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By Liz Bowie | May 5, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer announced three appointmentsto Maryland appellate courts yesterday, including a highly regarded black jurist named to fill a vacancy on the state's highest court.Robert M. Bell, a Court of Special Appeals judge, will move up to the Court of Appeals to replace Harry A. Cole, who retired in January. Judge Cole was the first black appointed to the position, in the 1970s.Diana J. Gibbon Motz, a former Maryland assistant attorney general, and Glenn T. Harrell Jr., an Upper Marlboro attorney and former state's attorney, were appointed to the Court of Special Appeals.
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NEWS
September 4, 2014
The air of seeming inevitability that had developed around the idea of a successful constitutional challenge to state bans on gay marriage was punctured Wednesday by a federal judge in Louisiana. After 21 consecutive decisions favoring marriage equality in federal district and appellate courts since the Supreme Court struck down part of the Defense of Marriage Act, federal District Judge Martin L. C. Feldman upheld the ban on same-sex marriage that Louisiana voters overwhelmingly supported in 2004.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, Ian Duncan and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Former Black Panther leader Marshall "Eddie" Conway walked free Tuesday after spending four decades behind bars for killing a Baltimore police officer - making his one of the highest-profile cases affected by a high court decision that has cut short prison sentences for dozens of felons in recent years. Conway, now 67, always said that he was innocent, alleging political motives in the prosecution of a 1970 shooting that killed Officer Donald Sager, 35, and injured another officer.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
A lawsuit that accuses Creig Northrop Team, Long & Foster and several mortgage firms — including Long & Foster's Prosperity Mortgage Co. — of perpetrating mortgage fraud to ease home buying and selling could go before a jury, after the Maryland Court of Special Appeals reversed a lower court decision that found the statute of limitations had expired in the case. Creig Northrop Team sold more homes than any other real estate group in the state last year and was one of the top five in the country, according to a ranking by RealTrend.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Sun Staff Writer | March 12, 1995
The same DNA test Anne Arundel prosecutors used last week to help convict Scotland E. Williams of the murders of two Washington lawyers is being used more frequently by prosecutors in the country to boost their chances of getting a conviction.Use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test is increasing "exponentially," said Clay Strange, the director of the Legal DNA Unit at the American Prosecutors Research Institute in Northern Virginia.No one has kept an exact count of the number of times PCR evidence has been used since its introduction in criminal trials in the late 1980s.
NEWS
By EMMA VAUGHN and EMMA VAUGHN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 10, 2005
WASHINGTON -- With the Supreme Court nomination process for Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. on hold until hearings in early January, the Senate Judiciary Committee changed course yesterday to address whether sessions of the court should be televised. Sen. Arlen Specter, a Pennsylvania Republican who is the committee's chairman, told a hearing that opening the Supreme Court to television coverage would be "an enormously useful tool for public understanding" and would allow the American people to properly evaluate how their government functions.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | March 18, 1993
Judge John F. McAuliffe, a member of the Maryland Court of Appeals since 1985, says he will retire in December to spend more time on the golf course and with his grandchild.Judge McAuliffe, 60, of Germantown, called being an associate judge on the state's highest court "a tremendous challenge" and said the post was "intellectually stimulating."But he said he needed a change of pace."I would like to spend weekends and evenings without having to pick up briefs and petitions for certiorari and opinions," he said.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | January 5, 1995
An Anne Arundel Circuit Court judge yesterday rejected Terrence Johnson's request for freedom, saying appeals of such a ruling would be tied up in the courts longer than the month remaining on Johnson's prison sentence.Johnson, convicted of one count of manslaughter in the shooting deaths of two Prince George's County police officers in 1978, was told Aug. 11 that he would be released in February if he completed 90 days of work-release.Attorney Melvin White said he also was told by a Parole Commission lawyer that his client could be released earlier if he completed the work-release agreement before Feb. 1. Johnson completed his work release Sunday.
NEWS
By Carl Tobias | November 30, 2008
In the summer of 2000, Francis Murnaghan, a highly respected Baltimore jurist, died after rendering more than two decades of distinguished service on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. Since then, no one has been appointed to his seat. Because that long-standing vacancy deprives Maryland of representation on the court and erodes the delivery of justice, President-elect Barack Obama must expeditiously name a highly qualified replacement. The Fourth Circuit now has vacancies in four of the 15 judgeships authorized for the tribunal, which serves as the court of last resort for 99 percent of appeals filed in Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1996
Her skulls were tucked into a box with care, marked "Very Fragile." There was no last chance to roll her eyes at a likely story, no last colloquy with a murderer.Judge Elsbeth Levy Bothe finished her 17 years on the Baltimore Circuit Court bench with uncharacteristic quiet this week, packing up her chambers at the far corner of the second floor of Courthouse East, known as the "Taj Mahal" for its elegant quarters. Her replacement, Circuit Court master Bonita J. Dancy, is to be sworn in Thursday.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, Ian Duncan and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Former Black Panther leader Marshall "Eddie" Conway walked free Tuesday after spending four decades behind bars for killing a Baltimore police officer - making his one of the highest-profile cases affected by a high court decision that has cut short prison sentences for dozens of felons in recent years. Conway, now 67, always said that he was innocent, alleging political motives in the prosecution of a 1970 shooting that killed Officer Donald Sager, 35, and injured another officer.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
Maryland's second-highest court upheld Friday a judge's ruling that the Cove Point gas facility can be converted to be used for exports, siding with the company that owns the plant and against an environmental group. The Sierra Club argued in court that a 2005 agreement between the organization and the plant's owner, Dominion, prevents it from being used as a base for sending liquefied natural gas abroad. Dominion disagreed, arguing that while the agreement did not explicitly mention exports, it did not preclude them.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Maryland's second-highest court upheld on Monday political consultant Julius Henson's conspiracy conviction in a robocall scheme that prosecutors said was designed to suppress black votes. The Maryland Court of Special Appeals reaffirmed the conviction, writing that the case "presents us with a sad tale. " A judge wrote that Henson "and his collaborators callously attempted to manipulate members of the electorate. " Henson, 64, was found guilty in May 2012 of conspiracy to violate election law by not including an authority line from a robocall used as part of the campaign to elect Republican former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. Erhlich lost the election to incumbent Gov. Martin O'Malley, a Democrat.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
A federal appeals court has upheld Maryland's handgun permitting law, reversing a lower court decision by concluding that the state can constitutionally require an applicant to show “good and substantial reason” that he or she needs a concealed-carry license. Fourth Circuit Judge Robert King, writing for the three-judge panel, said the state had shown that the requirement “is reasonably adapted” to its “significant interests in protecting public safety and preventing crime.” Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler cheered the ruling Thursday, saying the state is “a safer place today because of its handgun conceal-and-carry permit laws.” “The idea is to make sure guns are in the hands of responsible people, and not just anybody who wants to tote a gun in public,” Gansler said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2011
For the third time in a dozen years, a Baltimore jury has convicted Tony Williams in the 1998 shooting death of his fiancee, finding him guilty of first-degree murder and using a handgun in a crime of violence. But no one can say yet whether the ruling, handed down Tuesday, will stick. Two earlier convictions - along with two life sentences - were overturned by state appellate courts, which found that prosecutors and police withheld significant information during separate trials conducted eight years apart.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | July 23, 2010
Gov. Martin O'Malley announced the appointment Friday of several new judges, including Michele D. Hotten to the Court of Special Appeals and eight trial judges to serve in courts in Baltimore City as well as Baltimore, Howard and Montgomery counties. Hotten will serve on the Court of Special Appeals for the 4th Appellate Circuit in Prince George's County. She replaces James P. Salmon, who retired. For 15 years, she has been an associate judge on the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, where she serves as the coordinating judge for civil cases.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1995
DNA from a drinking glass in the home where two lawyers were shot to death in May may be used against Scotland E. Williams when he is tried in the slayings next week, an Anne Arundel circuit judge ruled yesterday.Judge Eugene M. Lerner ruled that the kind of test used on DNA scraped from one of three drinking glasses taken by police from the victims' weekend home is acceptable enough to scientists that it may be used in Mr. Williams' trial.Mr. Williams, 31, of the 800 block of Bradford Ave. in Arnold could be sentenced to death if convicted in the killing of Jose E. Trias, 49, and his wife, Julie Noel Gilbert, 48, both Washington lawyers.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | January 6, 1995
An Anne Arundel circuit judge has rejected a request by Terrence Johnson for an order to release him, saying appeals of such a ruling would be tied up in the courts longer than the month remaining on Johnson's prison sentence.Johnson, who was convicted of one count of manslaughter in the shooting deaths of two Prince George's County police officers in 1978, was told Aug. 11 that he would be released in February if he completed 90 days of work-release.Attorney Melvin White said he also was told by a Parole Commission lawyer that his client could be released earlier if he completed the work-release agreement before Feb. 1. Johnson completed his work release Sunday.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
Eyrania Smith is, in the words of Maryland's second-highest court, a "truly innocent and injured" person. Eyrania Smith, in the words of the same judges of Maryland's Court of Special Appeals, has no basis to sue over her mistreatment. That ruling comes even though all sides agree that Smith was mistakenly arrested on a city warrant that should never have existed, taken away by a police officer who left her two children alone in a car in a highway parking lot, and was shackled by her left wrist and ankles to a pole for more than 12 hours in a Baltimore County police precinct.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | September 11, 2009
New talks are under way that should finally clear the way for the confirmation of federal Judge Andre M. Davis of Baltimore to the long-vacant "Maryland seat" on a federal appeals court, Senate sources said Thursday. Democratic and Republican Senate leaders have been negotiating the exact timing of confirmation votes on several of President Barack Obama's judicial nominees, including Davis. A deal could be reached by early next week, clearing the way for quick confirmation by the full Senate, a Senate staffer said.
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