Advertisement
HomeCollectionsApe
IN THE NEWS

Ape

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By THE BALTIMORE ZOO | August 1, 2001
These gibbons are considered even more endangered than other gibbon species, although all are threatened. They are quickly losing their habitat for a number of reasons including logging (cutting down trees) and military actions in the area of Asia where they live. what's for DINNER? Small invertebrates, fruit, and leaves are on the dinner plate. do you KNOW? How long can they live? Answer: White-cheeked gibbons can live up to 30 years. learn MORE! Visit the white-cheeked gibbons, including Jing-chi, a baby born in June, at The Baltimore Zoo. Read "The Bird, The Monkey and The Snake in the Jungle" by Kate Banks.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tionah Lee and For The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
The girls are back! In the spirit of Season 5, with all five girls back together (Hana, Aria, Spencer, Emily and Ali) here are five big moments from last night's season premiere. The big split up : After Season 4's cliffhanger of an ending, we learned that Ezra has indeed survived his gunshot wound from A … but isn't out of the woods yet. While he is rushed to the hospital, Ali notices A on top of the ambulance. It is up to the girls to use Ali as bait to get A alone, so they can find out who “he,” “she” or the “bitch” is. Ali and Aria wander the city, making sure A isn't up to anything outside of the hospital, while Spencer, Hana and Emily end up in the hospital lobby.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | November 18, 2005
Both director and ape were larger than life Before Merian C. Cooper made King Kong, this rugged character from Jacksonville, Fla., became a Hollywood force to be reckoned with by filming real-life adventures in Persia and Siam. After he made King Kong, he became a Tinseltown legend. I'm King Kong, the latest production for Turner Classic Movies by ace documentary director Kevin Brownlow, airing Tuesday, pays stirring tribute to this mammoth risk-taker. The title comes from Cooper himself.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
Medical experiments on chimpanzees are largely unnecessary and should be rare, concluded a report released Thursday from special panel of the Institute of Medicine, part of the National Academies of Science. The authors did not recommend an outright ban, as Europeans countries have done, but suggested strict parameters for research funded by the National Institutes of Health. Leaders there immediately said they would adhere to the recommendations. "The bar is very high," said Jeffrey Kahn, deputy director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, who chaired the panel.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 24, 2005
Hollywood's Christmas gift to us all: the classic King Kong, remade as a chick flick. I think I was in my mid-teens when I saw the original King Kong. It was at a theater near the corner of North Avenue and Charles Street. I can't remember the name. But I can remember who I was with when I saw it. There were about 40 of us, guys from different Baltimore high schools, all part of an Upward Bound program at the Johns Hopkins University. Most of the guys came from what a newspaper told us were "poor families."
NEWS
By Phillip Atiba Goff and Jennifer L. Eberhardt | March 3, 2009
An apology has been issued. The protests are fading. And it may be tempting to dismiss the uproar over the provocative chimpanzee cartoon in The New York Post as just another "race card" dust-up. But that would obscure an underlying reality captured in the Post situation and demonstrated by research we have conducted: Some racial associations are embedded so deeply that they are difficult to recognize, much less eradicate - and they continue to shape our behavior and ideas. The Post cartoon depicted two police officers standing over a chimp they had shot dead in the street.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 10, 1998
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- One day, about 3.5 million years ago, a small ape-man walking through the rain forests fell to his death down a 45-foot-deep cave shaft near here, setting the scene for yesterday's announcement of one of the most dramatic anthropological discoveries ever made.Almost the entire skeleton and skull of the 4-foot-tall hominid -- or member of the family of mankind -- has been found in the cave at Sterkfontein. It may be the oldest complete skeleton of an ancient ape-man unearthed anywhere.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 14, 2005
When it comes to what's great about King Kong, it's not the harum-scarum. It's the girl. That's not to put the title character down. Peter Jackson's King Kong resembles a DC Comics super ape. He boasts the brainpan of Gorilla Grodd and a scrambled version of Superman's power menu: He's faster than a locomotive, more powerful than a speeding bullet, able to leap tall jungle walls in a single bound. As the fearsome monarch of Skull Island, he can dispatch several dinosaurs at once with body-slamming wrestling moves, while holding a human in one hand.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 16, 2005
Her predecessor was promised the tallest, darkest leading man in Hollywood and got him, in the form of a 35-foot gorilla given to beating his chest and roaring lustily. Seventy-two years later, Naomi Watts had to make do with Andy Serkis, a native Londoner of average height and build, albeit with a decidedly jollier disposition. Not that Watts has any complaints about her co-star, whose human-scale performance was translated through 21st-century movie technology into the oversized ape that appears onscreen.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 10, 2004
Director Merian C. Cooper promised her the tallest, darkest leading man in Hollywood. He wasn't kidding. Actress Fay Wray, the famously unrequited love of a 50-foot ape named Kong, died Sunday at her Manhattan apartment. She was 96. "She went as she was going off to sleep, and it was painless and completely comfortable," said film director and friend Rick McKay, who had been with her the night before. "It's really and truly the kind of way you want a leading lady to die in a film." Although she made nearly 100 movies in a career spanning 35 years, Wray today is remembered only for one. But 1933's King Kong, the story of a god-like beast taken from his Skull Island lair and thrust unwillingly into civilized New York, all for the love of a woman, wasn't just any movie, and Wray's performance as the screaming object of the big monkey's affection wasn't just any role.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | August 9, 2011
More than the apes are smart in "Rise of the Planet of the Apes. " This smartly packaged prequel in the long-running simian series rejuvenates what had seemed like a tired franchise. Don't be surprised if these digitally created apes continue to rise in future installments. What makes this latest ape movie work is that it adheres to traits that seem old-fashioned in the current summer movie marketplace. Working with a solidly crafted script by Rick Jaffa and Amanda Silver, director Rupert Wyatt oversees a deliberately paced, detail-oriented story.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Janene Holzberg,Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2009
While the last 700 mountain gorillas in the world live under constant threat in central Africa, their guardians are headquartered continents away in Baltimore. The director of a team of "gorilla doctors" who is based at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore will speak Wednesday in Columbia on working in the wild to rescue the species from the brink of extinction. Dr. Michael Cranfield will give a free presentation on the mission of the Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project to provide treatment for the powerful primates in their natural habitat in Rwanda, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
NEWS
March 16, 2009
Providing for pets after we're gone What a touching story about Kenneth Munzert, who made provisions in his will for his dog ("Bequest for man's best friend," March 11). Some people may think it is frivolous or silly to provide for animals in an estate. I think it is wise that the Maryland legislature is considering a bill allowing owners to establish trust funds for their pets so their wishes are met ("Trust-fund Fidos," editorial, March 3). Pets become like family to many people, and can be the most devoted companions.
NEWS
By Phillip Atiba Goff and Jennifer L. Eberhardt | March 3, 2009
An apology has been issued. The protests are fading. And it may be tempting to dismiss the uproar over the provocative chimpanzee cartoon in The New York Post as just another "race card" dust-up. But that would obscure an underlying reality captured in the Post situation and demonstrated by research we have conducted: Some racial associations are embedded so deeply that they are difficult to recognize, much less eradicate - and they continue to shape our behavior and ideas. The Post cartoon depicted two police officers standing over a chimp they had shot dead in the street.
BUSINESS
By DAVID ZEILER | November 1, 2007
As expected, thousands of eager Mac users rushed out to buy and install the new Leopard version of Mac OS X over the weekend. And for some it did not go well. The most common Leopard install problem, in all its cruel irony, is a Windows-like Blue Screen of Death as the Mac nears the end of the install process. Affected users report a system hang with a blank blue screen. Ugh. The finger of blame has pointed mainly to third-party software from Unsanity, specifically its Application Enhancer (APE)
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | August 9, 2007
NGAMBA ISLAND, Uganda -- The produce starts flying every afternoon at 2:30, just after the 41 chimpanzees emerge from the forest. No one calls them. They know they have a standing reservation at this salad bar bombardment. Passion fruit, carrots, watermelon slices, red tomatoes, unripe oranges, bananas - it all rains down on the assembled apes screaming with hungry excitement or as a show of dominance or to fend off attacks from those of higher rank. The more adept make over-the-shoulder catches.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 31, 2001
When Planet of the Apes opened - and I'm talking about the 1968 original, not Tim Burton's ham-fisted, self-absorbed remake - I remember dashing to the theater, so anxious was I to see this movie that promised a whole planet full of talking primates. And when the movie was over, I remember thinking it was about the coolest thing I'd ever seen. Three decades later, I decided the time was right to reacquaint myself with that sci-fi classic. And what I learned this time is a lesson the favored movies of my youth have taught me time and time again: Some memories are best left alone.
BUSINESS
By DAVID ZEILER | November 1, 2007
As expected, thousands of eager Mac users rushed out to buy and install the new Leopard version of Mac OS X over the weekend. And for some it did not go well. The most common Leopard install problem, in all its cruel irony, is a Windows-like Blue Screen of Death as the Mac nears the end of the install process. Affected users report a system hang with a blank blue screen. Ugh. The finger of blame has pointed mainly to third-party software from Unsanity, specifically its Application Enhancer (APE)
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 24, 2005
Hollywood's Christmas gift to us all: the classic King Kong, remade as a chick flick. I think I was in my mid-teens when I saw the original King Kong. It was at a theater near the corner of North Avenue and Charles Street. I can't remember the name. But I can remember who I was with when I saw it. There were about 40 of us, guys from different Baltimore high schools, all part of an Upward Bound program at the Johns Hopkins University. Most of the guys came from what a newspaper told us were "poor families."
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 16, 2005
Her predecessor was promised the tallest, darkest leading man in Hollywood and got him, in the form of a 35-foot gorilla given to beating his chest and roaring lustily. Seventy-two years later, Naomi Watts had to make do with Andy Serkis, a native Londoner of average height and build, albeit with a decidedly jollier disposition. Not that Watts has any complaints about her co-star, whose human-scale performance was translated through 21st-century movie technology into the oversized ape that appears onscreen.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.