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July 20, 1994
The post office issued a pair of new stamps today to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the first moon landing.The stamps depicting an astronaut on the moon's surface come in 29-cent and $9.95 values, for First Class mail and Express Mail use.These are the latest stamps honoring the Apollo 11 mission. Story, 9A.
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NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff | July 20, 2009
I was watching the bright half-moon last week, slowly fading in the light of the morning sun. The space program has grown opaque in the same way after two Apollo 11 astronauts first walked on the moon 40 years ago today. It even came to seem half a program. The shuttle stagecoaches in Earth orbit have attracted less and less national interest except when the Challenger exploded in 1986 and the Columbia in 2003. I was at Cape Kennedy four days before the Apollo 11 liftoff. In a predawn hour, Neil Armstrong, Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin and Michael Collins walked past us going to work, carrying their air conditioners.
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NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Sun Staff Writer | July 10, 1994
Mankind landing on another heavenly body for the first time sounds like the story of the 20th Century. Viewed from a later, space-faring century, it might yet be.It doesn't seem so today. Oddly, given the event, it didn't seem so when it happened. In July 1969, the event of Apollo 11 was such an emotional overload that I made sense only out of disconnected images, not the least of them mortality and why some people watch car races.Three hours before the Saturn V rocket lighted up and roared toward the moon, reporters stood outside crew quarters at 6:25 a.m. as Neil A. Armstrong, then Michael Collins, then Edwin Aldrin strode past us 15 feet away.
FEATURES
By Lea Lion and Lea Lion,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 15, 2008
HOLLYWOOD - Not screened Mirrors, a thriller about an ex-cop who discovers secrets hidden in reflections, was not screened for critics. If you were around in July 1969, chances are you remember exactly where you were when Apollo 11, the first manned mission to the moon, touched down and astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin Jr. took their first steps there. Now the Eagle has landed again, reimagined, for a new generation. The 3-D animated film Fly Me to the Moon tells the tale of a young fly named Nat who stows away aboard Apollo 11 with a couple of his buddies and accompanies Armstrong on the moonwalk.
NEWS
By Newsday | July 21, 1994
WASHINGTON -- America paid tribute to the astronauts of Apollo 11, but the heroes of the space program had some challenging words for the country.In contrast to a presidential speech that focused largely on the space program's earthly benefits, Neil Armstrong urged American youth yesterday to be visionary in their outlook, while his Apollo 11 crew mate Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin lamented the country's "withered capacity for wonder."President Clinton and Mr. Armstrong spoke at a White House ceremony marking the 25th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2004
A New York auction of more than 300 pieces of space memorabilia took in more than $443,000 over the weekend, including $18,400 paid by a Scarsdale lawyer for a plastic toothbrush carried to the moon by Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin. But two of the most poignant items in the sale - a flight suit and helmet offered by the family of Columbia astronaut David Brown - were withdrawn after NASA told the family the equipment was still government property. Officials at Swann Galleries said the two Brown items had been expected to sell for at least $48,000.
FEATURES
By Lea Lion and Lea Lion,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 15, 2008
HOLLYWOOD - Not screened Mirrors, a thriller about an ex-cop who discovers secrets hidden in reflections, was not screened for critics. If you were around in July 1969, chances are you remember exactly where you were when Apollo 11, the first manned mission to the moon, touched down and astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin Jr. took their first steps there. Now the Eagle has landed again, reimagined, for a new generation. The 3-D animated film Fly Me to the Moon tells the tale of a young fly named Nat who stows away aboard Apollo 11 with a couple of his buddies and accompanies Armstrong on the moonwalk.
NEWS
February 2, 2003
The shuttle Columbia was named after another ship that explored new frontiers for America, a sloop based in Boston that sailed around the world more than 200 years ago. The ship Columbia had sailed from Boston to the Pacific Northwest when Capt. Robert Gray assumed command and took the Columbia on to Canton in China, carrying a cargo of otter skins. He returned to Boston in 1790. The river Columbia, along the Washington-Oregon border, was also named for the ship, according to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
NEWS
By NEIL McALEER | July 17, 1994
On July 20, 1969, Neil Alden Armstrong, a shy, soft-spoken test pilot from Wapakoneta, Ohio -- the all-American boy personified -- stepped off the ladder and took his first "small step" on the moon that symbolized a "giant leap" for humanity.After a dangerous descent and historic touchdown -- the "moment of significance" for Mr. Armstrong -- the press speculated on who thought up the astronaut's historic words, "That's one small step for a man, and one giant leap for mankind." Mr. Armstrong was so shy and uncomfortable in front of cameras and microphones, often searching for the next word during long silences, that some reporters doubted the phrase was his. But it was."
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN REPORTER | October 6, 2006
You've seen Apollo 13. You can recite The Right Stuff from memory. There isn't a Discovery Channel documentary you haven't devoured. What does a space addict do next? For many, there's only one person they can count on for a fix: a former TV station manager turned full-time NASA film sleuth named Mark Gray. Gray spends his days doggedly tracking down rare and little-seen government film from the golden age of the U.S. space program - the first manned Mercury missions through the early days of the space shuttle.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | June 13, 2007
William Sinkabine Miller, a retired medical research scientist who helped run the 1969 Apollo 11 lunar mission's post-flight quarantine lab, died of cancer Sunday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Timonium resident was 80. Born in Berryville, Va., he earned a bachelor's degree in microbiology at the University of Maryland, College Park and a doctorate from George Washington University. He studied at the Harvard Business School and served in the Air Force in Japan. Throughout the 1950s and 1960s, Dr. Miller worked in military biological testing at Fort Detrick in Frederick.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN REPORTER | October 6, 2006
You've seen Apollo 13. You can recite The Right Stuff from memory. There isn't a Discovery Channel documentary you haven't devoured. What does a space addict do next? For many, there's only one person they can count on for a fix: a former TV station manager turned full-time NASA film sleuth named Mark Gray. Gray spends his days doggedly tracking down rare and little-seen government film from the golden age of the U.S. space program - the first manned Mercury missions through the early days of the space shuttle.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2004
A New York auction of more than 300 pieces of space memorabilia took in more than $443,000 over the weekend, including $18,400 paid by a Scarsdale lawyer for a plastic toothbrush carried to the moon by Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin. But two of the most poignant items in the sale - a flight suit and helmet offered by the family of Columbia astronaut David Brown - were withdrawn after NASA told the family the equipment was still government property. Officials at Swann Galleries said the two Brown items had been expected to sell for at least $48,000.
NEWS
February 2, 2003
The shuttle Columbia was named after another ship that explored new frontiers for America, a sloop based in Boston that sailed around the world more than 200 years ago. The ship Columbia had sailed from Boston to the Pacific Northwest when Capt. Robert Gray assumed command and took the Columbia on to Canton in China, carrying a cargo of otter skins. He returned to Boston in 1790. The river Columbia, along the Washington-Oregon border, was also named for the ship, according to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1999
Thirty years after the first men landed on the moon, the Apollo mission continues on a lonely mountaintop in West Texas. Five or six times a month, scientists in an old trailer at the McDonald Observatory near Fort Davis point a 30-inch telescope at one of three old Apollo landing sites on the moon, and fire a burst of laser light. If they've aimed well, their green needle of light strikes one of three briefcase-sized reflectors the moon-walkers left behind. It bounces back to Texas and down the throat of the telescope By precisely timing the light's round trip -- about 2 1/2 seconds -- scientists can measure, to within 1 1/2 inches, the distance between the telescope and the moon.
NEWS
By Newsday | July 21, 1994
WASHINGTON -- America paid tribute to the astronauts of Apollo 11, but the heroes of the space program had some challenging words for the country.In contrast to a presidential speech that focused largely on the space program's earthly benefits, Neil Armstrong urged American youth yesterday to be visionary in their outlook, while his Apollo 11 crew mate Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin lamented the country's "withered capacity for wonder."President Clinton and Mr. Armstrong spoke at a White House ceremony marking the 25th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | June 13, 2007
William Sinkabine Miller, a retired medical research scientist who helped run the 1969 Apollo 11 lunar mission's post-flight quarantine lab, died of cancer Sunday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Timonium resident was 80. Born in Berryville, Va., he earned a bachelor's degree in microbiology at the University of Maryland, College Park and a doctorate from George Washington University. He studied at the Harvard Business School and served in the Air Force in Japan. Throughout the 1950s and 1960s, Dr. Miller worked in military biological testing at Fort Detrick in Frederick.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | July 16, 1994
Think you know it all about the moon walk? Guess again.Twenty-five years ago today, man set off for the moon, beginning a week of unparalleled space mania. So spectacular was the hoopla surrounding the mission that almost every detail became embedded in America's collective memory.Almost, but not all. Did you know that we almost didn't get to watch the mission on live television? Did you know what happened to all the moon rocks? And did you know you may not know the whole story?Bad as the television pictures from the moon may have been -- the camera that recorded those first steps was immobile, the photography was black and white and the images were not all that clear -- things could have been a lot worse.
NEWS
July 20, 1994
The post office issued a pair of new stamps today to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the first moon landing.The stamps depicting an astronaut on the moon's surface come in 29-cent and $9.95 values, for First Class mail and Express Mail use.These are the latest stamps honoring the Apollo 11 mission. Story, 9A.
NEWS
By NEIL McALEER | July 17, 1994
On July 20, 1969, Neil Alden Armstrong, a shy, soft-spoken test pilot from Wapakoneta, Ohio -- the all-American boy personified -- stepped off the ladder and took his first "small step" on the moon that symbolized a "giant leap" for humanity.After a dangerous descent and historic touchdown -- the "moment of significance" for Mr. Armstrong -- the press speculated on who thought up the astronaut's historic words, "That's one small step for a man, and one giant leap for mankind." Mr. Armstrong was so shy and uncomfortable in front of cameras and microphones, often searching for the next word during long silences, that some reporters doubted the phrase was his. But it was."
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