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December 13, 2011
The League of American Bicyclists awarded a bronze Bicycle Friendly Business Award to Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, in North Laurel. APL was recognized for promoting employee health and social responsibility through its cycling club and cycling amenities. Some members of the APL cycling club commute daily and travel more than 24 miles each way.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
When a Virgin Galactic plane designed for space tourism eventually launches, a Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory experiment studying magnetic activity will be on board. The lab's Electronic Field Measurements instrument will be among a dozen experiments that will enter what is known as the "suborbital" region, about 50 miles above Earth's surface, in a NASA-funded mission. A date has not yet been announced for the flight of Virgin's SpaceShipTwo spacecraft. The experiment seeks to study electromagnetic conditions inside the spacecraft to determine what magnetic fields the craft generates itself, independent of Earth's magnetic field.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | January 8, 2010
The Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Lab, near Laurel, is looking for a new director after its current chief, Richard T. Roca, announced Thursday that he is leaving. Roca, 65, took the APL post in January 2000 after a long career at AT&T, including as director of AT&T Labs in New Jersey, the company's research and development arm. APL scientists and engineers conduct research and development with a variety of partners, including the Navy and NASA. The laboratory is currently managing unmanned NASA missions to Mercury and Pluto.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
This year's winter weather is a mere dusting compared to the winter storm that college students are grappling with this weekend at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. Eight teams of students are fending off a massive cyber attack in the midst of a storm more devastating than Maryland's blizzard of 1993, prompting the governor and president to declare states of emergency and deploy aid to residents. The scenario provides the backdrop for the teams competing Friday and Saturday at the ninth annual Mid-Atlantic Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition.
NEWS
March 29, 1995
It is easy in this era of downsizing to lose sight of the full impact of industry layoffs. A ripple effect often reverberates well beyond those workers receiving pink slips, delivering a stinging blow throughout a region's economy.That will likely be the fallout of 350 layoffs at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Scaggsville announced this week. The plan is expected to affect more than 200 of the facility's 2,750 full-time workers and 140 of 700 contractual employees.
NEWS
By Lisa Kawata and Lisa Kawata,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 25, 2004
ONCE A month, at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, a group of employees meets for APL PIE. Served not in the cafeteria but in a classroom, PIE stands for Parent Information Exchange, a support and resource program run by engineers who are passionate about parenting. "We just thought it would be helpful to working parents," said Jay Dettmer, who helped to start the group 15 years ago at the laboratory's North Laurel campus. At that time, Dettmer was going through a separation.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Ivan Penn and Mark Guidera and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writers | March 29, 1995
The planned layoff of 350 workers at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel could presage a new round of job losses at other area defense and aerospace firms, defense and economic analysts say.The cutbacks at one of Maryland's largest defense contractors, effective in August, come at a time when the aerospace industry projects a loss of 34,000 jobs nationally because of a drop in Pentagon and civil aviation spending."
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1995
The first round of layoff notices -- 100 of them -- went out yesterday to temporary contract employees at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory near Laurel.The layoffs are part of a 14 percent work force reduction at Howard County's largest private employer.And more are on the way, as APL prepares to lay off 250 of its own 2,750 staff employees, said Helen Worth, an APL spokeswoman. The next round of notices may go out as early as next week, but no later than the end of May, she said.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers James M. Coram, Mark Guidera and Alisa Samuels contributed to this article | March 28, 1995
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) -- one of the state's largest military contractors and Howard County's largest private employer -- announced yesterday that it will cut its work force by about 350 jobs because of defense-spending cutbacks.The job cuts come just four months after APL officials dismissed layoff fears as "an ugly rumor." They will affect more than 200 of the laboratory's 2,750 full-time staff and about 140 of 700 contractual employees -- a work force heavily laden with high-tech researchers.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1997
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory has signed long-term contracts with the Navy and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration that represent more than three-fourths of the lab's funding for the next five years.The $1.6 billion Navy contract ensures that APL will continue its role as a major developer of new technology for the nation's fleet of warships. The lab provides research, engineering and technical services on projects such as the Aegis combat system and the Standard missile.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Scientists from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory are set to launch a massive balloon above the skies of New Mexico this weekend for a glimpse of Comet ISON, the rare comet on its way to looping past the sun and Earth in the coming months. The balloon will be carrying a telescope that will observe ISON, as well as another comet that commonly passes through the solar system, in infrared light to see the water and carbon dioxide emanating from it. The mission was pulled together over the past seven months to gather data on ISON before it passes closely by the sun, potentially destroying the comet.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2013
Sometimes it's the simplest ideas that have the biggest impact, and Dan Simon is hoping his will prevent the hearing damage suffered by thousands of military personnel - the top reported service disability in the war on terror. Simon, an engineer at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, and several of his colleagues have modified a generic set of rubbery, orange earplugs to develop an inexpensive "Anti-Blast Earplug. " Simon says the device, which the team has tentatively named the ABLE, allows wearers to hear normally until there's an explosion, such as those created by an improvised explosive device, or IED, the signature weapon of the enemy in Afghanistan and Iraq.
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg | March 21, 2013
When Sheri Lewis joined APL in 2001 as a public health analyst, an electronic disease surveillance system was just being developed at the lab. The impetus, she recalls, was Sept. 11 and the letters containing anthrax bacteria spores that were mailed the week after the attacks to several news media offices and two U.S. senators, killing five people and infecting 17 others.  “The data was there, but we needed to capture it and make it available to public health agencies in a more timely manner,” she says.
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg | March 21, 2013
“The combat system is the brain that helps you fire 'the bullet,' which is actually an extremely complex missile,” Danielle Hilliard says of her highly technical job in air and missile defense. She uses simple visual images to demystify her job as a rocket scientist working on ballistic missiles in APL's Space Department. As a program manager, the 41-year-old Clarksville resident has a dual role that requires her to work internally and externally. She communicates with engineers,  works across APL departments and with partners at such institutions as MIT and Penn State.
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg | March 21, 2013
When Debra Buczkowski was 7, in 1976, NASA's Viking space probes were landing on Mars and sending images of the red planet back to Earth as part of their $1 billion mission. “I realized that no matter where I went on this planet, I couldn't pick up anything in those photos,” the New York native says, recalling how that mesmerized her. Her early appreciation for the wonders of astronomy led to a career mapping structures on other rocky bodies like Earth, such as Mercury and Mars, as opposed to the gas giants, like Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, she says.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater | November 15, 2012
When Elsayed Talaat first began working at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory as a postdoctoral fellow, he was assigned to a project exploring Earth's atmosphere. That was 1999. To this day, he's still dedicated to the TIMED mission, analyzing the findings of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics spacecraft, a 1,300-pound instrument built at APL that has been orbiting Earth since 2001. Talaat's expertise makes him a fitting candidate to share the mission with the public through a new lecture series Beyond Earth presented by APL scientists at Columbia's Robinson Nature Center.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1997
Howard County police escorted a small group of anti-nuclear demonstrators from the main gate of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Fulton yesterday.Police said 16 members of the Baltimore Emergency Response Network (BERN) and a Washington group called the Dorothy Day Catholic Worker assembled at APL's east gate about 7 a.m. to hand out leaflets to laboratory employees as they walked from the parking lot to the main building.The demonstrators, who were objecting to weapons research at the laboratory, were read the county's statute about trespassing and were asked to leave the laboratory's grounds, police said.
EXPLORE
December 13, 2011
The League of American Bicyclists awarded a bronze Bicycle Friendly Business Award to Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, in North Laurel. APL was recognized for promoting employee health and social responsibility through its cycling club and cycling amenities. Some members of the APL cycling club commute daily and travel more than 24 miles each way.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2011
Alvin Ralph Eaton, a pioneer in modern guided missile systems and the longest-serving employee at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, died of cancer Oct. 20. He was 91 and lived in Clarksville. Mr. Eaton's 66-year career coincided with — and he contributed to — historic developments in U.S. missile defense. He corrected flight problems in the first supersonic surface-to-air missiles, developed a widely used tail-control system for supersonic interceptor missiles, and helped shepherd the Patriot anti-missile program in the 1980s.
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