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By Richard Saltus and Richard Saltus,Boston Globe | June 11, 1993
BOSTON -- In a complex and daring operation, surgeons at the Lahey Clinic in Burlington, Mass., have for the first time replaced a patient's entire aorta -- the largest and most crucial blood vessel in the body -- in a single procedure.Until now, surgeons had considered it too risky to replace the delicate aorta all at once. As a result, patients with diseased aortas had to undergo two or more separate surgeries weeks or months apart as surgeons replaced the diseased vessel in sections.The 67-year-old patient, who requested anonymity, underwent the operation four weeks ago to replace a dangerously enlarged aorta, and was reported yesterday to be doing well.
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By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Reporter | June 26, 2008
A popular blood-pressure medication has shown promise as a therapy for Marfan syndrome, slowing and, in some cases, stopping the enlargement of a major blood vessel that can lead to fatal ruptures, Johns Hopkins researchers reported today. Although they cautioned that their study was small and the results preliminary, the scientists at Hopkins' School of Medicine say the drug could reduce the need for the open-heart operations that many patients need to stay alive. "The results are telling me that there is the potential to prevent aortic disease for a lifetime," said Dr. Harry Dietz, the Hopkins geneticist and cardiologist who led the study appearing in today's New England Journal of Medicine.
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FEATURES
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Reporter | June 26, 2008
A popular blood-pressure medication has shown promise as a therapy for Marfan syndrome, slowing and, in some cases, stopping the enlargement of a major blood vessel that can lead to fatal ruptures, Johns Hopkins researchers reported today. Although they cautioned that their study was small and the results preliminary, the scientists at Hopkins' School of Medicine say the drug could reduce the need for the open-heart operations that many patients need to stay alive. "The results are telling me that there is the potential to prevent aortic disease for a lifetime," said Dr. Harry Dietz, the Hopkins geneticist and cardiologist who led the study appearing in today's New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | April 7, 2006
A half-century after a Johns Hopkins physician first described symptoms of Marfan syndrome, researchers there are planning a clinical trial of a drug that prevented a fatal complication in mice. The condition, which strikes more than 30,000 Americans, weakens the body's connective tissues, making victims unusually tall and lanky but also prone to fatal ruptures of the aorta, the artery that carries blood exiting the heart. Today's edition of the journal Science carries hopeful news that a common hypertension drug prevented aortic weakening in mice and restored the aortas to their normal size.
NEWS
October 21, 1991
Grant Turner, a Grand Ole Opry announcer for a half-century, died Saturday of a heart aneurysm. He was 79. As he had for 47 years, Mr. Turner worked the Friday night Opry show. He died six hours later at Saint Thomas Hospital. "He worked every Friday and Saturday night, every weekend, doing what he loved best," said his daughter, Nancy Turner, who said her father had an enlarged aorta and knew he was at risk. Mr. Turner also provided daily commentary on Nashville radio station WSM, where he worked for 47 years, his family said.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | April 7, 2006
A half-century after a Johns Hopkins physician first described symptoms of Marfan syndrome, researchers there are planning a clinical trial of a drug that prevented a fatal complication in mice. The condition, which strikes more than 30,000 Americans, weakens the body's connective tissues, making victims unusually tall and lanky but also prone to fatal ruptures of the aorta, the artery that carries blood exiting the heart. Today's edition of the journal Science carries hopeful news that a common hypertension drug prevented aortic weakening in mice and restored the aortas to their normal size.
NEWS
August 1, 2004
Michelle Juliet Dunbar, a 2001 Pikesville High School graduate who wanted to write and teach, died Wednesday of a ruptured aorta at Ellis Hospital in Schenectady, N.Y. She was 21. Born in Schenectady to an Air Force family, she grew up across the country and around the world, including in England, Japan and Oklahoma. Before moving to Pikesville in 2000, Miss. Dunbar attended Bellevue High School in Bellevue, Neb., for three years. After graduating from high school, she attended Schenectady County Community College, where she took English and psychology classes, said Kay Marie Webster, her mother.
NEWS
May 23, 1998
John Derek,71, the actor-director reputed to have been the force behind the meteoric career of his wife, Bo Derek, died yesterday in Santa Maria, Calif. Dr. Luke Faber said Mr. Derek had suffered a catastrophic problem with his aorta and heart.Mr. Derek began as a movie actor in the 1940s. Despite roles in "All the King's Men," "The Ten Commandments" and "Exodus," his acting career stalled and he turned to still photography, film directing and producing.Herbert Aaron,89, the father of former baseball star Henry Aaron, died Thursday in Mobile, Ala.John Berry Sr.,75, a philanthropist who built his family's Yellow Pages company into a billion-dollar business, died Wednesday in Dayton, Ohio.
NEWS
By Tanya Jameson and Tanya Jameson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 13, 1997
For most 5-year-olds, dumping puzzle pieces on the family room floor and talking about favorite movies are normal behavior. For Courtney Wicker, they're close to a miracle.Now in kindergarten at Dasher Green Elementary School, Courtney was born with a heart defect so serious that it made sucking a bottle the equivalent of doing aerobics 24 hours a day."Surgery wasn't an option," says Courtney's mother, Cheron Wicker, 38. "It was mandatory."These days, Courtney's story is the focus of Maryland's American Heart Association's annual report, which is filled with pictures of her sparkling face and bright smile.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | November 1, 1990
The discovery of a defective gene that causes a common vascular aneurysm -- a balloonlike swelling in the aorta, the largest artery of the body -- was reported today by researchers at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia."
NEWS
August 1, 2004
Michelle Juliet Dunbar, a 2001 Pikesville High School graduate who wanted to write and teach, died Wednesday of a ruptured aorta at Ellis Hospital in Schenectady, N.Y. She was 21. Born in Schenectady to an Air Force family, she grew up across the country and around the world, including in England, Japan and Oklahoma. Before moving to Pikesville in 2000, Miss. Dunbar attended Bellevue High School in Bellevue, Neb., for three years. After graduating from high school, she attended Schenectady County Community College, where she took English and psychology classes, said Kay Marie Webster, her mother.
NEWS
May 23, 1998
John Derek,71, the actor-director reputed to have been the force behind the meteoric career of his wife, Bo Derek, died yesterday in Santa Maria, Calif. Dr. Luke Faber said Mr. Derek had suffered a catastrophic problem with his aorta and heart.Mr. Derek began as a movie actor in the 1940s. Despite roles in "All the King's Men," "The Ten Commandments" and "Exodus," his acting career stalled and he turned to still photography, film directing and producing.Herbert Aaron,89, the father of former baseball star Henry Aaron, died Thursday in Mobile, Ala.John Berry Sr.,75, a philanthropist who built his family's Yellow Pages company into a billion-dollar business, died Wednesday in Dayton, Ohio.
NEWS
By Tanya Jameson and Tanya Jameson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 13, 1997
For most 5-year-olds, dumping puzzle pieces on the family room floor and talking about favorite movies are normal behavior. For Courtney Wicker, they're close to a miracle.Now in kindergarten at Dasher Green Elementary School, Courtney was born with a heart defect so serious that it made sucking a bottle the equivalent of doing aerobics 24 hours a day."Surgery wasn't an option," says Courtney's mother, Cheron Wicker, 38. "It was mandatory."These days, Courtney's story is the focus of Maryland's American Heart Association's annual report, which is filled with pictures of her sparkling face and bright smile.
NEWS
By Richard Saltus and Richard Saltus,Boston Globe | June 11, 1993
BOSTON -- In a complex and daring operation, surgeons at the Lahey Clinic in Burlington, Mass., have for the first time replaced a patient's entire aorta -- the largest and most crucial blood vessel in the body -- in a single procedure.Until now, surgeons had considered it too risky to replace the delicate aorta all at once. As a result, patients with diseased aortas had to undergo two or more separate surgeries weeks or months apart as surgeons replaced the diseased vessel in sections.The 67-year-old patient, who requested anonymity, underwent the operation four weeks ago to replace a dangerously enlarged aorta, and was reported yesterday to be doing well.
NEWS
October 21, 1991
Grant Turner, a Grand Ole Opry announcer for a half-century, died Saturday of a heart aneurysm. He was 79. As he had for 47 years, Mr. Turner worked the Friday night Opry show. He died six hours later at Saint Thomas Hospital. "He worked every Friday and Saturday night, every weekend, doing what he loved best," said his daughter, Nancy Turner, who said her father had an enlarged aorta and knew he was at risk. Mr. Turner also provided daily commentary on Nashville radio station WSM, where he worked for 47 years, his family said.
NEWS
September 12, 1993
Margaret E. KestlerTalbot Co. homemakerMargaret E. Kestler, 79, a Talbot County homemaker and member of the United Methodist Women of the Church, died Sept. 2 at the University of Maryland Medical Center as a result of a dissected aorta.She lived in Catonsville for 23 years before moving to Neavitt, near St. Michaels, 17 years ago.The Baltimore native was the daughter of the late Benjamin F. and Effie Goodman Bradley.She was a member of the Neavitt United Methodist Church.Services were conducted Sept.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 1996
During a checkup, my doctor said that my examination and tests were normal except for left ventricular hypertrophy on the electrocardiogram. What causes left ventricular hypertrophy. Is it dangerous? Can it be treated?Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an enlargement of the left ventricle, the heart chamber that pumps blood through the aorta to all of the body except the lungs. The enlargement may involve either thickening of the wall of the left ventricle or an increase in the size of the chamber itself.
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