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By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 5, 2000
TEARS AND laughter filled Wilde Lake Interfaith Center on Sunday as a group of Howard County residents from the Church of St. John the Evangelist United Methodist-Presbyterian and St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Community shared their experiences after a week's work on the Appalachia Service Project in Tennessee. ASP is a home-repair and home-building ministry affiliated with the United Methodist Church. The organization invites high school and college groups, individuals and families from all denominations to assist with the housing needs of economically disadvantaged people in Appalachia.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 31, 2014
Cover your eyes and hide the kids: A Republican is talking poverty. This has not been a pretty picture in the recent past. Who can forget then-South Carolina Lt. Gov. Andre Bauer likening poor people to animals one feeds from the back door and Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning calling them stray raccoons? And let's not even get into Mitt Romney's wholesale slander of the so-called "47 percent. " So one receives with a certain trepidation the news that Romney's running mate, Rep. Paul Ryan, has issued a proposal aimed at curbing poverty.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 29, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Residents of Appalachia, one of the poorest areas of the United States, are more likely to die from heart disease than people living elsewhere, a new study by researchers at West Virginia University has found.The authors of the 100-page report said a lack of medical facilities in the region and a lack of emphasis on nutrition and exercise contribute to a higher level of heart problems in Appalachia.Elizabeth Barnett, an assistant professor at the West Virginia University school of medicine who led the study group, said researchers found that white Appalachians between ages 35 and 64 had a 15 percent to 20 percent greater chance of dying from heart disease than white Americans living elsewhere.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,sun reporter | September 27, 2005
DELMONT, Pa.-- --David Hill's forehead is gashed, his fingernails are caked with grease, the outline of a Copenhagen tobacco tin is traced in filth on the pocket of his mud-drenched T-shirt - and he couldn't be happier, because he is drilling another well. "It's a real boom time for natural gas drilling, and I'm working rain, shine, heat, cold, 24 hours a day, year-round," said Hill, owner of a 50-foot-tall rig that is punching a pipe deep into rolling farmland east of Pittsburgh for the Penneco Oil Co. With natural gas prices soaring to record levels, wildcatters are drilling new wells throughout the Appalachian region.
NEWS
By Francis X. Clines and Francis X. Clines,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 23, 2002
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. - Some bibulous rustics call it white lightning, others call it 'shine, while the more soul-struck prefer a snort of holy water. Whatever your designated poison, it is the crystal-clear corn liquor of Appalachia, the illegal essence of three centuries of mountain hollow stills. Payton D. Fireman, a local lawyer with a taste for marketing, has begun bottling and selling the volatile potion legally for the first time in state memory under the label Mountain Moonshine. "Of course it's rough: It's moonshine," said Fireman to a visitor brought bolt upright and teary-eyed by a shot of the clear white whiskey.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 14, 1997
TEN YOUNG PEOPLE from Severna Park recently returned from a week in Dungannon, Va., not vacationing in the Appalachian village, but helping to renovate the home of a needy family -- and paying $165 each for the privilege.Rachel Santora, Ted Harries, John Lebowitz, Greg Bauer, Jon Coslick, Kiersten Klein, Katie Leigh, Lorne Rickert, Alexa Santora and Mike Tuozzo, members of the senior high youth group at Our Shepherd Lutheran Church volunteered to work with the Commission on Religion in Appalachia.
FEATURES
By Lauren E. Wilbert and Lauren E. Wilbert,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 26, 2003
WASHINGTON - Rich Kirby has heard all the negative stereotypes about Appalachian people, such as ignorant, uneducated, naive and inbred. Kirby, a Kentucky native, hopes to correct those perceptions when people see the true spirit and tradition of people from the region at the 2003 Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington, which started yesterday. The festival - "Appalachia: Harmony and Heritage" - focuses on the mountains of Virginia, Kentucky, West Virginia, Tennessee and North Carolina.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 31, 2014
Cover your eyes and hide the kids: A Republican is talking poverty. This has not been a pretty picture in the recent past. Who can forget then-South Carolina Lt. Gov. Andre Bauer likening poor people to animals one feeds from the back door and Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning calling them stray raccoons? And let's not even get into Mitt Romney's wholesale slander of the so-called "47 percent. " So one receives with a certain trepidation the news that Romney's running mate, Rep. Paul Ryan, has issued a proposal aimed at curbing poverty.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | April 23, 1992
A local church is not usually the place to go when your car needs anoil change.This Sunday, however, the job is just one of those being auctioned off at the Severna Park United Methodist Church. The proceeds will help send 50 church members to Appalachia this summer, where they'll repair homes for needy people.The auction, which begins at 6 p.m. in the church's Fellowship Hall, includes a catered meal, a grass-cutting, a day on the bay, the painting of a room and dozens of other selections.
NEWS
By JONI GUHNE | July 28, 1994
Many Central County young people know how to handle a hammer and saw because of the Severna Park United Methodist Church annual Appalachia Project.Church Youth Director Lee Ferrell, who has headed local participation in the national mission program for a dozen years, led this year's group of 45 youths and 13 adults and young adults.To her, the most important aspect of the project is not that the young people are eager to work under the hot sun from early morning to late afternoon for five long days repairing homes.
NEWS
By James Gorman and James Gorman,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 20, 2003
It stretches from the forests of New England to the farmlands of the Mid-Atlantic, from woodlands where bobcats scream and cerulean warblers warble to lawns where deer and groundhogs graze. More than 4.5 million people drink water drawn from its aquifers. Fourteen million people use it each year for recreation, more than visit Yellowstone, Yosemite and the Grand Canyon combined. Twenty-five million people live within an hour's drive. It has been mapped, studied and reported on. Conservationists are trying to preserve as much of it as possible.
FEATURES
By Lauren E. Wilbert and Lauren E. Wilbert,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 26, 2003
WASHINGTON - Rich Kirby has heard all the negative stereotypes about Appalachian people, such as ignorant, uneducated, naive and inbred. Kirby, a Kentucky native, hopes to correct those perceptions when people see the true spirit and tradition of people from the region at the 2003 Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington, which started yesterday. The festival - "Appalachia: Harmony and Heritage" - focuses on the mountains of Virginia, Kentucky, West Virginia, Tennessee and North Carolina.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 2002
USING HAMMERS, saws and drills, members of two congregations that meet at Wilde Lake Interfaith Center helped improve the lives of families in Virginia through the Appalachia Service Project. Since 1969, high school youth participating in the program have spent part of their summers offering assistance to low-income families in rural central Appalachia. The teens are trained in home-repair skills and receive sensitivity training to help them understand the culture and the needs of those they serve.
NEWS
By Francis X. Clines and Francis X. Clines,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 23, 2002
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. - Some bibulous rustics call it white lightning, others call it 'shine, while the more soul-struck prefer a snort of holy water. Whatever your designated poison, it is the crystal-clear corn liquor of Appalachia, the illegal essence of three centuries of mountain hollow stills. Payton D. Fireman, a local lawyer with a taste for marketing, has begun bottling and selling the volatile potion legally for the first time in state memory under the label Mountain Moonshine. "Of course it's rough: It's moonshine," said Fireman to a visitor brought bolt upright and teary-eyed by a shot of the clear white whiskey.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 5, 2000
TEARS AND laughter filled Wilde Lake Interfaith Center on Sunday as a group of Howard County residents from the Church of St. John the Evangelist United Methodist-Presbyterian and St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Community shared their experiences after a week's work on the Appalachia Service Project in Tennessee. ASP is a home-repair and home-building ministry affiliated with the United Methodist Church. The organization invites high school and college groups, individuals and families from all denominations to assist with the housing needs of economically disadvantaged people in Appalachia.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 29, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Residents of Appalachia, one of the poorest areas of the United States, are more likely to die from heart disease than people living elsewhere, a new study by researchers at West Virginia University has found.The authors of the 100-page report said a lack of medical facilities in the region and a lack of emphasis on nutrition and exercise contribute to a higher level of heart problems in Appalachia.Elizabeth Barnett, an assistant professor at the West Virginia University school of medicine who led the study group, said researchers found that white Appalachians between ages 35 and 64 had a 15 percent to 20 percent greater chance of dying from heart disease than white Americans living elsewhere.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1995
Tammy Singer's voice tightens when she talks of barefoot children living in poverty and people without heat during the winter, especially when those people are a day's drive away in the Appalachian regions of Virginia and West Virginia."
FEATURES
By Syd Kearney and Syd Kearney,Houston Chronicle | September 18, 1994
The morning sun is seeping through the weathered wooden walls of the Bunch homestead, and the porch offers a lazy moan as a visitor inspects the century-old construction.General Bunch shared this two-room cabin in Norris, Tenn., with his parents and 11 siblings. "I was just 8 years old but I drug the logs in from the mountains with a yoke of oxen," Bunch once recalled. "We was 12 miles from the nearest store where we could buy a bag of salt."Although Bunch is gone now, his stories are alive and are as much a part of the Museum of Appalachia as his beloved cabin.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 19, 1998
The pitch begins much like any come-on to lure people to the picturesque area where the Smokies meet the Blue Ridge Mountains, the latest alternative for retirees and others wishing to relocate."
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 14, 1997
TEN YOUNG PEOPLE from Severna Park recently returned from a week in Dungannon, Va., not vacationing in the Appalachian village, but helping to renovate the home of a needy family -- and paying $165 each for the privilege.Rachel Santora, Ted Harries, John Lebowitz, Greg Bauer, Jon Coslick, Kiersten Klein, Katie Leigh, Lorne Rickert, Alexa Santora and Mike Tuozzo, members of the senior high youth group at Our Shepherd Lutheran Church volunteered to work with the Commission on Religion in Appalachia.
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