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Apathy

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NEWS
November 10, 2011
What an embarrassment to those who seek elected office in Baltimore - a mere 12 percent of eligible citizens voted on Tuesday. With all the hours, all the door-to-door footwork these politicians (and prospective politicians) put into seeking political office, this is a slap in the face. How many city voters didn't realize there was an election going on until after it passed? To the non-voting whiners who pout the first time they have a disagreement with a local politician, I say, you are the epitome of hypocrisy.
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NEWS
August 11, 2014
The smart meter conspiracy theorists are no doubt buoyed by the news that BGE has been unable to secure appointments to replace the old, analog meters in the homes of some 350,000 customers. But there is no reason to think this reflects some groundswell of opposition to the new technology; on the contrary, it is a clear outlier when it comes to other smart meter installation projects across the nation and even within Maryland. The smart meter conversions for Pepco and Delmarva, for example, are 99 percent complete with opt-out rates of well less than 1 percent.
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NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2011
If the Orioles were Rick Besore's girlfriend, he would have broken off the tortured relationship long ago. Who could still love after the collapse of 2005 or the 2-16 start of 2010 or the dashing of this year's once-robust hopes? But on Monday, Besore stood with his brother Scott on the flag court at Camden Yards, shouting for his 92-loss team to spoil the playoff chances of the Boston Red Sox. Somehow, his bond with a club that will wrap up its 14th straight losing season tonight is stronger than almost any in his life.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 26, 2014
In terms of public interest in elections, the voting for members of Congress in off-years, when no presidential candidates are on the ballot, is historically low. The stakes generally seem not very great, and familiarity breeds success for incumbents, who are re-elected at a rate of about 90 percent. The same is likely to be true this November, even as the major political parties and independent special interest groups are focusing frantically on the outcome. They're pouring uncommon amounts of time, money and advertising into the primary elections that are choosing their nominees for the fall voting.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | April 23, 1993
If this year's Columbia elections hold true to form, apathy will be the most obvious common denominator.Even before a vote is cast, the signals are clear.Only one-third of the village board and Columbia Council races ++ are contested. And the voter quotas set by some villages show remarkably low expectations. In the Village of Long Reach, for example, just 50 voting households out of 4,700 are needed to validate tomorrow's election.Several candidates running for elected positions have commented on the lack of participation and suggest increasing community involvement as a top priority in their campaigns.
NEWS
July 19, 1992
Will Mitchell figures government is never going to step in to help the people of the Jonathan Street community of downtown Hagerstown. So last year he moved there from Baltimore to help the community help itself, as program director of a 21-month-old organization called Community Solidarity.To visit the Jonathan Street area is to see what happens when frustration with government gives way to long years of deadening apathy. Most of its residents are low-income blacks, and after years of being sealed off from the rest of Hagerstown in one way or another, they generally tune out politics and elections.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 23, 2005
MY FAVORITE newspaper says there's political apathy on the campus of the Johns Hopkins University, but I don't know. Somebody with a conscience filled up all those seats in the big Shriver Hall Auditorium the other night after Cindy Sheehan gave up her vigil outside George W. Bush's ranch in Crawford, Texas. And a few hundred of the allegedly apathetic stood up and promised to join her at tomorrow's march in Washington. The march is aimed at stopping the war in Iraq. The reaction at Hopkins is said to be: Wake me for my 8 o'clock on Monday.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | September 12, 1990
There are several theories as to why Maryland voters stayed away from the polls in droves yesterday. Today, class, we will examine this subject at length.Theory No. 1: Apathy.This excuse has been used ever since the sixth grade, when Cindy Goldman tried to get everyone in Miss Smith's class to take part in a Dinosaur Day. It didn't work. Cindy showed up in a Wilma Flintstone costume and her friend, Francis Moyette, brought a couple of rubber replicas of Mesozoic reptiles. Maybe -- just maybe -- Michael Cruz brought in a rubber Tyrannosaurus.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | January 15, 1992
Attempting to explain reaction on the crab flats of the Chesapeake Bay to the mighty success of the Washington Redskins is erroneously perceived as being one of rampant disappointment. This is a situation fueled by envy, cheap insults and distortion. It's the wrong read. To be correct, it's more like apathy toward the Redskins than antagonism.What is a source of aggravation to Baltimore football followers is the fact its newspapers have devoted columns of valuable space, ad infinitum, to a team that few among its readership care about.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 2003
ANN ARBOR, Mich. - Slapped on a signpost, no bigger than a name tag, a neatly printed sticker hovers above the Diag, the University of Michigan's main square. "Dear Mr. President," it says, "this is what democracy looks like." Black and Latino students have wrapped gags over their mouths to signify how small their presence would be without affirmative action, and have mentioned the swastikas they sometimes find scribbled on their doors. Conservative groups selling morning bagels and muffins have charged white students extra, to drive home the effect of racial preferences and have complained about having their rally posters yanked away and torn.
NEWS
April 18, 2012
Where is the man who can stand erect amongst his kind, and boast that he has passed unscathed through the ordeal which has been prepared for our enterprising and commercial countrymen? Such men are few and far between; and could we scrutinize them in their privacy, how soon we should perceive the absurdity of the thought, that they have been unaffected by it. We should see them at one time elated with hope and confidence, and the blood coursing high and tumultuously along the channels of the system, under the natural influence of that state of the mind -- anon.
NEWS
November 10, 2011
What an embarrassment to those who seek elected office in Baltimore - a mere 12 percent of eligible citizens voted on Tuesday. With all the hours, all the door-to-door footwork these politicians (and prospective politicians) put into seeking political office, this is a slap in the face. How many city voters didn't realize there was an election going on until after it passed? To the non-voting whiners who pout the first time they have a disagreement with a local politician, I say, you are the epitome of hypocrisy.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2011
If the Orioles were Rick Besore's girlfriend, he would have broken off the tortured relationship long ago. Who could still love after the collapse of 2005 or the 2-16 start of 2010 or the dashing of this year's once-robust hopes? But on Monday, Besore stood with his brother Scott on the flag court at Camden Yards, shouting for his 92-loss team to spoil the playoff chances of the Boston Red Sox. Somehow, his bond with a club that will wrap up its 14th straight losing season tonight is stronger than almost any in his life.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
A fraction of the city's electorate trickled into polls for Tuesday's primary — the lowest recorded turnout in Baltimore's history. About 75,000 Baltimore residents voted in the election, with 100 percent of precincts reporting, according to elections officials. That total amounts to about 23 percent of registered voters and about 12 percent of the city's 620,000 population. Cheswolde resident Barbara Hoffman, a former state senator, lamented the low turnout. "How mortifying," she said.
NEWS
September 30, 2010
As a volunteer in the Gregg Bernstein campaign, it saddens me racial demographics are being so minutely analyzed ("Bernstein crossed racial lines to win," Sept. 30). I happen to be white, but that's not why I volunteered for Mr. Bernstein. His skin color was no concern to me, it was his position on crime in Baltimore. I spent most of the day handing out his literature near my polling place in a predominantly white neighborhood (Little Italy), and I was appalled by the low turnout.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun television critic | July 6, 2008
America may be very much at war, but in the nation's pop culture trenches, telling stories about Iraq is a losing battle. That truth has become increasingly clear as the same American majority that supported the start of the war in 2003 has come to consistently tune out feature films, TV series, books and nightly news accounts about the conflict today. In July 2005, cable channel FX introduced producer Steven Bochco's Over There, the first TV drama to air concurrently with a war in which it was set. Despite much advance praise, the series about a platoon of Army soldiers fighting in Iraq bombed in the ratings.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Staff Writer | April 4, 1992
This is the third in a series of conversations with voting Americans. Throughout the presidential campaign, The Sun is talking with voters in different regions of the country, sounding .. out the electorate as the two major parties select nominees.ROCHESTER, N.Y. -- Go ask the construction worker about the presidential elections. Then ask the corporate accountant, the retired couple, the entrepreneur, and the real estate executive. They've never met, but they sound as if they just came from the same talk show, their comments overlapping in a loop of apathy and anxiety.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | September 21, 2005
The flier, one among a clutter of paper advertising everything from med-school prep classes to Greek Week 2005, goes largely unnoticed by the backpack-toting students who breeze by a notice board on the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus. "National March on Washington," it reads. "End the War on Iraq!" By yesterday afternoon, the Hopkins Anti-War Coalition had signed up about 45 people for Saturday's demonstration, including graduate students and professors, the driving force behind the coalition.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,sun reporter | July 25, 2007
Concerned about the continual reports of violent deaths in Baltimore - and residents' apparent apathy - the city branch of the NAACP is calling for the current number of homicides to be posted in windows of homes and businesses. "The whole idea is to get the community outraged about these homicides. We're getting immune to getting upset about it," Marvin "Doc" Cheatham Sr., president of the city's branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said last night.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,SUN REPORTER | May 22, 2007
Vowing to decrease by half the number of murders in Baltimore this summer, the Rev. Jamal-Harrison Bryant, whose youth and charisma have propelled him to celebrity status in the area's Christian community, announced yesterday plans for a new crime-fighting initiative called "Stop Sinning" - a play on the infamous inner-city mantra "Stop Snitching." Standing under a white tent before a podium on a West Baltimore street, Bryant, who heads Empowerment Temple AME Church - which began as a congregation of 40 and grew into a megachurch of more than 10,000 under his leadership - called for the city's more than 2,000 places of worship to help decrease the violence and "apathy," that he said has overtaken the city.
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