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NEWS
By Pat O'Malley | May 8, 1991
Time for another session of "Q's & A's," sports fans. It's the column that raises questions without answers, compliments of you and your input to the 24-hour Sportsline, 647-2499.All remarks, positive or negative, and any "Q's" of your own are always, always welcome on the Sportsline.* Did you aspiring football players who live in the north part ofthe county know there are going to be more opportunities for you andyour friends to play in a well-coached and well-run organization?A new football organization has been formed, and it will be called the Brooklyn Park Broncos Youth Football Program.
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
Defense contractors Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman said Thursday that they've won a $91 million contract for radars to be used on Saudi Arabia's Apache attack helicopters. Northrop Grumman said its share of the Longbow work would be handled from its electronic systems division in Linthicum. Lockheed Martin is based in Bethesda. The companies said the contract is for Longbow Fire Control Radars for the Royal Saudi Land Forces Aviation Command and the Saudi Arabia National Guard, spares and support for the aviation command and Longbow mast mounted assemblies for the U.S. Army.
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NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 2001
THE SENIOR Competition Squad of the Andover Apache Cheerleading Team has a lot to cheer about. Its members - children in grades five to eight - returned from the recent Cheer Power National Championship in Galveston, Texas, as Junior Recreational National Champions. They brought home the National First Place Award trophy and a second trophy for the team that traveled farthest to take part in the event. In addition, the team was awarded a plaque for the "Nation's Best Choreography," for a routine that was scored against all teams in attendance - both recreational and high school levels.
NEWS
March 8, 2009
Pelham Harrison Schmidt, Arrangements were handled by Apache Junction Mortuary.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 17, 2003
CAMP UDAIRI, Kuwait - The Apache helicopter gunships have arrived, with their angular cockpits, snub noses and enough firepower to decimate tanks five miles away. The Army's 101st Airborne Division has shipped 72 Apaches here to supply the unit's main punch in an Iraq war. Their missions could range from targeting Iraqi tanks to protecting American infantry. Within this group are 48 advanced Longbow models that the 101st has never used in combat. Battles against Iraq would be the first real-world test for its bubble-shaped radar system, which is designed to find tanks and other targets automatically.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | January 9, 1991
Reeling from the cancellation of the A-12 and other defense cuts Monday, Westinghouse and Martin Marietta Corp. rebounded powerfully yesterday with an Army contract that could add more than $2.5 billion in new business to their books.The contract is for the full-scale development of the Longbow targeting and missile system that is to be used on the Army's Apache attack helicopters.Bethesda-based Martin and the Westinghouse Electronic Systems Group in Linthicum have combined their resources on the development of the Longbow system, which is designed to detect enemy targets more quickly than current systems in use, identify them and automatically advise the crew on the appropriate missile to fire to destroy the target.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2001
Its intimidating black shape and missile-spiked fuselage send enemy soldiers scratching for cover. Its name is considered so cool that children tattoo it on their arms in felt-tip marker. Its reputation reportedly swayed Britain's Prince William into considering a military career. Few weapons of modern warfare inspire as much myth or radiate as much menace as the U.S. Army's Apache AH-64 attack helicopter. Designed to tangle with tanks and melt mountaintops, the Apache - on paper at least - is the most lethal helicopter in the world, capable of carrying 16 Hellfire anti-tank missiles, 76 Hydra anti-personnel rockets, and 1,200 rounds of armor-piercing ammunition.
NEWS
March 8, 2009
Pelham Harrison Schmidt, Arrangements were handled by Apache Junction Mortuary.
NEWS
November 11, 1990
An Army helicopter pictured in the Sunday paper was misidentified as a CH-46 Blackhawk. It was an AH-64 Apache. The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
August 28, 1994
Allan Houser, 80, Apache sculptor and grandson of Apache chief Mangas Coloradas, died of cancer Monday in Santa Fe, N.M. His work in stone, wood and bronze -- portraying mother and child, warriors on horseback, Apache fire dancers and other themes in a variety of styles from dramatic realism to abstract geometric shapes -- has been displayed in museums in this country and abroad. Former President George Bush presented him with the National Medal of Arts in 1992.James McCurdy, 72, a noted naval architect and sailboat racer, died Aug. 21 in New York.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 26, 2003
The Missing, Ron Howard's latest grim suspense film (it's like a period-piece twin of his earlier Ransom), gives "adult Westerns" a bad name. It follows a frontier healer (Cate Blanchett) in 1885 New Mexico as she goes searching for her kidnapped teen-age daughter (Evan Rachel Wood) with the help of her younger daughter (Jena Boyd) and her estranged father (Tommy Lee Jones). Partly a dysfunctional-family tale set in the Old West, the movie paints a bleak and unimaginative portrait of pioneer America as a chaotic, unforgiving wilderness filled with venal or cowardly white folk and warring factions of Native Americans.
NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 26, 2003
FORT APACHE, Ariz. - A stroll along Officers Row of this decaying Army post conjures up images of John Wayne, horse soldiers and Indian bands led by Geronimo. Made famous by dime novels and Western movies, Fort Apache is synonymous with the Old West. From 1870 until it was decommissioned in 1922, the fort was a powerful symbol of the federal government's military might in Indian country. The fort offered salvation to white settlers fearful of Indian attacks, but to the native people it was the home of an occupying army bent on subjugating them.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 27, 2003
WASHINGTON - The single biggest killer of American and British troops so far in the war with Iraq is a notoriously dangerous and fickle piece of machinery that coalition forces wouldn't dare go into battle without. Helicopters - their own helicopters - have killed 19 American and British servicemen in crashes in and near Iraq over the past week. Two more Americans were captured when they had to ditch an Army helicopter 50 miles south of Baghdad. Another six died last week in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 25, 2003
WASHINGTON - American forces closed in on Baghdad yesterday, hitting elite Iraqi troops outside the capital with helicopter gunships and bombs, while small groups of soldiers loyal to Saddam Hussein's government kept up their deadly assaults on the advancing forces. Lead elements of the main U.S. ground invasion force assembled within 50 miles of Baghdad. But it was unclear how soon the battle for the capital would begin, particularly if stiff Iraqi resistance behind the front lines or sandstorms continue.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 17, 2003
CAMP UDAIRI, Kuwait - The Apache helicopter gunships have arrived, with their angular cockpits, snub noses and enough firepower to decimate tanks five miles away. The Army's 101st Airborne Division has shipped 72 Apaches here to supply the unit's main punch in an Iraq war. Their missions could range from targeting Iraqi tanks to protecting American infantry. Within this group are 48 advanced Longbow models that the 101st has never used in combat. Battles against Iraq would be the first real-world test for its bubble-shaped radar system, which is designed to find tanks and other targets automatically.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and By James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | July 14, 2002
Summertime and the readin' is easy Among history's freedom fighters, Lucia St. Clair Robson of Annapolis bids us not to forget the Apaches. In her new novel, Ghost Warrior (Forge, 749 pages, $27.95), she arms us and mounts us for one more raid on the Pale Eyes moving into the ancestral southwestern homeland, in the later 1800s. We know very well who's going to win in the end; but watching the evil deeds of Mexicans on the lower side of an invisible boundary and the imbecilities of U.S. military commanders on the upper side, we flinch.
BUSINESS
By Laura Pavlenko Lutton and Laura Pavlenko Lutton,MORNINGSTAR.COM | October 29, 2000
With Election Day swiftly approaching, presidential politics have been the subject of water-cooler banter everywhere. One popular debate has been whether one candidate would be more helpful to businesses - and their shareholders - if he were to become president. Wall Street seems to be viewing Gov. George W. Bush, the Texas Republican, as the pro-business candidate. In fact, it may be easier to list the industries that would be threatened rather than helped should Vice President Al Gore be elected.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | May 9, 1993
Remember the good ol' days, when the only sort of words pop fans had to worry about were the ones rumored to be in "Louie Louie"?That, of course, was long before 2 Live Crew's "Nasty as They Wanna Be" and Madonna's "Sex." Years, even, before Tipper Gore made up her first "Parental Advisory" sticker. Back then, even stuff like "Why Don't We Do It in the Road" was considered shocking.Not anymore. These days, pop fans are more likely to be appalled by performers who won't curse than those who do. Just look at how quickly being a nice girl torpedoed Debbie Gibson's career.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2001
Its intimidating black shape and missile-spiked fuselage send enemy soldiers scratching for cover. Its name is considered so cool that children tattoo it on their arms in felt-tip marker. Its reputation reportedly swayed Britain's Prince William into considering a military career. Few weapons of modern warfare inspire as much myth or radiate as much menace as the U.S. Army's Apache AH-64 attack helicopter. Designed to tangle with tanks and melt mountaintops, the Apache - on paper at least - is the most lethal helicopter in the world, capable of carrying 16 Hellfire anti-tank missiles, 76 Hydra anti-personnel rockets, and 1,200 rounds of armor-piercing ammunition.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 2001
THE SENIOR Competition Squad of the Andover Apache Cheerleading Team has a lot to cheer about. Its members - children in grades five to eight - returned from the recent Cheer Power National Championship in Galveston, Texas, as Junior Recreational National Champions. They brought home the National First Place Award trophy and a second trophy for the team that traveled farthest to take part in the event. In addition, the team was awarded a plaque for the "Nation's Best Choreography," for a routine that was scored against all teams in attendance - both recreational and high school levels.
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