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Appalachian Trail

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NEWS
April 1, 2010
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. - Development is threatening the narrow but resource-rich Appalachian trail, and the National Park Conservation Association says more must be done to protect it. In a report released Wednesday, the association said threats include subdivisions, power lines, quarries, wind farms, racetracks, illegal all-terrain vehicle use and mountain bikes. All along the 2,178-mile trail, the report says, decisions about projects must consider "the special and fragile character" of the trail.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
BOONSBORO -- In three months on the Appalachian Trail, Jim Parkins has met a federal judge, a doctor, countless Boy Scouts, marijuana-smoking college graduates, and a married couple who celebrate their anniversary each year by feeding hikers for a week. "People who would never talk to each other in the world get along great," said Parkins, a 53-year-old resident of Derby, Conn., as he rested his legs and smoked a cigarette near Annapolis Rock, a popular landmark with a spectacular view of the Cumberland Valley.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
BOONSBORO -- In three months on the Appalachian Trail, Jim Parkins has met a federal judge, a doctor, countless Boy Scouts, marijuana-smoking college graduates, and a married couple who celebrate their anniversary each year by feeding hikers for a week. "People who would never talk to each other in the world get along great," said Parkins, a 53-year-old resident of Derby, Conn., as he rested his legs and smoked a cigarette near Annapolis Rock, a popular landmark with a spectacular view of the Cumberland Valley.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
No offense to conventional hotels, but sometimes you just want to stay someplace a little different, a little avant-garde, someplace you'll be able to tell the grandkids about someday. You know, someplace that, once you post a picture on Facebook, will make every one of your 732 friends positively green with envy - or at least scratching their heads, wondering how you ever found this place. (And preferably, someplace that won't require taking out a second mortgage to get there and hang out for a few days - which, regrettably, precludes anything atop Mount Kilimanjaro.)
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2011
When Jennifer Pharr Davis makes her way though Maryland on the Appalachian Trail this summer, don't blink or you'll miss her. The North Carolina hiking specialist is trying to break her own speed record of 57 days, 8 hours, 35 minutes — an average of 38 miles per day — as she attempts to go from Maine to Georgia. Davis, who began her trek Thursday, expects to cover no more than four miles every 60 minutes, uphill and down, in rain or sun, alone or in the company of others, from sun's first light until it winks out below the horizon.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1996
Elroy J. Snouffer, a Baltimore lawyer and accountant who hiked the 2,000-mile Appalachian Trail without ever spending a night in a sleeping bag, died Monday of heart failure at his Lansdowne home. He was 78.Mr. Snouffer began hiking the Appalachian Trail in 1965, but he didn't do it all at once. He'd select a section of the trail he wanted to hike, then he and his wife would drive to the chosen point. He'd hike and she'd meet him at the other end.Although such an unorthodox approach pegged him as a novice "day hiker" in the eyes of serious hikers, Mr. Snouffer, a carefree and jocular soul, was unmoved.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 6, 2000
Tockie Baker has driven 185,856 miles in the name of hiking, give or take a tank of gas or two. Once a week for nearly 22 years, she has traveled from her home in north Baltimore County to Harpers Ferry, W.Va., the headquarters of the Appalachian Trail Conference. What Baker does when she gets there isn't glamorous - greeting visitors, answering phones and e-mails, selling maps and books about the world's most famous footpath. But the work she does is vital to the nonprofit organization, mostly because she does it for free.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | May 23, 1991
NEW BLOOMFIELD, Pa. -- Beside a country meadow in central Pennsylvania, next to an Amish buggy maker's shop, lies the modest grave of Molly Ann LaRue.She is buried beside her grandfather, beneath fresh daisies and a gray granite stone that tells when she lived -- Feb. 10, 1965-Sept. 13, 1990 -- and how: "A life shared with children, art and nature."Molly LaRue and her boyfriend, Geoffrey Hood, were murdered last year on the Appalachian Trail, about 70 miles from where she is now buried. As the trial for their alleged killer proceeds here, it has provided a bittersweet glimpse into the final days of the two young lovers -- and the close-knit community of hikers who shared their near-mystical affection for the path.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2000
DUNCANNON, Pa. - James and Connie LaRue and Glenda Hood climbed to the summit of Cove Mountain on the Appalachian Trail yesterday to dedicate a new shelter where their children were killed a decade ago. Hood, of Signal Mountain, Tenn., and the LaRues, of Cleveland. walked more than two hours over rocky terrain to reach the shelter dedicated to the memory of Geoffrey Hood and Molly LaRue. The parents were walking the same path that their children hiked in 1990. Geoffrey Hood and Molly LaRue were the eighth and ninth hikers slain on the Appalachian Trail since 1968, when Congress established it as a national trail.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1997
Long-distance hikers and weekend warriors who share the quiet beauty of the Appalachian Trail as it ambles through Virginia and Maryland are sharing something else this year -- anxiety.Whoever killed two women camping near the trail last spring has not been caught, and federal authorities say they have no suspects."There have been no new developments in quite some time," said FBI spokesman John Donahue. "Most of the leads have been run down, but a few are being reviewed again."Shenandoah National Park rangers found the bodies of Julianna Williams, 24, of St. Cloud, Minn.
NEWS
November 6, 2013
Send sports notices a minimum of two weeks before the requested publication date to Patuxent Publishing/TT Sports Notices, Third floor, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278; e-mail tworgo@tribune.com . Include date, time, location, contact information and subsection. Competitive Ravens Lacrosse Club holds tryouts for 2018, 2019 and 2020 teams, Nov. 16, Friends School. Experienced female field players graduating from high school in 2018 - 2020 are eligible. http://www.ravenslax.org.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 12, 2013
In 1948, three years after the end of World War II, an Army veteran from Pennsylvania named Earl Shaffer hiked the entire length of the Appalachian Trail. No one had ever done that before. Completing the Georgia-to-Maine trek in 124 days, Shaffer became the trail's first "thru-hiker. " He took on the challenge, he said, as a way of recovering from his combat experiences and from the loss of a boyhood friend who had died in the Pacific. Shaffer said he wanted to "walk off the war. " More than 60 years later, the Shaffer legend has inspired a "walk off the war" program for veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan.
NEWS
May 9, 2013
Send sports notices a minimum of two weeks before the requested publication date to Patuxent Publishing/MS Sports Notices, Third floor, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278; e-mail tworgo@tribune.com . Include date, time, location, contact information and subsection. Competitive Waverly Bulldogs Youth Football Team holds registration and football camp, May 9, 23, June 6, 13, 20, 27, July 11, 18, 25, Waverly YMCA grass field, Bulldog teams play in Pop Warner League.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley has thrown some weight behind electing Elizabeth Colbert Busch, sister of comedian and political satirist Stephen Colbert, to Congress. O'Malley is the only governor on a list of more than 30 high-profile Democrats hosting a Colbert Busch fundraiser in Washington, D.C. later this month, according to an invitation to the event obtained by The Baltimore Sun.  Colbert will be a featured guest at the "Colberts United!" benefit, said the invitation, which makes generous use of exclamation points.  O'Malley stumped a little for Colbert Busch last month when he gave the keynote address at a conference of South Carolina Democrats.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | December 27, 1992
SMITHSBURG -- Joe and Audrey Willard hope public opinion will persuade state officials to reconsider plans to relocate the Appalachian Trail through the family farm."
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2000
COLUMBIAN CHUCK Daniels retired after a 31-year career as a computer programmer, his work-world legacy including software designed to help operate all but four of the nation's ubiquitous state lotteries. Since Feb. 7, though, the 60-year-old Daniels has been dealing with an entirely different game -- investing five months in an attempt to hike the famed Appalachian Trail from Georgia to Maine, estimated this year (the distance varies a few miles every year) to be a journey of 2,165 miles.
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