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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 30, 1995
"Apollo 13" is the squarest movie Hollywood has made since "The Longest Day," and in many ways it celebrates the same values: teamwork, labor, valor and commitment to mission. Set in the '70s, it's the best '50s movie of the '90s.Astutely, Ron Howard's film avoids the big temptations. To begin with, there's no overlay of revisionist irony, no spirit of poking fun at the rigid code of the military and science professionals who got the job done. The early '70s aren't sentimentalized into an epoch of lost American innocence or a comical sideburn/Nehru-jacket paradise; it's seen as those who were there then saw it, which is to say, as reality, not a wiggy time trip.
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By Matthew Olshan | July 19, 2010
Late last week my eyes were glued to my Internet browser, where a strange and sometimes baffling underwater ballet was unfolding. Perhaps you were watching the live video feeds from the BP oil well spill, too. I watched with a mixture of revulsion and pride. Revulsion at the sight of the filthy plume of oil that had been poisoning the Gulf of Mexico for nearly three months; and pride in the ingenuity of the engineers who designed the cap that finally shut it off, and in the team that was executing the mission with cool heads and steady hands.
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FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | July 26, 1995
To me, the most amazing thing about "Apollo 13," the runaway hit movie, is that I have virtually no memory of "Apollo 13," the actual event.I'm not talking amnesia here.What I'm saying is that when it happened, it barely registered.This doesn't make sense, if you've seen the movie. Three guys are up in space. They're in trouble. They might not make it back. They might, well, die up there. The whole word should be holding its breath.But I don't remember any breath-holding.I remember -- or maybe I remember, I'm not sure -- thinking that the NASA science-geeks with the pencils and slide rules in the shirt pocket will get our boys back.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN REPORTER | October 6, 2006
You've seen Apollo 13. You can recite The Right Stuff from memory. There isn't a Discovery Channel documentary you haven't devoured. What does a space addict do next? For many, there's only one person they can count on for a fix: a former TV station manager turned full-time NASA film sleuth named Mark Gray. Gray spends his days doggedly tracking down rare and little-seen government film from the golden age of the U.S. space program - the first manned Mercury missions through the early days of the space shuttle.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch | January 8, 1995
The Apollo astronauts were a team of chisel-jawed Ah-mur-i-cans, the best test pilots of the richest, most powerful nation in history.They shot into space atop rockets the size of office buildings, spun around the moon and plopped onto its surface, leaving bootprints on soil devoid of any other form of life. They traveled in hideously complex, experimental craft. And they rushed to beat a deadline set by a martyred president, who promised they would explore the lunar landscape by 1970.Why, then, did these first voyages of discovery to our cosmic next-door neighbor seem so tedious?
FEATURES
By Jeff Guinn and Jeff Guinn,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | July 24, 1995
Back home in Texas, Jim Lovell is a "reasonably" happy man.It has been almost four weeks since the release of "Apollo 13," a cinematic re-enactment of the heroics of Mr. Lovell and two crew mates as they overcame in-space disaster to get back to Earth safely. Mr. Lovell, 64, is pleased by the movie's box office success and said it comes as something of a surprise."I never expected the film to do so well at all," he said from his secluded home near Marble Falls, Texas. "It came as a windfall after the book.
FEATURES
By Douglas Bailey and Douglas Bailey,Boston Globe | July 9, 1995
Rob Legato's favorite astronaut is Buzz Aldrin.The second man on the moon unwittingly bestowed the highest praise on special-effects supervisor Legato last month after viewing a preview of "Apollo 13." Wandering over to director Ron Howard after the screening, Mr. Aldrin had some questions about the footage used in the film -- particularly the stunning shots of the Brobdingnagian Saturn V rocket lifting majestically off the pad.Mr. Aldrin had never seen those shots before and wanted to know from what NASA archive the film had been retrieved.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 7, 2005
HOLLYWOOD - "It's big news," Tom Hanks is proclaiming in jest. "This is massive!" Kidding aside, the decade-old movie to which Hanks refers is the Oscar-winning Apollo 13, just out in a special two-disc anniversary edition DVD (Universal, $23). The discs feature the original widescreen and Imax versions of the box-office hit about the near-fatal 1970 space mission, commentary with director Ron Howard and Apollo 13 commander Jim Lovell and his wife, Marilyn, and three documentaries. "There is an awful lot of stuff on the DVD, both the movie and the history" of the space missions, he says.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | November 4, 2005
When astronaut Fred Haise talks to audiences about his experience on the ill-fated Apollo 13 mission in April 1970, he likes to quote a number to his audiences: 400,000. That is the number of people who worked on the Apollo program, including contractors and subcontractors, he told listeners at Howard Community College this week. "Very few people appreciate the number of people who worked on the program," he said. "They have no idea what it took." At the lecture Tuesday, which was part of HCC's celebration of its opening in 1970, Haise talked about the team effort involved in all of the Apollo missions.
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | July 27, 1996
What a difference 26 years makes. In 1970, Commander Jim Lovell lived through one of the most dramatic events in space history when an explosion rocked the moon-bound Apollo 13. The three-man crew's harrowing trip home was a triumph of human ingenuity and teamwork, made famous again last summer when Tom Hanks played Lovell in the movie "Apollo 13."There was far less heart-stopping suspense this week when Lovell came to Baltimore to promote public interest in space. Just compare the film version of his life to Lovell's decidedly down-to-earth marathon press tour.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | November 4, 2005
When astronaut Fred Haise talks to audiences about his experience on the ill-fated Apollo 13 mission in April 1970, he likes to quote a number to his audiences: 400,000. That is the number of people who worked on the Apollo program, including contractors and subcontractors, he told listeners at Howard Community College this week. "Very few people appreciate the number of people who worked on the program," he said. "They have no idea what it took." At the lecture Tuesday, which was part of HCC's celebration of its opening in 1970, Haise talked about the team effort involved in all of the Apollo missions.
NEWS
October 9, 2005
Water main work to begin along U.S. 1 County workers are scheduled to begin tomorrow the replacement of about three miles of water main along U.S. 1 between Meadowridge Road and Montgomery Road in Elkridge. The project in expected to be complete in December 2006. The project is intended to improve water service in the area, which has been troubled by water main breaks because of corrosive soils in the area, officials said. "The department is aware that this project will inconvenience the driving public," James Irvin, director of the Department of Public Works, said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 7, 2005
HOLLYWOOD - "It's big news," Tom Hanks is proclaiming in jest. "This is massive!" Kidding aside, the decade-old movie to which Hanks refers is the Oscar-winning Apollo 13, just out in a special two-disc anniversary edition DVD (Universal, $23). The discs feature the original widescreen and Imax versions of the box-office hit about the near-fatal 1970 space mission, commentary with director Ron Howard and Apollo 13 commander Jim Lovell and his wife, Marilyn, and three documentaries. "There is an awful lot of stuff on the DVD, both the movie and the history" of the space missions, he says.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2000
For the past month or so, people driving by Jim Long's yellow bungalow on Old Washington Road have stopped to inquire about the airplane parked in his carport. "Does it fly?" they ask about the model of the Spirit of St. Louis, the silvery Ryan monoplane Charles Lindbergh flew nonstop from New York to Paris for 33 1/2 hours in May 1927. "Did you make it? What kind of engine is that anyway?" Long, who can usually be found tinkering under the plane's 25-foot wingspan, has his answers ready.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | April 23, 2000
"Failure is Not an Option: Mission Control from Mercury to Apollo 13 and Beyond," by Gene Kranz. Simon & Schuster. 339 pages. $26. If you weren't up that night listening to the Apollo 13 mission on the radio, you surely heard astronaut Jim Lovell's chilling words replayed the next day: "OK Houston, we have a problem." What you never heard were the near-desperate words of flight director Gene Kranz 10 minutes later, in a private phone call to his boss, Chris Kraft. Kraft was home in the shower when conditions on the crippled, moon-bound spacecraft began cascading toward disaster.
NEWS
By Max Obuszewski | October 15, 1997
SOME TEN YEARS ago, the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory worked on a long-term Navy contract for the Aegis Combat Systems. On July 3, 1988, the USS Vincennes, a Navy warship with an Aegis battle-management system, shot down an Iranian airliner over the southern Persian Gulf after mistaking it for an attacking fighter jet. All 290 people on board were killed.Accidents are inevitable, despite scientific guarantees to the contrary. One unpredictable factor is human error, which contributed to the nuclear power accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl and the Hubble Space Telescope mishap.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 15, 1997
With all the hubbub over the Mars Pathfinder and that little rover gizmo, perhaps it's easy to forget there was once a day when rockets actually carried men to other worlds.MPT, Channels 22 and 67, revisits those heady days of the Apollo program tonight. "Apollo 13: To the Edge and Back" (8 p.m.-9: 30 p.m.) is a compelling, edge-of-your-seat look at the ill-fated Apollo 13 mission, which ended with three men trying to jerry-rig something that would enable them to travel a few million miles through space with precious little oxygen.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | July 27, 1995
Washington. -- History may well remember this as the summer when ''Apollo 13'' was the most popular movie and House Speaker Newt Gingrich's ''To Renew America'' topped the best-seller list.Is this a coincidence? Is there a connection? What does this say about America today?Last week ''Apollo 13'' was the highest grossing film for the fourth straight week, topping $111 million in total receipts and still climbing. ''It's not supposed to happen that a movie does business like this,'' says Brian Grazer, its producer.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 15, 1997
With all the hubbub over the Mars Pathfinder and that little rover gizmo, perhaps it's easy to forget there was once a day when rockets actually carried men to other worlds.MPT, Channels 22 and 67, revisits those heady days of the Apollo program tonight. "Apollo 13: To the Edge and Back" (8 p.m.-9: 30 p.m.) is a compelling, edge-of-your-seat look at the ill-fated Apollo 13 mission, which ended with three men trying to jerry-rig something that would enable them to travel a few million miles through space with precious little oxygen.
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | July 27, 1996
What a difference 26 years makes. In 1970, Commander Jim Lovell lived through one of the most dramatic events in space history when an explosion rocked the moon-bound Apollo 13. The three-man crew's harrowing trip home was a triumph of human ingenuity and teamwork, made famous again last summer when Tom Hanks played Lovell in the movie "Apollo 13."There was far less heart-stopping suspense this week when Lovell came to Baltimore to promote public interest in space. Just compare the film version of his life to Lovell's decidedly down-to-earth marathon press tour.
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