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By Brant James and Brant James,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | August 24, 1997
Growing up around major-league clubhouses taught Jerry Hairston at a young age what it takes to be a professional baseball player. He didn't think he was quite ready after graduating from high school in 1995, so he thanked the Orioles for drafting him with their 42nd pick and went off to college.Now, despite two successful years at Southern Illinois, after which the Orioles drafted him again -- this time in the 11th round -- he still says he's not there yet. But he's getting closer. And the evidence is all over Appalachian League box scores and underscored by the respect the shortstop has commanded in his first 62 pro games at Rookie-level Bluefield.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
BOONSBORO -- In three months on the Appalachian Trail, Jim Parkins has met a federal judge, a doctor, countless Boy Scouts, marijuana-smoking college graduates, and a married couple who celebrate their anniversary each year by feeding hikers for a week. "People who would never talk to each other in the world get along great," said Parkins, a 53-year-old resident of Derby, Conn., as he rested his legs and smoked a cigarette near Annapolis Rock, a popular landmark with a spectacular view of the Cumberland Valley.
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NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1995
Tammy Singer's voice tightens when she talks of barefoot children living in poverty and people without heat during the winter, especially when those people are a day's drive away in the Appalachian regions of Virginia and West Virginia."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
The last thing an orchestra musician expects to do is memorize music - that's for soloists. And even if orchestral members had reason to learn every note of a piece by heart, they wouldn't expect to dance around a stage while playing. Unless they happen to be in the University of Maryland Symphony Orchestra, an ensemble very much open to trying cool new things. One of the coolest is a project that debuted in 2012, when the orchestra performed Claude Debussy's "Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun" from memory while carrying out movements designed by celebrated Baltimore-based choreographer Liz Lerman.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | October 5, 2003
CRAWFORD NOTCH, N.H. - At one end of the building, a mass of rambunctious sixth-graders is learning about geology. At the other, a group from Elderhostel, which runs programs for people 55 and over, readies for its first overnight backpacking trip into the White Mountains. And in between, a hand-lettered sign on the otherwise-bare bulletin board issues this disclaimer: "When it came down to the last minute, we could either make the beds or finish the signs ... " All 122 beds at the Appalachian Mountain Club's new Highland Center are in proper order, I'm pleased to say. The AMC is known for maintaining the hut system in the mountains and for its hiker-friendly Joe Dodge Lodge at the base of 6,288-foot Mount Washington.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON and ERNEST B. FURGURSON,Ernest B. Furgurson is associate editor of The Sun | February 1, 1991
Washington. Out in the Cumberland mountains of eastern Kentucky, where they never have hesitated to do their duty, the Mountain Eagle last week printed the names of 51 Letcher countians serving in the Persian Gulf. One of them was a woman, a sergeant in the 101st Airborne Division.That same day, another 1,100 Kentucky reservists were called to active duty. The former sheriff volunteered to go back on duty. The Pulaski County judge-executive has been called up, and the McCreary County judge-executive, 62 years old, has offered his services.
NEWS
By ALICE CORNETT | June 10, 1993
London, Kentucky -- Is Appalachia losing its histori ''otherness''? Are its boundaries blurring and its people merging into the American mainstream? Crusading Democrats from Eleanor Roosevelt to John Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson and Jay Rockefeller made political hay by their personal commitments to the region, but has anyone heard the word ''Appalachia'' on the lips of candidate or President Bill Clinton?In terms of poverty, the rest of the country is getting to look more and more like Appalachia, so much so that many legislators no longer view the southern mountains as a special region to be nourished with generous infusions of welfare programs.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | May 12, 2002
He died last week at a York Springs, Pa., veterans hospital of liver cancer. Earl Shaffer was the first man to walk from Georgia to Maine on the Appalachian Trail in one trek. But his death, at 83, received little or no notice. Shaffer was famous, but he didn't wear his achievements on the outside of his pack. He didn't like a lot of fuss. He also didn't like people snoring in trail shelters. Yes, he was crotchety. But in a good way. He loved the songs "San Antonio Rose" and "Polka Dots and Moonbeams" for their key changes and strong beat.
NEWS
April 1, 2010
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. - Development is threatening the narrow but resource-rich Appalachian trail, and the National Park Conservation Association says more must be done to protect it. In a report released Wednesday, the association said threats include subdivisions, power lines, quarries, wind farms, racetracks, illegal all-terrain vehicle use and mountain bikes. All along the 2,178-mile trail, the report says, decisions about projects must consider "the special and fragile character" of the trail.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | November 3, 1991
The Appalachian Trail is the longest marked path in the world, stretching more than 2,100 miles from Maine to Georgia along the spine of the Appalachian Mountains.Maryland can claim only 38 miles of the AT, from Pen-Mar in Washington County, to its Potomac River crossing at Harpers Ferry -- and all but six of those miles are protected by the National Park Service and the Department of Natural Resources under the Maryland Appalachian Trail Protection Plan.The DNR and the NPS have scheduled a public meeting at the Greenbrier State Park visitors center on Nov. 12 to present several proposed routes for the AT near Route 77 in the Smithsburg area, including those last six miles.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | April 18, 2014
Et cetera Sagamore filly wins $100,000 stakes race Sagamore Racing homebred Daring Dancer, a 3-year-old filly ridden by jockey Alan Garcia , won the $100,000 Appalachian Stakes on Thursday at Keeneland in Lexington, Ky., in her first start of the year. She completed the 1-mile distance on the turf in 1 minute, 36.04 seconds and paid $12.60. It was Daring Dancer's third consecutive win. Ripken Baseball: New Zealand and Puerto Rico were added to the international division teams playing in the 15th annual Cal Ripken World Series this summer.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | March 31, 2014
If there's strength in numbers, the New York Chamber Soloists are in great shape. This 13-member ensemble of strings, winds, piano and harpsichord is large by chamber music standards, so it promises to assert itself on stage for a Candlelight Concert Society program on Saturday, April 5, at 7 p.m. at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. On the scene for over five decades, the New York Chamber Soloists have performed for Candlelight before. The group's upcoming "American Classics" program features modern American composers.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 12, 2013
In 1948, three years after the end of World War II, an Army veteran from Pennsylvania named Earl Shaffer hiked the entire length of the Appalachian Trail. No one had ever done that before. Completing the Georgia-to-Maine trek in 124 days, Shaffer became the trail's first "thru-hiker. " He took on the challenge, he said, as a way of recovering from his combat experiences and from the loss of a boyhood friend who had died in the Pacific. Shaffer said he wanted to "walk off the war. " More than 60 years later, the Shaffer legend has inspired a "walk off the war" program for veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
If there is a single work that captures the essence of America in sound and movement, it's "Appalachian Spring," the ballet with music by Aaron Copland and choreography by Martha Graham that premiered in 1944 at the Library of Congress. Although the sonic part of the piece is never out of earshot, thanks to the perennially performed orchestral suite Copland fashioned from the score, the opportunity to experience the music and dance in its original form doesn't come around every day. Since last fall, students at the Baltimore School for the Arts have been delving into the ballet from every angle, preparing for "An Appalachian Spring Festival," an interdisciplinary project that includes an art exhibit, a concert and panel discussions.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2012
For those looking to get outdoors before going indoors to watch the Orioles and Ravens on television Sunday, the Appalachian Trail Conservancy wants you. As part of the National Public Lands Day, the ATC Visitor Center in Harpers Ferry, W.Va., is hosting its second-annual Family Hiking Day from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. next Saturday. Admission is free. According to Javier Folgar, marketing and communications manager for the ATC, the activity in Harpers Ferry grew out of the national event.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2011
Mathilde B. "Mimi" Lee, who as the wife of Lt. Gov. Blair Lee III eschewed the political pomp and circumstance of Annapolis for the fields and woods where she could hike, canoe and swim, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at Laurel Regional Hospital. The Silver Spring resident was 91. Mathilde Boal was named for her paternal grandmother, who was related to Christopher Columbus. Her father, Pierre de Lagarde Boal, was an American diplomat who had served as ambassador to Nicaragua and Bolivia.
NEWS
By SUE HALLER | August 23, 1994
The countdown has begun. Parents have only six days until they send their youngsters back to school and houses all over the area grow quiet again.Let's remember to drive carefully and be on the lookout for kids walking to school and school buses filled with kids.*The adult Appalachian Service Project group of Community United Methodist Church of Crofton will be sponsoring a yard sale from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday in the church parking lot off Riedel Road.Rental spaces are still available for $10. Each space is 3 feet by 8 feet and includes a table.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Staff Writer | August 2, 1992
A good time to schedule a trip to Virginia is early August during the Virginia Highlands Festival in Abingdon. The festival, which opened yesterday and runs through Aug. 16, is one of the state's most popular festivals, attracting thousands of visitors from all over the country and even from abroad.This year marks its 44th anniversary, which means it is one of the state's oldest festivals as well. It is a celebration of the cultural traditions of the Appalachian region, with hundreds of events, including concerts, art and photography shows, traditional and modern dance performances, storytelling, theater and comedy.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2011
When Jennifer Pharr Davis makes her way though Maryland on the Appalachian Trail this summer, don't blink or you'll miss her. The North Carolina hiking specialist is trying to break her own speed record of 57 days, 8 hours, 35 minutes — an average of 38 miles per day — as she attempts to go from Maine to Georgia. Davis, who began her trek Thursday, expects to cover no more than four miles every 60 minutes, uphill and down, in rain or sun, alone or in the company of others, from sun's first light until it winks out below the horizon.
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