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June 22, 2011
Symptoms of sleep apnea: Excessive daytime sleeping Loud snoring Gasping or choking awakening Awakenings for uncertain reasons Restless sleep Nonrefreshing sleep Poor memory Poor intellectual function irritability Personality changes Morningheadaches Confusion Grinding teeth at night
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SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
Offensive lineman Ryan Jensen hadn't felt like his normal self for a long time. He was visibly groggy from a lack of sleep. He was more irritable than usual. And he didn't feel as energetic as he needed to be on the Ravens' practice field. It turned out there was a reason why. Jensen recently was diagnosed with and treated for severe sleep apnea, a life-threatening disorder when left untreated. It also might have played a role in Jensen's being cut by the Ravens on Saturday after a preseason performance the 2013 sixth-round draft pick from Colorado State-Pueblo wasn't pleased with.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2011
Dr. Lewis B. Newberg, a retired ear, nose and throat specialist who turned his personal battle with sleep apnea and snoring into a book in which he combined humor and practical medical advice for those similarly afflicted, died Oct. 22 of heart failure at his Edgewater home. He was 72. The son of a businessman and a homemaker, Dr. Newberg was born in the Bronx, N.Y., and raised in Jamaica, N.Y., where he was a graduate of public schools. After earning a bachelor's degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, he earned his medical degree in 1964 from the Chicago Medical School.
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | November 13, 2012
While health professionals encourage people to get from seven to eight hours of sleep nightly, millions of Americans are falling well short of that mark. Many are getting just five to six hours and recent studies have shown that more than 20 percent of the population may be suffering from some type of sleep disorder. St. Agnes Hospital now has a renovated and expanded facility dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders. The St. Agnes Sleep Center is open to adults and children as young as 3 years old. The patients are usually referred to the facility by their primary care doctor or cardiologist.
FEATURES
By Sandra Blakeslee and Sandra Blakeslee,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 1995
One of these days, it might pay to locate sleep laboratories next to heart catheterization laboratories, some medical researchers say.The reason is that sleep apnea, a common yet rarely diagnosed problem, is turning out to play a major, insidious role in heart disease, including congestive heart failure, high blood pressure and chest pain. Yet many cardiologists and heart disease patients are not aware of the problem, researchers into apnea have found.A handful of "small but convincing" studies, all reported within the last five years, point to a strong link between heart disease and apnea, said Dr. James Kiley, director of the National Center of Sleep Disorders Research at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 28, 2011
Dr. Lewis B. Newberg, a retired ear, nose and throat specialist who turned his personal battle with sleep apnea and snoring into a book in which he combined humor and practical medical advice for those similarly afflicted, died Oct. 22 of heart failure at his Edgewater home. He was 72. The son of a businessman and a homemaker, Dr. Newberg was born in the Bronx, N.Y., and raised in Jamaica, N.Y., where he was a graduate of public schools. After earning a bachelor's degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, he earned his medical degree in 1964 from the old Chicago Medical School.
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | November 13, 2012
While health professionals encourage people to get from seven to eight hours of sleep nightly, millions of Americans are falling well short of that mark. Many are getting just five to six hours and recent studies have shown that more than 20 percent of the population may be suffering from some type of sleep disorder. St. Agnes Hospital now has a renovated and expanded facility dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders. The St. Agnes Sleep Center is open to adults and children as young as 3 years old. The patients are usually referred to the facility by their primary care doctor or cardiologist.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN | October 7, 2005
Sleep to Save Your Life: The Complete Guide to Living Longer and Healthier Through Restorative Sleep, by Dr. Gerald T. Lombardo (Collins, $24.95). This latest book on the importance of sleep is a good read -- and not just if you're up late trying to doze off. Lombardo, who trained at New York Cornell Hospital, has conducted more than 5,000 sleep studies. He concludes that Americans are suffering from health problems due to inadequate sleep and snoring. Lombardo gives a thorough description of the human sleep cycles and outlines common ailments.
FEATURES
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Boston Globe | July 20, 1993
Some lucky souls sleep like babies, no matter what their age.But for 40 million of us, sleep disorders are a chronic misery, and for 20 to 30 million more, they are an intermittent problem, a national commission on sleep reported recently.All of which might be bearable if we could look forward to sleeping better after the kids leave home, say, or after our midlife crisis is history, or when retirement finally means we don't have to get up early for work.But it doesn't happen that way. Sleep typically gets worse the older we get -- and contrary to popular wisdom, the need for it doesn't decline with age.After age 65, a whopping 52 percent of people who live at home report significant sleep disturbances, according to psychologist Andrew Monjan, chief of the neurobiology of aging division of the National Institute on Aging.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | November 18, 2005
Some people first suspect they have obstructive sleep apnea when their significant other complains about excessive snoring, or tells them they stop breathing many times during the night. Others figure it out when their daytime sleepiness gets so bad they fall asleep at meetings or have a car accident. But many of the 18 million Americans with obstructive sleep apnea don't believe they have it until they're finally tested in a sleep lab, get treatment, usually with a device called CPAP, and then get the first good night's sleep they've had in years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2011
Dr. Lewis B. Newberg, a retired ear, nose and throat specialist who turned his personal battle with sleep apnea and snoring into a book in which he combined humor and practical medical advice for those similarly afflicted, died Oct. 22 of heart failure at his Edgewater home. He was 72. The son of a businessman and a homemaker, Dr. Newberg was born in the Bronx, N.Y., and raised in Jamaica, N.Y., where he was a graduate of public schools. After earning a bachelor's degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, he earned his medical degree in 1964 from the Chicago Medical School.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 28, 2011
Dr. Lewis B. Newberg, a retired ear, nose and throat specialist who turned his personal battle with sleep apnea and snoring into a book in which he combined humor and practical medical advice for those similarly afflicted, died Oct. 22 of heart failure at his Edgewater home. He was 72. The son of a businessman and a homemaker, Dr. Newberg was born in the Bronx, N.Y., and raised in Jamaica, N.Y., where he was a graduate of public schools. After earning a bachelor's degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, he earned his medical degree in 1964 from the old Chicago Medical School.
EXPLORE
June 22, 2011
Symptoms of sleep apnea: Excessive daytime sleeping Loud snoring Gasping or choking awakening Awakenings for uncertain reasons Restless sleep Nonrefreshing sleep Poor memory Poor intellectual function irritability Personality changes Morningheadaches Confusion Grinding teeth at night
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | March 6, 2008
With insurance changes potentially stimulating its market, Sleep Solutions Inc., a Pasadena company that makes home testing equipment for sleep disorders, announced yesterday that it has received $20.5 million in financing from venture capital investors. Sleep Solutions developed a home testing device for obstructive sleep apnea, a breathing condition that affects 15 to 20 percent of the population. Although there are several home testing devices on the market, much of the testing for sleep problems is done in labs, hospitals and medical office buildings, where technicians can oversee the test.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | September 6, 2007
What if you went to bed on time last night, thought you got a good night's sleep, but still woke up feeling tired? You may be suffering from a potentially serious disorder called sleep apnea, says Uday Nanavaty, chief pulmonologist at St. Agnes Hospital. Sleep apnea can cause people to be drowsy and irritable during the day and have difficulty staying awake at school, work or even while driving. The name "sleep apnea" comes from the Greek for "without breath." How do you describe the disorder?
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | May 12, 2006
The only real health problem that 3-year-old Nicholas Salter had was the occasional sore throat. Sometimes, it hurt so much that it was hard to swallow, which cut back on his appetite. And there was one more issue: "He'd snore so loudly you could hear him in his room from the top of the steps," said his mother, Jackie Salter. After two cases of strep throat within a few weeks, doctors recommended a sleep study: hooking Nicholas up to monitors overnight to make sure he was breathing properly and getting enough rest.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | September 6, 2007
What if you went to bed on time last night, thought you got a good night's sleep, but still woke up feeling tired? You may be suffering from a potentially serious disorder called sleep apnea, says Uday Nanavaty, chief pulmonologist at St. Agnes Hospital. Sleep apnea can cause people to be drowsy and irritable during the day and have difficulty staying awake at school, work or even while driving. The name "sleep apnea" comes from the Greek for "without breath." How do you describe the disorder?
FEATURES
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | October 18, 1994
At first, he excused his fatigue as a symptom of advancing age, expanding girth or the rigors of his grinding schedule.There were nights when Del. Howard "Pete" Rawlings struggled to stay awake during the tedious drive home from Annapolis. Or the time the Baltimore Democrat drifted off while dining with friends at an elegant restaurant in Manhattan."He just nodded off," said his wife, Dr. Nina Rawlings, a pediatrician who implored him without success to see a doctor. "I was just glad I was sitting next to him. I kept bumping his knee."
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | November 18, 2005
Some people first suspect they have obstructive sleep apnea when their significant other complains about excessive snoring, or tells them they stop breathing many times during the night. Others figure it out when their daytime sleepiness gets so bad they fall asleep at meetings or have a car accident. But many of the 18 million Americans with obstructive sleep apnea don't believe they have it until they're finally tested in a sleep lab, get treatment, usually with a device called CPAP, and then get the first good night's sleep they've had in years.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN | October 7, 2005
Sleep to Save Your Life: The Complete Guide to Living Longer and Healthier Through Restorative Sleep, by Dr. Gerald T. Lombardo (Collins, $24.95). This latest book on the importance of sleep is a good read -- and not just if you're up late trying to doze off. Lombardo, who trained at New York Cornell Hospital, has conducted more than 5,000 sleep studies. He concludes that Americans are suffering from health problems due to inadequate sleep and snoring. Lombardo gives a thorough description of the human sleep cycles and outlines common ailments.
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