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By DAVID HINCKLEY and DAVID HINCKLEY,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 20, 2006
NEW YORK -- The first time Aretha Franklin came to Harlem to play the Apollo Theater, she was impressed before she got into the building. "I remember looking down 125th Street and thinking I had never seen that many people in one place in my whole life," recalls Franklin, who returns to the Apollo tonight and tomorrow for the first time in 20 years, headlining a pair of Black Music Month galas. "On the sidewalk, just going about their business, they must have been six or seven deep. Back in Detroit, I'd never seen anything like that."
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FEATURES
December 17, 2009
TROUBLE IN PARADISE: A pair of professional thieves fall in love in the Riviera in Ernst Lubitsch's 1932 comedy starring Herbert Marshall and Miriam Hopkins. The screening takes place at the Charles Theatre, 1711 N. Charles St., at 9 p.m. Tickets are $8. Call 410-727-3456 or go to thecharles.com. DREAMGIRLS: The all-new production of the feel-good musical about a '60s girl group sensation premiered at the Apollo Theater in November before coming to The Hippodrome, 12 N. Eutaw St. Even though it's pretty hard to top Jennifer Hudson as Effie in the 2006 film version, there are enough show-stopping hits to bring you to your feet.
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NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2000
The hallowed stage of New York City's legendary Apollo Theater has launched many a musical career over the decades. Billie Holiday and Count Basie performed there as amateurs in the 1930s. Other performers have included Sammy Davis Jr., Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles and 1999 Grammy-award darling, Lauryn Hill. Yesterday, with visions of joining those legends dancing in their heads, more than 70 Baltimore-area children between ages 5 and 12 showed up downtown at the Port Discovery children's museum to try to dance or sing their way into a spot on the children's segment of the weekly television show, "It's Showtime at the Apollo."
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | December 29, 2006
NEW YORK -- Thousands jammed 125th Street and waited in line for hours yesterday to pay their respects to James Brown, the Godfather of Soul, whose body lay inside Harlem's Apollo Theater. On the stage of the historic building, the Rev. Al Sharpton, a longtime friend, stood near the head of the casket, speaking occasionally to people passing by in a slow, deliberate procession. Some took pictures; others simply looked and moved on. Brown's music blared through the air. Later, at an evening program for family and close friends, Sharpton said it was difficult to believe that a man who was "so much alive" was dead.
FEATURES
December 17, 2009
TROUBLE IN PARADISE: A pair of professional thieves fall in love in the Riviera in Ernst Lubitsch's 1932 comedy starring Herbert Marshall and Miriam Hopkins. The screening takes place at the Charles Theatre, 1711 N. Charles St., at 9 p.m. Tickets are $8. Call 410-727-3456 or go to thecharles.com. DREAMGIRLS: The all-new production of the feel-good musical about a '60s girl group sensation premiered at the Apollo Theater in November before coming to The Hippodrome, 12 N. Eutaw St. Even though it's pretty hard to top Jennifer Hudson as Effie in the 2006 film version, there are enough show-stopping hits to bring you to your feet.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1997
Hasim Rahman won't sing, dance or tell jokes, but the unbeaten Baltimore heavyweight promises to put on a great show in his debut at the Apollo Theater Nov. 1 on HBO's "Boxing After Dark" Series.Rahman (23-0) will be making history in battling fourth-ranked Obed Sullivan (28-1-1) KOs). It will be the first fight staged at the storied showplace in Harlem, N.Y., where performers like Ella Fitzgerald and Richard Pryor first became famous."Believe me, it's not going to be amateur night," Rahman said.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | December 29, 2006
NEW YORK -- Thousands jammed 125th Street and waited in line for hours yesterday to pay their respects to James Brown, the Godfather of Soul, whose body lay inside Harlem's Apollo Theater. On the stage of the historic building, the Rev. Al Sharpton, a longtime friend, stood near the head of the casket, speaking occasionally to people passing by in a slow, deliberate procession. Some took pictures; others simply looked and moved on. Brown's music blared through the air. Later, at an evening program for family and close friends, Sharpton said it was difficult to believe that a man who was "so much alive" was dead.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 13, 2002
THEY WALKED through the doors of the Loew's Theaters at White Marsh last Thursday afternoon. They looked young, like teen-agers. They must have been high school students. But they were so quiet, so orderly, they couldn't have been. What was going on here? A little checking revealed these were, indeed, high school students. From Edmondson High School. (You may know it as Edmondson-Westside High School, but no true Edmondson alumnus will call it that. In deference to all those who graduated from the 45-year-old institution, let's leave it Edmondson High School.
NEWS
April 23, 1993
Steve DouglasSaxophonistLOS ANGELES -- Saxophonist Steve Douglas, who played with performers ranging from Sam Cooke and Elvis Presley to Barbra Streisand Frank Sinatra, collapsed and died of heart failure Monday during a recording session at a Hollywood studio.Mr. Douglas, 55, whose real name was Steven Kreisman, played the blues with Duane Eddy and the Rebels at Harlem's famed Apollo Theater in 1958, and with Elvis Presley on the set of the early 1960s movie "Girls, Girls, Girls."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ishita Singh | July 24, 2008
Lyfe Jennings R&B singer Lyfe Jennings comes to Baltimore on his first-ever tour, "Baby I'm a Star." The up-and-comer has filled venues like the Apollo Theater in New York City and the Superdome in New Orleans with his soulful voice and lyrics that serve as keen social commentary, born out of a 10-year stay in prison. Unlike previous releases, Jennings' newest album, Lyfe Change, includes collaborations with different producers, creating a new sound. Ray Lavender, Yolanda Renee and DJ P Funk join Jennings on Sunday at Sonar, 407 E. Saratoga St. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets are $25-$30.
FEATURES
By DAVID HINCKLEY and DAVID HINCKLEY,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 20, 2006
NEW YORK -- The first time Aretha Franklin came to Harlem to play the Apollo Theater, she was impressed before she got into the building. "I remember looking down 125th Street and thinking I had never seen that many people in one place in my whole life," recalls Franklin, who returns to the Apollo tonight and tomorrow for the first time in 20 years, headlining a pair of Black Music Month galas. "On the sidewalk, just going about their business, they must have been six or seven deep. Back in Detroit, I'd never seen anything like that."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 13, 2002
THEY WALKED through the doors of the Loew's Theaters at White Marsh last Thursday afternoon. They looked young, like teen-agers. They must have been high school students. But they were so quiet, so orderly, they couldn't have been. What was going on here? A little checking revealed these were, indeed, high school students. From Edmondson High School. (You may know it as Edmondson-Westside High School, but no true Edmondson alumnus will call it that. In deference to all those who graduated from the 45-year-old institution, let's leave it Edmondson High School.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2000
The hallowed stage of New York City's legendary Apollo Theater has launched many a musical career over the decades. Billie Holiday and Count Basie performed there as amateurs in the 1930s. Other performers have included Sammy Davis Jr., Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles and 1999 Grammy-award darling, Lauryn Hill. Yesterday, with visions of joining those legends dancing in their heads, more than 70 Baltimore-area children between ages 5 and 12 showed up downtown at the Port Discovery children's museum to try to dance or sing their way into a spot on the children's segment of the weekly television show, "It's Showtime at the Apollo."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1997
Hasim Rahman won't sing, dance or tell jokes, but the unbeaten Baltimore heavyweight promises to put on a great show in his debut at the Apollo Theater Nov. 1 on HBO's "Boxing After Dark" Series.Rahman (23-0) will be making history in battling fourth-ranked Obed Sullivan (28-1-1) KOs). It will be the first fight staged at the storied showplace in Harlem, N.Y., where performers like Ella Fitzgerald and Richard Pryor first became famous."Believe me, it's not going to be amateur night," Rahman said.
NEWS
January 24, 2004
William J. Chestnut, a retired chauffeur and gospel singer, died of renal failure Sunday at Union Memorial Hospital. The Northeast Baltimore resident was 72. Mr. Chestnut was born and raised in Green Sea, S.C., and moved to Baltimore in the 1950s. He was a meatpacker for Albert F. Goetz Inc. and Dukeland Packing Co. Inc. before going to work as a chauffeur for Frederick P. Winner Distributing Co. in 1981. He retired in 1992. For more than 20 years, Mr. Chestnut, a tenor, had been a member and served as manager of the CBS Trumpeteers, a gospel group.
NEWS
June 18, 1996
NO SINGER covered so wide a range of jazz and popular music as did Ella Fitzgerald, who died over the weekend at 79. She rose to fame during the swing era, excelled at scat, was present at the birth of be-bop and recorded an amazing array of music from bossa nova and gospel to anthologies of American popular standards.To the general public, these "songbooks" of Cole Porter, Rodgers and Hart, Duke Ellington, Irving Berlin, George and Ira Gershwin, Harold Arlen, Jerome Kern and Johnny Mercer are the best-known part of Ms. Fitzgerald's rich legacy.
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