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By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1997
OSHKOSH, Wis. -- Life in Oshkosh has its certainties. An ice fishing contest on Lake Winnebago in winter. The annual convention of 900,000 recreational pilots in summer. Strangers asking: "You're from Oshkosh? Isn't that where OshKosh B'Gosh bib overalls are made?""We used to be able to say 'yes,' " said Richard Wollangk, city manager. "Now we won't be able to say that anymore."Beginning in April, for the first time in 102 years, Oshkosh won't make OshKosh B'Gosh. Last week, the company announced plans to close the hometown manufacturing plant, lay off 75 workers and ship production of men's bib overalls out of the country.
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NEWS
By Julia Kim Leff | May 12, 2014
Last month, when Gov. Martin O'Malley passed historic legislation to decriminalize the possession of small amounts of marijuana, Maryland was abuzz. Politicians, the media, advocates and critics voiced their opinions (both supporting and opposing the bill) loud and clear. But there was a critical voice missing from this conversation: the voice of a teenager. It's widely understood that decriminalization is the first step toward legalization, and teens understand all too well how this will play out in conversations at the dinner table and in drug education classrooms at school.
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SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2005
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Orioles pitcher Kurt Ainsworth will have his sore right shoulder examined in Baltimore tomorrow, and it's possible another dose of bad news could push him into retirement. Ainsworth, 26, conceded the possibility yesterday while standing at his locker before the Orioles' 5-3 split-squad victory over the St. Louis Cardinals. He might be dealing with something as simple as mild inflammation that will subside with rest. Or he might have thrown a baseball for the last time.
NEWS
September 19, 2013
If there was any doubt about how cowed America is by the gun lobby, it was erased today by Howard Schultz, the president, chairman and CEO of Starbucks Coffee Company. After months of controversy over whether patrons should openly be allowed to carry firearms in the company's stores, Mr. Schultz issued an open letter to his fellow Americans announcing that he would not adopt a no-weapons policy but would kindly request that customers keep their guns at home. The letter appeared (among other places)
SPORTS
April 25, 2007
John Parrish, Orioles reliever What's considered a fun night in Lancaster County, Pa.? "I don't go out in Lancaster. I don't really do anything up there anymore. I just hang out and barbecue somewhere."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 11, 2000
GEORGIE JESSUP, singer-songwriter and champion of Native American heritage, was among the many who protested the devastation of woodlands south of Baltimore for the construction of the gigantic Arundel Mills outlet mall near BWI. One sunny morning last summer, we found Jessup camped on the road leading to the mall's ribbon-cutting, playing a guitar, singing a Lakota song and burning incense. It was Jessup's belief that Arundel Mills not only represented dumb growth in Smart Growth Maryland, but an invasion of ancient Native American sanctuaries.
NEWS
January 31, 1991
Ernest Hemingway once had a Rolls Royce, but he got rid of it because people kept kicking the tires and saying, "they don't make 'em like that anymore."Threadbare as that old cliche may be, it's the perfect description for our Evening Sun colleague who takes leave of daily journalism today after more than four decades of pounding the keys: They don't make 'em like Peter Kumpa anymore. No story was too large or too small for Peter to cover with speed, accuracy and clarity that have made him a legend in his time in Baltimore journalism -- and far beyond.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | July 23, 1991
YOU KNOW what's wrong with every-day living?No one wants to fix anything anymore.No one really wants to work. No one really wants to tune your car in a few hours; get your television set fixed in a few days, your dry cleaning done in 24 hours or your gift exchanged in five minutes.We are a throw-away, disposable society now: ''Don't know when it'll be ready, Mrs. Fidget.'' ''We have to wait for the part, Mrs. Restless.''Tune in to my buyer's woes and the decline of old-time craftsmanship.
NEWS
By Abe Novick | April 20, 2001
ERIC HARRIS. Dylan Klebold. Young Andy Williams. Two years ago today it happened in Columbine. And it keeps happening. A kid blows away his classmates. We are shocked. We are appalled. We stare in disbelief at the news. It makes no sense. Then the questions come. Why? And, who is to blame? The parents, of course. No, it's the media. It's that darn Eminem. All of the above? It's even bigger than that. So before we lock up every kid who looks like a loner and seal off the entrances and exits of every school with armed guards and metal detectors, we should look even deeper into the cause of such actions.
NEWS
By John Gartner | February 14, 2001
PARENTS CAN'T take it anymore. Nationwide they are rising up in rebellion. Against what? Homework. In their popular new book, "The End of Homework," Etta Kralovek and John Buell argue that homework is interfering with, "unstructured leisure time" (like watching TV?), family interaction, religious instruction and "just being a kid." Never mind that the authors acknowledge that there is "some evidence" of a relationship between time spent on homework and academic achievement (especially in older children)
NEWS
August 12, 2013
Thank you Maryland, you've been great. But the best part of you will be seeing you in my rearview mirror for the final time. I can't understand how citizens stand idly by and allow themselves to be taxed nonstop by their current governor, Martin "Owe-Malley. " The rain tax takes more of our money that we can afford. What's next, a sunlight tax? Gun control? How is it that less than 30 minutes away a Virginia resident can purchase a firearm and take possession the same day? Look at their gun crime rates compared to those of Maryland, where we have strict gun control laws in place that do nothing to curtail criminal activity but penalize law-abiding citizens.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cassandra Berube | July 29, 2013
Family. You can't live with them. You can't live without them. Or can you? Deb tried that route. But she ended up saving her darling brother, and so they're left struggling to find out where that leaves them. Besides in the middle of dead bodies and killers. But in a kill-or-be-killed world, maybe it's not so bad to become a predator. The episode opens with Dexter, Debra, and Vogel in a therapy session, trying to work through Debra's attempt at murder-suicide. Debra seeks forgiveness, but Dexter walks out on both of them.
NEWS
April 2, 2013
Maryland has long cherished its nickname of "The Free State. " However, based on a recent ranking by the Mercatus Center at Virginia's George Mason University, Maryland is actually near the bottom of states nationally - 44th out of 50 - in overall freedom. The center's report, "Freedom in the 50 States," provides an aggregate index of how the states' public policies impact economic, social and personal freedoms. Overall personal freedom in Maryland ranks just above that of Illinois.
NEWS
By Jim Salvucci | November 17, 2012
Let's start with something I, as a university administrator, am not supposed to say or even think. The humanities and social sciences, the heart of the liberal arts - its students, its graduates, its practitioners - are doomed. They are doomed to irrelevancy. Doomed to shrinking numbers. Doomed to unemployment and underemployment. Doomed to live eternally in mom and dad's basement, playing video games, dining on chips and salsa, and delivering stuffed crust pizza for a living. That is what we are constantly told, at least.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2012
Looking for something else, I found tucked away in a desk drawer a clipping with a memorable headline from my time at the weekly Flemingsburg Gazette in Flemingsburg, Kentucky, forty years ago. It was on a routine story for the front page. The state was preparing to replace the decrepit bridge over the L&N Railroad tracks in the town of Ewing, and the demolition and construction would make the road unusable for some time. The publisher, not I, wrote the headlines, and I hovered over the page to make sure that no one tampered with it before we went to press.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
It's been years since Maggie Lebherz lived in sunny Spain as a college exchange student. Yet just one taste of fresh olive oil takes her back in spirit. "In 2007, I lived with a family in Salamanca, and my host mother cooked everything in olive oil, in a big cast-iron skillet," recalls Lebherz. "She rarely changed the oil, and it became spiced. Whether she was frying potatoes in olive oil or making paella, every meal was so delicious. " After Lebherz returned to the States and graduated from college, her cravings for the quality olive oil she'd enjoyed abroad turned her into an entrepreneur.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht | August 1, 1997
Offensive highlights: Vinny Testaverde threw the ball exceptionally well in the afternoon session, especially his touch passes. His deep completion to tight end Brian Kinchen, a touchdown toss to tight end Eric Green and several long connections to wide receiver Michael Jackson were among Testaverde's better moments.Defensive highlights: Rookie safety Ralph Staten, learning a new position after a collegiate career as a linebacker at Alabama, shined at the end of yesterday's afternoon session, picking off two passes.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | November 5, 1999
YOU don't belong here any more." She didn't say it with hostility, but she said it nevertheless. An observation, a bland statement of fact between friends. "You don't belong here anymore."We were back home in Los Angeles, my wife Marilyn and I, for our high school reunion. We had given one of our classmates a ride, dropping her off in the old neighborhood, where wrought-iron bars cover every window and cautious people don't venture out after dark.That's when she said it: "You don't belong here anymore.
EXPLORE
September 13, 2012
I said it a few weeks ago in one of these columns, but handing over the coverage of field hockey to Aegis Sports Editor Randy McRoberts has been a bit weird. Some of the coaches still have me on their e mail contact list, and when I see the game recaps starting to hit my inbox early in the evening, I'll start to write that night's field hockey story in my head, which is my normal routine for all the sports that I cover. Then, it hits me that I'm off the field hockey beat, and that it's boys soccer, golf and boys volleyball that I should be concerned with.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Blame it on Lawrence Welk. If you're unfamiliar with that name, members of the American Accordionists' Association will give you an extra-warm welcome to their festival in Baltimore this week. Accordionists in this country have long struggled with the legacy of Welk, the bandleader known for "champagne music" and polkas. His TV show, which aired from the mid-1950s to the early '80s, and then for what seemed an eternity in reruns on PBS, always gave a prominent role to the accordion.
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