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NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1996
A state appeals court has ruled that a large trucking company cannot continue to operate near a residential neighborhood in White Marsh, a decision that could end a long-running dispute between the business owner and nearby residents.Leo J. Umerley Inc., which has been in business near the small community of Nottingham for nearly four decades, has been operating outside of zoning laws since the late 1970s, according to a ruling issued by the Maryland Court of Special Appeals.Owner Leo J. Umerley Sr. and his wife asked the appeals court to overturn a ruling that they said could force the company out of business.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Robert L. Karwacki, a retired Maryland Court of Appeals judge who was president of the Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners during the troubled early 1970s, died of kidney failure Monday at his Chester home. The former Mount Vernon resident was 80. He was named head of the city's school board in 1970 and assisted in the appointment of Baltimore's first African-American schools superintendent. "Brown v. the Board was years earlier; Bob was a master in maintaining educational stability," said former Baltimore Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro III, who named him to the school post.
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 12, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Turning aside an appeal by the state of Maryland in a child sex abuse case, the Supreme Court refused yesterday to clarify judges' power to exclude individual spectators from the courtroom during a trial.Without comment, the justices left intact a ruling in May by the Maryland Court of Appeals that it is unconstitutional to exclude relatives of the accused person from a part of the trial, unless persuasive reasons are given for doing so.During the trial in Baltimore City Circuit Court of Johnny Walker of Baltimore, prosecutors asked that Walker's family be kept out of the courtroom while two girls -- 17 and 12 -- testified against him.Walker was on trial for child abuse and second-degree sexual offense against the girls, and prosecutors contended that the two girls would be intimidated because Walker's relatives had discussed aspects of the case with them.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
Rarely do drug traffickers pick up their phones and openly conduct their business, plainly stating the quantities of drugs they would like to buy and prices they would like to pay. Instead, they generally use coded language in an attempt to obscure their activities. And even when investigators think they know the meaning of the conversations they catch on wiretaps, they still have to convince a jury that they've interpreted the interactions correctly. The difficulty of that job was on display this month in the case of Danilo Garcia, who was accused of trafficking heroin from New York to Baltimore after a long surveillance operation.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | November 4, 1992
Even in a year when voters seemed inclined to "throw the bums out," all nine incumbent appellate court judges on the ballot yesterday were expected to win election to 10-year terms.With no major controversies surrounding the judicial races, five Court of Appeals judges and four Court of Special Appeals judges were expected to win their retention elections.The judges faced no challengers, and all were endorsed by the Maryland State Bar Association.Voters were asked whether the incumbents should be retained for 10-year terms.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
The judges of Maryland's top court are subject to the second-best financial disclosure rules in the country, according to a national study. But the report found that transparency is so bad nationwide that no state got a letter grade higher than "C. " Though the study by the Center for Public Integrity said the state compels Court of Appeals judges to submit plenty of financial data, it said that information is of limited use because it is difficult...
NEWS
February 12, 1992
In Baltimore, Howard and Kent counties, judges of the state's most important level of trial court, the Circuit Court, are having to run for election this year.Why? Well, because they're there. It is certainly not because they are bad judges. They are all well-respected by their peers and the legal profession -- and even the would-be judges running against them acknowledge they have good records.But in Maryland, these are the only judgeships lawyers can run for. The state constitution sensibly insulates the lower level -- District Court -- and upper levels -- Court of Special Appeals, Court of Appeals -- from election politics.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 27, 2006
David Who? Why didn't our esteemed judges on the Maryland Court of Appeals ask that question? Essentially, they've done just that in the death of David McGuinn. Who's David McGuinn? Don't be embarrassed if you've forgotten. Our Court of Appeals judges clearly have, and they don't seem one bit ashamed of the fact. That's probably because right about now, they're feeling really noble about themselves with their decision to stop executions in Maryland. At least until public hearings are held on why strapping a killer to a gurney and injecting him with lethal drugs constitutes cruel and unusual punishment.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | June 21, 1993
BILL CLINTON'S final decision on naming a Supreme Court justice came down to a choice between two federal court of appeals judges. Eisenhower's Revenge.Democratic presidents have usually chosen justices from the ranks of politicians and ex-politicians, not from the ranks of judges.In this century, Democratic presidents have nominated 20 justices, only three of whom were judges at the time. Even Republicans before Ike usually chose non-judges. Of 16 Republican-picked justices 1900-1953, four were federal judges and three were state judges.
NEWS
June 6, 1993
Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt and Education Secretary Richard Riley are the latest possibilities for the Supreme Court. The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday that "officials" say they are "among a small group of candidates that the president )) is considering to succeed retiring Justice [Byron] White." Lyle Denniston of The Sun reported last month that "sources" said Richmond attorney Gerald Baliles was under consideration.We like one thing about all three. They're former governors.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
A federal appeals judge recently took aim at the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives' use of fictitious drug robbery schemes to secure lengthy prison sentences for would-be rip off crews, strongly criticizing the practice in a written opinion. The so-called reverse stings follow a pattern: An informant or undercover agent poses as a disgruntled courier and invites a group of people to rob his employer of a half-million dollars or so worth of drugs. But Judge Stephen Reinhardt wrote that such tactics raise important issues about wealth inequality in the United States and whom authorities decide to pursue.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
The judges of Maryland's top court are subject to the second-best financial disclosure rules in the country, according to a national study. But the report found that transparency is so bad nationwide that no state got a letter grade higher than "C. " Though the study by the Center for Public Integrity said the state compels Court of Appeals judges to submit plenty of financial data, it said that information is of limited use because it is difficult...
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
State officials have announced the addition of the first new judgeships since 1977 for the Court of Special Appeals, the state's second-highest court. Lawyers and judges can begin to apply for the two newly created seats. Appointments by Gov. Martin O'Malley will bring the number of special appeals judges to 15. Applications are due in by Aug. 7 and the panel that advises O'Malley will begin screening candidates after that. In the past 35 years, the court's workload has grown by nearly 40 percent and individual judges' caseloads by nearly 42 percent, according to the Department of Legislative Services.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
A lawsuit challenging both the Maryland Court of Appeals ruling that pit bulls are "inherently dangerous" and a Baltimore landlord's decision to ban the animals from its property to avoid liabilities created under the ruling was recently amended to include the state's governor, attorney general and chief appeals judge as defendants. Gov. Martin O'Malley, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Chief Judge Robert M. Bell are all being sued personally but within their official capacities, according to the amended complaint, which was filed Sunday night.
EXPLORE
January 27, 2012
Three cheers for county prosecutors' plans to appeal a judge's dismissal of charges against a woman accused of driving under the influence of alcohol because, the judge ruled, the police had illegal quotas for issuing DUI citations. It was a misguided decision and should be overturned. On Jan. 5, District Court Judge Sue-Ellen Hantman dismissed a case involving an Ellicott City woman who had been stopped for speeding and then found to have a blood-alcohol content more than twice the legal limit.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2011
The state's highest court has returned a rape case to Howard County courts, telling judges there to determine whether police violated the rights of a teenager who was convicted of sexually assaulting a woman. In an unusual decision, the unanimous Court of Appeals ruling neither overturns nor upholds the 2008 rape conviction of Dedrick Tyrone Wilkerson, nor his 12-year prison sentence. Whether Wilkerson is entitled to a new trial will depend on whether a Howard County judge believes the second statement Wilkerson gave police in December 2007 violated his rights.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2004
After a four-year salary freeze, Maryland's judges are seeking a pay raise of up to $30,000 over four years for some members of the bench, a request that appears to have support from top legislative leaders for at least some level of increase. Speaking before the House Appropriations Committee yesterday, senior judges and advocates for the pay raises told lawmakers that the talent pool is evaporating because salaries in Maryland's judiciary are falling behind other jurisdictions and pale in comparison to those in the private sector.
NEWS
December 23, 1991
Last week's decision by state Court of Appeals judges to allow district and circuit court judges to choose between giving up five vacation days or returning a week's salary to ease the state's budget crisis was reasonable and wise.Judges are given 27 paid vacation days a year, and during those periods the state must hire retired judges to fill in for them: The volume of cases is such that the system simply would break down if courtrooms stood empty whenever a regular judge was out. Since the substitute judges must be paid for their time, the initial plan envisioned cutting vacation days for regular judges as a way of saving on the cost of their replacements.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2011
Maryland's highest court on Thursday granted a new manslaughter trial to Ricky Savoy, saying that a jury instruction in his Baltimore trial in the 1993 death of Marvin Watts was improper. In a 5-2 ruling that overturned the conviction, the majority of the Court of Appeals judges wrote that a jury instruction lowered prosecutors' burden of proof from the familiar "beyond a reasonable doubt," which is what is constitutionally required. A judge told them that proof was also to be to a "moral certainty," which was explained as "based upon convincing grounds of probability.
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