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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2004
James Fraher, an engineer and retired Hubble Space Telescope manager, died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, Sunday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Towson resident was 75. Born in New York City, he moved at age 6 to Abbeyside, Ireland, the place of his parents' birth. He attended a Christian Brothers school and learned to speak Gaelic fluently. He was active in Boy Scouting, attaining the rank of Eagle and organizing a village gang called the Black Flash.
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By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2013
To visit the new national park proposed by a Maryland congresswoman would require a 239,000-mile journey and an oxygen tank. On the plus side: There would be plenty of parking. Rep. Donna Edwards, the top-ranking Democrat on the House Space Subcommittee, has introduced legislation that would establish a national park on the surface of the moon to commemorate NASA's Apollo program. The Apollo Lunar Landing Legacy Act directs the federal government to endow the artifacts left on the moon's surface as a park - protected from future landings or commercial mining.
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NEWS
July 20, 1994
Twenty-five years ago today men walked on the moon for the first time. It was an epochal event in human history that produced a rich harvest of scientific knowledge.Neil A. Armstrong, Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin and the 10 astronauts who followed them during the Apollo program brought back a total of about 840 lbs. of lunar soil and rocks. The material recovered from those missions helped settle many basic questions about the moon's origin, its composition and even the early conditions that affected life on Earth.
NEWS
By Ajay Kothari | September 17, 2012
I still remember - although details are somewhat cloudy now, the gist of it is still clear as bell - the night when my teen and toddler brother and sisters, my father, some workers on the farm and I sat around a fire, on a somewhat cold night, in the middle of a jungle, and, with an occasional roar of a panther in the background, listened to a decrepit old radio. It was the late 60's in Western India, on my father's farm, and we were all very excited. We were trying very hard to listen, amid heavy static, to the live broadcast of a NASA capsule splash-landing in the ocean, after a journey around the moon.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 31, 1991
While many products, from automobiles to appliances, have been redesigned to reduce weight, when it comes to spacesuits for astronauts, the nation's space program has left the weight issue behind.During NASA's Apollo space program in the 1960s and 1970s, weight was a major concern because of the gravity involved in lunar missions. But in flying shuttle missions, gravity is no longer an issue.In a weightless environment, heavier, cheaper materials can be used in spacesuits, said the Hamilton Standards division of United Technologies Corp.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2013
To visit the new national park proposed by a Maryland congresswoman would require a 239,000-mile journey and an oxygen tank. On the plus side: There would be plenty of parking. Rep. Donna Edwards, the top-ranking Democrat on the House Space Subcommittee, has introduced legislation that would establish a national park on the surface of the moon to commemorate NASA's Apollo program. The Apollo Lunar Landing Legacy Act directs the federal government to endow the artifacts left on the moon's surface as a park - protected from future landings or commercial mining.
NEWS
By Peter Pae | September 20, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- NASA has unveiled an ambitious blueprint for sending humans back to the moon, an Apollo-like task that is expected to take 13 years and cost $104 billion. In a much anticipated announcement yesterday, NASA said it plans to ground the space shuttle in 2010 and begin replacing it two years later with a reusable spacecraft resembling the Apollo capsule that first took U.S. astronauts to the moon in 1969. "Think of it as Apollo on steroids," NASA Administrator Michael D. Griffin said during a news conference at the agency headquarters in Washington.
NEWS
January 8, 2001
Ronald W. Magness, 62, worked on Apollo program Ronald W. Magness, whose long career at defense contractor AAI Corp. included work with the Apollo space program, died Thursday of heart failure at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 62 and had lived in Hamilton for 37 years. During his more than 40-year career at Hunt Valley-based AAI, Mr. Magness helped design the lunar landing simulator used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's manned Apollo program during the late 1960s and early 1970s, said his daughter, Karen H. Weisman of Royal Oak. He also helped train astronauts who used the equipment.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | July 10, 1994
After planting his boots on the moon, the first thing Neil Armstrong did was scoop up some pebbles and stuff them in a pocket, just in case he had to make a quick getaway. Retrieval of lunar soil was the chief scientific aim of the Apollo program, which mobilized an army of engineers and scientists, enlisted America's industrial might and, at its peak, consumed 1 percent of the nation's gross national product.Today, two scientists are trying to persuade NASA to let them retrieve rocks from another extraterrestrial object.
NEWS
March 25, 1995
A RECENT front-page story by Sun staff writer Rafael Alvarez on the City Life Museum's search for objects d'Bawlmer got us to wondering:With so many folks living in the suburbs, someone is bound to start a Suburban Life Museum. But stocked with what?* A strip of vinyl siding.* A tiny hexagonal sign warning that children and pets should keep off the freshly chemically treated lawns.* Orange pylons from kids' soccer leagues.* Supermarket register tapes for school computer funds.* Happy Meal gewgaws and/or Chuck E Cheese tokens.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun Reporter | January 2, 2007
James Ludlow Decker, a retired aeronautical engineer who helped design the Gemini spacecraft and who served as a deputy manager for the Apollo space program in Houston, died Dec. 27 of complications from a stroke at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Baldwin resident was 83. Born in Batavia, N.Y., Mr. Decker moved to Baltimore after graduating from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1945. He took a job with Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River, where he oversaw the aviation company's aerodynamics staff and preliminary design engineering.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,SUN REPORTER | January 1, 2007
James Ray Sebring Sr., an engineer who designed radio communications hardware for the Apollo space program, died Dec. 22 of an infection at University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 73 and lived in Sparks. Born in Cherry Tree, Pa., Mr. Sebring attended public schools and served in the Navy as a radioman from 1951 to 1955. While studying for an undergraduate degree in electrical engineering at Pennsylvania State University, he met Anna Marie DeMay at a Sunday afternoon dance. After dating for two years, the couple married in 1959, two weeks after Mr. Sebring earned his bachelor's degree.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | November 4, 2005
When astronaut Fred Haise talks to audiences about his experience on the ill-fated Apollo 13 mission in April 1970, he likes to quote a number to his audiences: 400,000. That is the number of people who worked on the Apollo program, including contractors and subcontractors, he told listeners at Howard Community College this week. "Very few people appreciate the number of people who worked on the program," he said. "They have no idea what it took." At the lecture Tuesday, which was part of HCC's celebration of its opening in 1970, Haise talked about the team effort involved in all of the Apollo missions.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | October 4, 2005
It looks like Apollo. And, if Congress foots the bill, NASA's proposed "Crew Exploration Vehicle" would fly astronauts to the moon and back in 2018 pretty much the way Apollo did in 1969. The similarities have some Americans wondering why the space agency would spend more than $100 billion to repeat something we mastered when Richard Nixon was president. "It seems like buying a used car," said Charles County resident Dudley N. Thompson, in a recent letter to The Sun. The plan "largely ignores Mars and focuses on an achievement we attained 35 years ago."
NEWS
By Peter Pae | September 20, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- NASA has unveiled an ambitious blueprint for sending humans back to the moon, an Apollo-like task that is expected to take 13 years and cost $104 billion. In a much anticipated announcement yesterday, NASA said it plans to ground the space shuttle in 2010 and begin replacing it two years later with a reusable spacecraft resembling the Apollo capsule that first took U.S. astronauts to the moon in 1969. "Think of it as Apollo on steroids," NASA Administrator Michael D. Griffin said during a news conference at the agency headquarters in Washington.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2004
James Fraher, an engineer and retired Hubble Space Telescope manager, died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, Sunday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Towson resident was 75. Born in New York City, he moved at age 6 to Abbeyside, Ireland, the place of his parents' birth. He attended a Christian Brothers school and learned to speak Gaelic fluently. He was active in Boy Scouting, attaining the rank of Eagle and organizing a village gang called the Black Flash.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | November 4, 2005
When astronaut Fred Haise talks to audiences about his experience on the ill-fated Apollo 13 mission in April 1970, he likes to quote a number to his audiences: 400,000. That is the number of people who worked on the Apollo program, including contractors and subcontractors, he told listeners at Howard Community College this week. "Very few people appreciate the number of people who worked on the program," he said. "They have no idea what it took." At the lecture Tuesday, which was part of HCC's celebration of its opening in 1970, Haise talked about the team effort involved in all of the Apollo missions.
NEWS
January 8, 2001
Ronald W. Magness, 62, worked on Apollo program Ronald W. Magness, whose long career at defense contractor AAI Corp. included work with the Apollo space program, died Thursday of heart failure at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 62 and had lived in Hamilton for 37 years. During his more than 40-year career at Hunt Valley-based AAI, Mr. Magness helped design the lunar landing simulator used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's manned Apollo program during the late 1960s and early 1970s, said his daughter, Karen H. Weisman of Royal Oak. He also helped train astronauts who used the equipment.
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