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Gus G. Sentementes | March 5, 2012
The fallout of Rush Limbaugh calling a law student a "slut" and a "prostitute" for advocating insurance coverage for birth control continues: AOL pulled its advertising money from his radio show, according to a Facebook update by the technology company . (AOL has a major division, Advertising.com, in Baltimore.) Per AOL, two hours ago on its FB page, which has 279,000+ followers: At AOL one of our core values is that we act with integrity. We have monitored the unfolding events and have determined that Mr. Limbaugh's comments are not in line with our values.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
The editors of many local Patch websites were among a large number of employees reportedly laid off by the news company Wednesday, under a national "restructuring" by its new owner. Investment holding company Hale Global agreed to assume majority ownership of Patch from AOL earlier this month. The exact toll among Maryland's sites remained unclear, but several local editors confirmed — some on the condition of anonymity — that they had been let go. Some employees still were waiting Wednesday to see what the conditions of their severance would be, and if it would include a non-disclosure clause.
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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | September 19, 2006
NEW YORK -- AOL, Time Warner Inc.'s Internet unit, and Intel Corp. started an online video-on-demand service yesterday that lets users watch films, concerts and sports programs on their television sets. The service allows users to search for videos available on AOL with a TV remote control, said Kevin Conroy, executive vice president at AOL. Personal computers based on Intel's Viiv semiconductors and software will make it easier to search, record and watch music and video files. "The partnership with Intel enabled us to bring this experience to the living room," Conroy said in an interview, referring to watching videos online.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | March 5, 2012
The fallout of Rush Limbaugh calling a law student a "slut" and a "prostitute" for advocating insurance coverage for birth control continues: AOL pulled its advertising money from his radio show, according to a Facebook update by the technology company . (AOL has a major division, Advertising.com, in Baltimore.) Per AOL, two hours ago on its FB page, which has 279,000+ followers: At AOL one of our core values is that we act with integrity. We have monitored the unfolding events and have determined that Mr. Limbaugh's comments are not in line with our values.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank Barnako and Frank Barnako,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 15, 2004
WASHINGTON - America Online plans to offer some of its music, sports and news on the Internet at no charge. The Time Warner unit is presenting free content, such as a concert by Usher that was available March 23, to encourage sampling. "This will give people on the Web a glimpse of what they would have had access to if they were members," said Jim Bankoff, executive vice president for programming. Putting content on the Web also gives the company greater opportunity for advertising revenue.
FEATURES
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 25, 2002
NEW YORK - The Rev. Al Sharpton has filed a $1 billion defamation lawsuit against AOL Time Warner Inc. over a Home Box Office cable show that aired FBI surveillance tapes of Sharpton discussing a drug deal. Sharpton said in the lawsuit filed in New York State Supreme Court in Lower Manhattan that Tuesday night's Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel program about corruption in sports failed to show portions of the 1983 tapes in which Sharpton allegedly rejects the drug deal. "I will not bend or buckle or bow to a smear campaign," Sharpton, who is considering a campaign for U.S. president in 2004, said during a news conference at the courthouse yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | August 9, 1999
My family and I need Internet access and an e-mail address at home. I've been swamped by offers from companies and don't know which to choose. Which do you recommend?For absolute newcomers the answer is clear, at least in this writer's opinion: America Online. AOL comes close to being the no-brainer solution to getting the modern PC or Mac up and running with full-blown Internet features.When America Online software is working well, as it usually does, installing the needed programs and Internet connections is as simple as sticking the CD-ROM into your drive and following the directions that automatically appear on your monitor.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 2, 1998
A fledgling business group is threatening to make public the electronic addresses of 5 million America Online customers if the world's largest online service refuses to accept unsolicited commercial e-mail from its members.Joe Melle, president of the National Organization of Internet Commerce in Chino, Calif., said the companies in his 3-month-old group want to use electronic mail to pitch products cheaply to AOL's 10 million members.NOIC wants to send the unsolicited e-mail -- called "spam" -- but AOL has refused to enter into negotiations with the group.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Weinberg and By Steve Weinberg,Special to the Sun | June 15, 2003
Stealing Time: Steve Case, Jerry Levin, and the Collapse of AOL Time Warner, by Alec Klein. Simon & Schuster, 352 pages, $26. It seems like eons ago that America Online merged with Time Warner. But it has actually been just three years. The reason it seems like eons is that corporate analysts and journalists have talked and written incessantly about the biggest merger ever, about how the synergy of online services, magazines, movies, cable television news and entertainment shows, etc., etc., blah, blah would rule the world.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | August 21, 2007
SAN FRANCISCO -- Just over a year ago, AOL unveiled a radical plan to remake itself into a business built on advertising from one driven by Internet access subscriptions. To a great extent, AOL had little choice in the matter. Customers were rapidly deserting its once-lucrative dial-up access service, and retaining them was costly. The new plan certainly seemed to make sense. With an advertising business built around Baltimore-based Advertising.com growing rapidly across the Web, AOL appeared to be in an ideal place to capitalize on that trend.
NEWS
By Tim Rutten | February 13, 2011
Whatever the ultimate impact of AOL's $315 million acquisition of the Huffington Post on the new-media landscape, it's already clear that the merger will push more journalists more deeply into the tragically expanding low-wage sector of our increasingly brutal economy. That's a development that will hurt not only the people who gather and edit the news but also readers and viewers. To understand why, it's helpful to step back from the wide-eyed coverage focused on foundering AOL's last-ditch effort to stave off the oblivion of irrelevance, or Arianna Huffington's astonishing commercial achievement in taking her Web news portal from startup to commercial success in less than six years.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2010
Advertising.com, an online advertising firm, is looking to hire again at its Baltimore headquarters after launching a major new product and as it recovers from a downsizing last winter instituted by its corporate parent, AOL Inc. The company expects to hire as many as 35 people this year, mainly in technology, global business operations, and advertising products and operations, executives said. The company, based in the Tide Point office complex in Locust Point, now has about 200 employees in Baltimore.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2010
The nation's most desirable neighborhood for seniors - an oasis of calm and sophistication that outscores the popular communities of the Sun Belt - lies just over the Baltimore City line. America Online has chosen Chestnut Hill in West Towson from among 61,000 neighborhoods as the No. 1 "dream retirement area" in the country. The community topped a list released this week that also included Sedona, Ariz.; Naples, Fla.; and Santa Barbara, Calif. "It really is the perfect place and now the whole country knows," Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. said Thursday at Blakehurst, one of two senior-living complexes in the neighborhood.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | January 14, 2010
Fewer than 50 workers are expected to be laid off this week from Advertising.com, a major Baltimore-based subsidiary of AOL Inc., as part of a change in strategy for the Internet giant, according to company officials. AOL spun off from Time Warner Inc. last month and is trying to transform itself primarily into a producer of online advertising and editorial content. AOL bought Time Warner, based in New York City, in 2001 in an acquisition that is now widely regarded as one of the worst business deals in history.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | January 14, 2010
Fewer than 50 workers are expected to be laid off this week from Advertising.com, a major Baltimore-based subsidiary of AOL Inc., as part of a change in strategy for the Internet giant, according to company officials. AOL spun off from Time Warner Inc. last month and is trying to transform itself primarily into a producer of online advertising and editorial content. AOL bought Time Warner, based in New York City, in 2001 in an acquisition that is now widely regarded as one of the worst business deals in history.
NEWS
November 21, 2009
Workers at Advertising.com in Baltimore will be eligible to participate in a voluntary buyout program that its parent company, AOL LLC, is planning next month as part of a larger effort to cut one-third of its work force, or 2,500 positions. Advertising.com, which is AOL's online advertising network, employs about 400 people at the Tide Point office complex in South Baltimore. Time Warner Inc. is spinning off AOL, a one-time Internet giant, on Dec. 9, and the company will be accepting volunteers to leave between Dec. 4 and 11. AOL, which is based in New York City, has said that if it does not get enough volunteers, it will resort to involuntary layoffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | November 30, 1998
Think about what happens when you log onto the Internet. Chances are good that you sit down at your computer, click on an icon that dials the phone and sit back, waiting for something to happen.The nature of that "something" is important to a lot of people because you're a valuable commodity. You're a set of eyeballs attached to a wallet - a potential customer for advertisers and online merchants. To get to the wallet, they have to capture the eyeball - and it looks as if America Online may capture yours, whether you know it or not.In fact, eyeballs were one of the driving forces behind AOL's decision to acquire Netscape Communications in a $4 billion stock swap.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 8, 2006
DULLES, Va. -- AOL LLC, Time Warner Inc.'s Internet unit, said yesterday that it inadvertently released three months of Internet search information from about 658,000 customers. The data included 20 million keyword terms entered by users of AOL's software when they search the Web. The files were posted about 10 days ago at an Internet site for research by employees and academics and were removed Sunday night, Andrew Weinstein, an AOL spokesman, said. "This was a screw-up, and we're angry and upset about it," Weinstein said.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2009
Time Warner to spin off AOL, ending ill-fated deal WASHINGTON -: Media giant Time Warner announced Thursday what it had said it intended to do more than a year ago: Unload its struggling AOL advertising-and-dial-up unit, which will face life as a standalone, publicly traded company. The move officially ends the nine-year saga of Dulles, Va.-based AOL and New York's Time Warner, which began when AOL co-founder Steve Case engineered what was hailed at the time as the first of what would be several mega-marriages between old and new media.
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