-year-old will get appendicitis. I did when I was about that age, and I got very sick. How would I know if my son had appendicitis? We are going to be camping in the mountains.A: As far as we know, appendicitis doesn't run in families and there is no reason why a 10-year-old should be a special risk, so we don't think you need to be more concerned than anyone else. The chance that your son will come down with appendicitis during one particular week of his life is very small.
NEWS
December 21, 2009
Appendicitis refers to an acute inflammatory process involving the appendix, which is a small, worm-like appendage of the first part of the colon, writes Dr. Jason Roland, co-director of minimally invasive and laparoscopic surgery at Good Samaritan Hospital. Anyone with an appendix is at risk for developing it. Here's how to spot and treat the condition: Appendicitis occurs when the single orifice leading into the appendix becomes clogged, either with stool (known as a fecalith)
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1996
BOSTON -- Brady Anderson prefers not to think about whether he's going to require immediate surgery for appendicitis. He wants to stay positive and recover his health enough to get back in the lineup and continue playing and hitting homers for the Orioles.Nonetheless, there is a strong possibility Anderson will require surgery that would sideline him for at least three weeks and maybe for as many as six or seven weeks.Anderson said two separate ultrasound tests have indicated he has appendicitis, and unless his discomfort and symptoms are reduced considerably, he'll probably need surgery immediately.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1996
BOSTON -- Orioles center fielder Brady Anderson, on a pace to hit more than 50 homers, has shown early signs of appendicitis, and will miss three to six weeks if surgery is necessary.Anderson went to a local hospital for tests before last night's 13-2 loss to the Boston Red Sox, and afterward, Orioles manager Davey Johnson received confirmation of what club trainers had suspected when Anderson was pained all day."Not a very good day," Johnson said.Anderson said after last night's game that he probably was going to check into a hospital -- he wouldn't say which hospital -- for overnight observation.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
Josh Smith vividly remembers the misery of it all. On the television screen in front of him, his teammates were playing Army in the snow and mud at Lincoln Financial Field and Navy's leading tackler was longing to be with them - out of the toasty room. "I was just laying in a hotel bed up there watching the game," said Smith, referring to Philadelphia. "It hurt a lot. I had the mentality of getting myself ready to play and, three days before, I got appendicitis. It was a crushing blow.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com | June 6, 2009
OAKLAND, Calif. -- Orioles shortstop Cesar Izturis was scheduled to undergo an appendectomy Friday night at a local hospital, a procedure that will likely force him to the disabled list. Izturis reported to McAfee Coliseum on Friday complaining of stomach pains. He was then accompanied to the hospital by assistant athletic trainer Brian Ebel to have a CT scan taken, which determined that he had appendicitis. It's unknown how long Izturis will be out of the lineup. Signed to two-year deal in December, Izturis has started 45 games for the Orioles, hitting .260 with one home run and 13 RBIs, while stabilizing the team's defense with his play at shortstop.
NEWS
By Rich Scherr and Rich Scherr,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 5, 2006
Just how important is football to Francis Scott Key junior Brad Martz? Physicians at Gettysburg Hospital found out in early August when Martz came to them suffering from acute appendicitis, urgently in need of surgery. "The doctor said, `You might miss one or two games.' He said, `Well, then I don't want the operation,' " recalled Brad's father, Darin, holding back a chuckle. "The doctor looked at us and laughed. He said, `Well, Brad, you can either get operated on tonight, or you will be back to see me.' " Martz did have surgery to remove his appendix that night.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER and CHILDS WALKER,SUN REPORTER | May 24, 2006
With a staff of starters who all pitched fairly well last season and the game's most successful pitching coach on hand, the Orioles spoke of the mound as an area of strength, or at least reliability, this spring. Seven weeks later, it seems more like a disaster zone. After Monday's 8-6 loss to the Seattle Mariners, the Orioles ranked first in the majors in walks allowed and second to last in ERA (5.62) and batting average against (.287.) "There is an overall lack of passion on this pitching staff," said frustrated pitching coach Leo Mazzone yesterday.
SPORTS
By JEFF ZREBIEC and JEFF ZREBIEC,SUN REPORTER | May 23, 2006
Late Orioles game: Last night's game between the Orioles and Mariners in Seattle ended too late to be included in this edition. A complete report can be found in later editions or on the Internet at www.baltimoresun.com. SEATTLE -- While the rest of his teammates were slipping on their uniforms and preparing for last night's series opener against the Seattle Mariners, Orioles pitcher Hayden Penn was at a local hospital to have surgery for appendicitis. Penn, the 21-year-old right-hander who was scheduled to pitch tonight in Daniel Cabrera's spot in the rotation, reported to the visiting clubhouse at Safeco Field complaining of stomach problems.
SPORTS
By JEFF ZREBIEC and JEFF ZREBIEC,SUN REPORTER | May 23, 2006
SEATTLE -- While the rest of his teammates were slipping on their uniforms and preparing for last night's series opener against Seattle, Orioles pitcher Hayden Penn was at a local hospital to have surgery for appendicitis. Penn, the 21-year-old right-hander who was scheduled to pitch tonight in Daniel Cabrera's spot in the rotation, reported to the visiting clubhouse at Safeco Field complaining of stomach problems. He was redirected to an area hospital after speaking to team officials, where doctors made the discovery.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | March 6, 2006
Not too long ago, some readers made suggestions as to which player ranked as the toughest Oriole. Someone mentioned Brady Anderson's appendicitis in 1996. He had it, then he didn't. Coincidentally, Anderson sent me a text message on Thursday. So I asked him about it. One doctor said his appendix had to be removed. "I couldn't believe it," Anderson said last week. "I had 32 home runs at the time." A different doctor said the condition might go away if he could deal with the pain. After a few days, he came back and hit 18 more home runs, and the Orioles made the playoffs.
NEWS
By Rich Scherr and Rich Scherr,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 5, 2006
Just how important is football to Francis Scott Key junior Brad Martz? Physicians at Gettysburg Hospital found out in early August when Martz came to them suffering from acute appendicitis, urgently in need of surgery. "The doctor said, `You might miss one or two games.' He said, `Well, then I don't want the operation,' " recalled Brad's father, Darin, holding back a chuckle. "The doctor looked at us and laughed. He said, `Well, Brad, you can either get operated on tonight, or you will be back to see me.' " Martz did have surgery to remove his appendix that night.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | March 6, 2006
Not too long ago, some readers made suggestions as to which player ranked as the toughest Oriole. Someone mentioned Brady Anderson's appendicitis in 1996. He had it, then he didn't. Coincidentally, Anderson sent me a text message on Thursday. So I asked him about it. One doctor said his appendix had to be removed. "I couldn't believe it," Anderson said last week. "I had 32 home runs at the time." A different doctor said the condition might go away if he could deal with the pain. After a few days, he came back and hit 18 more home runs, and the Orioles made the playoffs.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
Josh Smith vividly remembers the misery of it all. On the television screen in front of him, his teammates were playing Army in the snow and mud at Lincoln Financial Field and Navy's leading tackler was longing to be with them - out of the toasty room. "I was just laying in a hotel bed up there watching the game," said Smith, referring to Philadelphia. "It hurt a lot. I had the mentality of getting myself ready to play and, three days before, I got appendicitis. It was a crushing blow.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2003
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- If there were any lingering questions about the health of Maryland wide receiver Derrick Fenner, he answered them near the end of the Terps' first Gator Bowl practice yesterday at Jacksonville University. Fenner, who missed the last three weeks of the regular season after having his appendix removed, grabbed an 80-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Scott McBrien during Maryland's two-minute offense, and looked as fast as ever. His return should give the Terps an additional deep threat when they meet West Virginia on Thursday.
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