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By Cal Thomas | March 10, 2012
The first apology by Rush Limbaugh, posted on his website over the weekend, sounded forced, qualified, almost defensive. The second, broadcast live on his Monday show, sounded sincere and heartfelt. Rush Limbaugh did something not usually associated with either himself or bombastic talk radio. He apologized for calling a woman a "slut" and a "prostitute. " The woman, 30-year-old Sandra Fluke, a law student at Georgetown University, wants the Catholic school to pay for contraceptives in its insurance policy because, she says, she and her friends cannot afford the cost otherwise.
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NEWS
September 12, 2014
I appreciate Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti's thorough and sincere explanation on behalf the Ravens with respect the treatment of Ray Rice ( "Steve Bisciotti writes that Ravens should have done more to investigate Ray Rice video," Sept. 10). The role of the league in both the investigation leading to the suspension ruling in July as well the reaction after the interior elevator video was released would typically fall outside an individual owner's explicit purview and as such the understated references with regard the NFL will have to speak for themselves.
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NEWS
November 12, 2012
Mike Preston should give the Ravens' Brendon Ayanbadejo an "F" for sensitivity ("Brendon Ayanbadejo on same-sex marriage passing: 'I'm so stoked, it's like I woke up and it was Christmas,'" Nov. 7). It is insensitive that Mr. Ayanbadejo would compare the passing of same-sex marriage to the religious celebration of the birth of Jesus Christ. Compare it to your birthday. Compare it to the morning after a big Ravens victory. But comparing it to a holy day is a ridicule to many of the opponents of Question 6. To be clear, I did not vote for Question 6. I do understand the position of those who did. I am not challenging that debate here.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Organizers of this weekend's Otakon anime convention in Baltimore apologized Friday after glitches in processing registrations left thousands standing outside the downtown convention center for hours on Thursday. Those who had pre-registered for the three-day convention went to the Baltimore Convention Center Thursday to pick up their access badges and convention materials, and organizers said they were able to process about 10,000 people. But an estimated 7,000 to 8,000 attendees waited until nearly midnight before being turned away, organizers said.
NEWS
July 7, 2010
This is it. I've had it. I am outraged. What chutzpah! The article in The Baltimore Sun ("Israeli leader's 'makeup visit'," July 6) stated in a headline: "Obama expected to urge Netanyahu to issue apology for raid." I couldn't believe what I was reading. An apology, just to have a picture taken together? There is nothing for Mr. Netanyahu to apologize for--unless Mr. Obama thinks that violating blockades during wartime is okay, or allowing in people who call themselves "humanitarian or peace activists" who were linked to and/or are supporters of Hamas, Syria and Al Qaeda or were mercenaries paid to provoke the Israeli soldiers who attempted to inspect the cargo and/or identify the people on board to see if they were smuggling weapons or terrorists.
NEWS
November 22, 2010
As an airborne veteran of the Korean War, I feel the Community College of Baltimore County owes Charles Whittington a public apology and reinstatement ( "Fight for freedom," Nov. 21). The combat veteran had written an honest essay about his Iraq service. If the administration decided to remove all people who harbored private thoughts (and wrote about them), we may be bailing out another educational institution. On November 11(Veteran's Day), many people would have saluted and thanked Mr. Whittington for his service to his country.
NEWS
November 8, 2011
What would a hon do in this situation? Denise Whiting, the Café Hon owner who roiled a city by trademarking its signature term of endearment, who sought to micromanage the kitsch (and free speech) at a street festival, and who at various points claimed to have more or less codified hon culture, has apologized and promised to give up her legal claim, whatever it truly was, to the commercial use of the word "hon. " Would a hon turn the other heavily-rouged cheek? Probably, but it's going to take some time for Ms. Whiting to erase the ill will she needlessly brought on herself.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
A legislative ethics committee on Monday recommended a reprimand for an Anne Arundel County lawmaker it said lobbied and voted for a measure that would make it easier for him to regain his real estate license. The committee's report found Republican Del. Tony McConkey failed to disclose a conflict of interest or abstain from voting when he should have. Aides said the House of Delegates is expected to address the report by the Joint Committee on Legislative Ethics on Tuesday. The report recommends House Speaker Michael E. Busch request a public apology to the House.
NEWS
March 7, 2012
Tell Norman Wolfe ("Quran burning: Obama isn't the one who should be apologizing," March 2) that if you step on someone's toes, you apologize. If you run over someone's cat, you apologize. If you accidentally incinerate someone's book, especially a holy book, you apologize. Then you have laid the groundwork for countering or reacting to whatever vengeance the injured party has unjustly taken. I think humility is a virtue. Respect for the other party, no matter how unjust or evil that party may be, is the preferred first step in a course of action.
NEWS
November 24, 2012
If the editors of The Sun believe that a recently-issued apology by the Howard County school board ("Howard school board apologizes for segregation," Nov. 16) that relates to treatment of African-American students 49 years ago warrants front page above the fold coverage, it cannot be considered to be a serious newspaper. Philip G. Enstice, Ellicott City
NEWS
August 4, 2014
Thanks for Jacob Simpson's well written commentary on the absurdity of what goes on in the sports world ( "Ray Rice is not a victim," July 31). We, the public, are duped over and over again by carefully crafted responses. The mighty dollar speaks every time. I do not feel Ray needed to get in front of the world to apologize to his wife; it's something he should have worked out with her privately, not in front of the cameras. But since he did go in front of the cameras, as other athletes have, just once I would like to hear them say: "I sinned.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Yesterday was the biggest media circus in Baltimore in years, and we all survived. Here are the fruits of it in the Coffee Companion, where we recap the local sports headlines from the previous day. - Ravens running back Ray Rice's first public comments since his two-game suspension for his domestic assault arrest went over well yesterday, with Mike Preston saying the apology was the first step towards forgiving the veteran running back...
SPORTS
Mike Preston | July 31, 2014
Ravens running back Ray Rice apologized to his wife Thursday. That's one thing he had to do before most of us could respect him again and allow him to move on with his life. Now, let the healing process begin. We may not forget, but forgiving becomes a lot easier when the words "I'm sorry" are mentioned. "Last time I didn't publicly apologize to my wife, and I realized that hit home with a lot of people," Rice said. "There's many nights that me and my wife sleep together and we still have to deal with this.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
Composed and seemingly contrite, Ravens running back Ray Rice apologized to his wife, Janay, and insisted that their physical altercation in February was a one-time incident from which he has grown. He also vowed to become a vocal advocate against domestic violence when the time is right. Taking questions from reporters Thursday for the first time since he was arrested and accused of striking his then-fiancee unconscious at an Atlantic City, N.J., casino in February, Rice said many of the things that people hoped to hear when he broke his silence in May. “My actions that night were totally inexcusable,” Rice said in Thursday's news conference, held after the team's training camp practice.
NEWS
June 25, 2014
I initially felt "way to go" when I read Susan Reimer 's column about women apologizing ( "What are women apologizing for?" June 23). However, with deeper contemplation I began to wonder if women apologize more because they are more polite. That they care about other's feelings. That our male friends are perhaps a little too brusque and quick to move on without regard to what feelings they have left behind. Dovey Kahn, Pikesville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | June 23, 2014
"Sorry. " It's a verbal crutch women often use instead of "I didn't hear what you said," or "Excuse me. " A way of being extra polite. It is also the subject of a new ad campaign by Procter & Gamble, the makers of Pantene hair products, which shows women at work and at home who seem to be apologizing for even existing. A woman prefaces a question at a meeting with "sorry, but. " Another young woman apologizes before entering someone's office. A mother says "sorry" as she hands off her son to his father so she can get dinner out of the fridge.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
In the wake of an accusation he "accosted" a voter, Anne Arundel County Councilman John Grasso on Monday apologized to people who watched him "draw a line in the sand. " Grasso gave a three-minute speech at the start of Monday night's council meeting apologizing to witnesses of a confrontation between himself and a voter who later complained to elections officials that the councilman berated him and called him an idiot while his kids stood nearby. It was one of several complaints elections officials said they received about Grasso's behavior outside a Glen Burnie early voting center in October.
SPORTS
February 22, 2010
A more human Woods Dave Hyde, Sun Sentinel This was a Tiger Woods we had never seen. Human. Sincere. Contrite. Within the admittedly cool and controlling confines of his personality, he seemed like a person trying to get his patch of life in order. He said all that could be said. He used words like "deeply sorry" and "irresponsible" and "selfish." He said, "I'm the only one to blame." He also gave as good and simple an explanation of how he lost his way. "I felt that I had worked hard my entire life and deserved to enjoy all the temptations around me," he said.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Manny Machado was given the opportunity to speak to his team in a meeting before Monday's game against the Boston Red Sox at Camden Yards. Like he has now done publicly, the Orioles third baseman apologized. “Today, with the meeting, we just got to get focused, get back on track and get back to what we need to do,” Machado said after Monday's 4-0 win over the Boston Red Sox. “You go up there and say what you are feeling. I went up there and apologized to everybody here.” Machado earned national scrutiny for three incidents in the series against the Oakland Athletics over the weekend.  In the series opener Friday, he took objection to a tag by third baseman Josh Donaldson and started an argument that resulted in the benches clearing.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
After a weekend of calling fellow horse owners "cowards" and "cheaters" for running fresh entrants in the Belmont Stakes, California Chrome co-owner Steve Coburn said Monday that he needed to apologize "to the world," including the connections of winner Tonalist. Appearing on "Good Morning America" with his wife, Carolyn, Coburn told host Robin Roberts that "I'm very ashamed of myself. " California Chrome was trying to become the 12 th Triple Crown winner in Saturday's Belmont, but he finished tied for fourth . Tonalist, a horse who skipped the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes because he spiked a fever before the Derby, won a close race over Commissioner, another horse who didn't run in the first two legs of the Triple Crown.
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