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NEWS
April 12, 2012
Since the conception and birth of our nation, the basic challenge for our existence has been our participation in our wars of survival which have required our citizens to gallantly rise up and take arms and go into battle. Such action by our nation began with the Revolutionary War (1775-83) when our American colonies gained their independence from Great Britain. This tremendous victory has been followed down through the years by early skirmishes with the native Indians, Spain, France, and Mexico, and then later by the two World Wars, Vietnam, the Korean Conflict and the powerful9/11attack.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 7, 2014
To hear some American hawks talk about President Obama's reaction to the Russian move into Crimea, you'd think he's grabbed Neville Chamberlain's umbrella of appeasement and rushed off to Munich. But Mr. Obama's response to Russian President Vladimir Putin's power move in Crimea can hardly be compared to the British prime minister's fateful surrender to Adolf Hitler's blatant theft of the Sudetenland from Czechoslovakia in 1938. Chamberlain was an open advocate of appeasement before it became a dirty word.
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NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | March 19, 2004
WASHINGTON - The new Spanish government's decision to respond to the attack by al-Qaida by going ahead with plans to pull its troops from Iraq constitutes the most dangerous moment we've faced since 9/11. It's what happens when the Axis of Evil intersects with the Axis of Appeasement and the Axis of Incompetence. Let's start with the Axis of Evil. We are up against a terrible nihilistic enemy. Think about what the Islamist terrorists are doing: They are trying to kill as many people in Iraq and elsewhere as possible so the United States fails in Iraq, so Iraq collapses into civil war, so even a glimmer of democracy never takes root in the Arab world and so America is weakened.
NEWS
November 25, 2013
The big foreign policy story over the weekend was the Obama administration's agreement, along with five other nations, of a sweeping arms deal with Iran that involved Iran agreeing to a freeze of its nuclear program in exchange for relief from U.S. sanctions and the ability to sell some of its oil on the international market. There's one small problem with the administration's deal: it just made war in the Middle East more, not less, likely. The deal, as it stands now, is merely a temporary freeze.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 16, 2008
JERUSALEM -- President Bush used a speech to the Israeli parliament yesterday to liken those who would negotiate with "terrorists and radicals" to appeasers of Nazis - a remark widely interpreted as a rebuke to Sen. Barack Obama, who has advocated greater engagement with countries like Iran and Syria. Bush did not mention Obama by name, and White House officials said he was not taking aim at the Illinois senator, though they were aware the speech might be interpreted that way. The comments set off an angry tussle back home, as Democrats accused Bush of breaching protocol by playing partisan politics overseas.
NEWS
By Walter E. Williams | September 3, 2004
PRESIDENT BUSH'S foreign policy critics at home and abroad share characteristics and visions that have previously led to worldwide chaos and untold loss of lives. These people believe that negotiation, appeasement and caving in to the demands of vicious totalitarian leaders can produce good-faith behavior. Their vision not only has a long record of failure but also devastating consequences. During the late 1930s, France and Britain hoped that allowing Adolf Hitler to annex the Sudetenland from Czechoslovakia would satisfy his territorial ambitions.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 28, 1994
No mailed delivered on Nixon Day. It could become an annual holiday.General Cedras wouldn't fall so Ambassador Pezzullo did.The Serbs keep refuting everyone who denies that the appeasement and firmness lessons of Nazi aggression of the 1930s apply in Bosnia today.Charlie Fenwick Jr. decided to give someone else a chance.Brady Anderson can stay.Nobody for governor!
NEWS
By William Safire | April 28, 1992
A SPECTER is haunting the Bush administration -- the specter of the Lavoro scandal.Four billion dollars, one-fourth of it guaranteed by the U.S. government, flowed through the corrupt Atlanta branch of an Italian bank in the late '80s to finance Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's war machine.The Atlanta bank used U.S. guarantees to borrow money to buy grain, but the Iraqis redirected the ships to Iron Curtain countries where our grain was bartered for weapons.As the huge scam began to unravel in late 1989, the Bush Justice, State and Agriculture departments impeded the investigation.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 25, 2008
Don't read this column yet. First, I want you to do something. Google "Chris Matthews + Kevin James." This will bring up video of the latter, a conservative Los Angeles radio pundit, being questioned by the former on MSNBC's Hardball. You "must" see this video. For the Internet deprived, here's a recap: Mr. James goes on Hardball to comment on a speech President Bush gave before the Israeli Knesset in which he accused unnamed politicians - read: Sen. Barack Obama - of a policy of appeasement toward terrorists.
NEWS
September 10, 2004
Dropping bombs only multiplies terrorists' ranks Walter E. Williams, an economics professor, imagines that we can suppress international terrorism by raining destruction down on countries that harbor terrorists ("Appeasement path leads only to disaster," Opinion * Commentary, Sept. 3). But are we going to bomb Saudi Arabia and Pakistan, two of our friends that still harbor large numbers of radical Islamic fundamentalists? Economists are known for being cut off from the real world, but Mr. Williams should at least understand basic laws of supply and demand.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 1, 2013
Who doesn't admire former Republican Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole? Wounded World War II veteran, part-time comedian (Mr. Dole once described a meeting of former presidents Carter, Ford and Nixon as "see no evil, hear no evil -- and evil"), former presidential candidate and all-around decent man, Mr. Dole was a part of government for much of his life. Therein lies the problem for some who stay in politics and government so long that it is easy to lose perspective and think cutting deals is more important than winning the argument.
NEWS
April 12, 2012
Since the conception and birth of our nation, the basic challenge for our existence has been our participation in our wars of survival which have required our citizens to gallantly rise up and take arms and go into battle. Such action by our nation began with the Revolutionary War (1775-83) when our American colonies gained their independence from Great Britain. This tremendous victory has been followed down through the years by early skirmishes with the native Indians, Spain, France, and Mexico, and then later by the two World Wars, Vietnam, the Korean Conflict and the powerful9/11attack.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2011
Bringing up deer. Does are pretty good at it, as the statewide population of 230,000 would indicate. But in most cases, elected officials might be better off not bringing up deer at all. The beautiful critters with the soulful brown eyes can still be the third rail of wildlife politics. Just ask Baltimore County Council member Todd Huff, one of the authors of the law to thin the herd in local parks. Huff and council colleague David Marks took the buck by the antlers when it became apparent that deer were treating county lands like an all-you-can-eat salad bar. "We had a major problem.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 25, 2008
Don't read this column yet. First, I want you to do something. Google "Chris Matthews + Kevin James." This will bring up video of the latter, a conservative Los Angeles radio pundit, being questioned by the former on MSNBC's Hardball. You "must" see this video. For the Internet deprived, here's a recap: Mr. James goes on Hardball to comment on a speech President Bush gave before the Israeli Knesset in which he accused unnamed politicians - read: Sen. Barack Obama - of a policy of appeasement toward terrorists.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 16, 2008
JERUSALEM -- President Bush used a speech to the Israeli parliament yesterday to liken those who would negotiate with "terrorists and radicals" to appeasers of Nazis - a remark widely interpreted as a rebuke to Sen. Barack Obama, who has advocated greater engagement with countries like Iran and Syria. Bush did not mention Obama by name, and White House officials said he was not taking aim at the Illinois senator, though they were aware the speech might be interpreted that way. The comments set off an angry tussle back home, as Democrats accused Bush of breaching protocol by playing partisan politics overseas.
NEWS
December 5, 2007
The news that America's spy agencies have concluded that Iran stopped its nuclear weapon program four years ago is entirely welcome, for two reasons. First, the substance of the assessment is great to hear, if it's true. If Iran isn't pursuing nuclear bombs, that's good for the Mideast and good for the world. Second, the implication of the assessment is heartening, to say the least. It makes the possibility of an American military attack on Iran during the last year of President Bush's term considerably smaller.
NEWS
December 5, 2007
The news that America's spy agencies have concluded that Iran stopped its nuclear weapon program four years ago is entirely welcome, for two reasons. First, the substance of the assessment is great to hear, if it's true. If Iran isn't pursuing nuclear bombs, that's good for the Mideast and good for the world. Second, the implication of the assessment is heartening, to say the least. It makes the possibility of an American military attack on Iran during the last year of President Bush's term considerably smaller.
NEWS
October 26, 2001
Press has no right to endanger the lives of American soldiers The Sun's editorial concerning the free press missed a couple items ("A high-tech information war," Oct. 15). What would be the penalty for an editor whose actions resulted in the deaths of U.S. servicemen or women? Death? Life in prison? What would he or she say to the mother and father of those servicemen? Husband or wife? Son or daughter? The Sun argued: "But editors, not government, must be the arbiters of what's fit to air or print."
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | November 2, 2006
Sluggish grocery sales and other financial problems are placing renewed pressure on Dutch conglomerate Royal Ahold NV - the parent of Giant Food supermarkets and U.S. Food Service in Columbia - to fix its continuing troubles. Ahold is suffering from years of ill-fitted mergers, high labor costs, accounting scandals and management decisions that isolated shoppers from its neighborhood grocery stores. A string of weak quarterly sales results convinced Ahold chief executive Anders C. Moberg in July to call for a review of assets to help drive growth.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2005
A state Senate committee yesterday endorsed a slot machine gambling proposal for the third year in a row, this time adding a few twists designed to pacify opponents in the House of Delegates - and, some lawmakers say, satisfy the competing, deep-pocketed interests that hope to profit from slots. The proposal, which passed the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee by an 11-2 vote, mostly mirrors Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s plan for 15,500 slot machines around the state with the proceeds going to shore up the racing industry, build new schools and pay for the state's stepped-up education funding program.
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