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Anxiety Disorders

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May 3, 1994
People who believe their anxieties exceed the everyday worries that touch most everyone can get a free evaluation tomorrow at the conference center of the Sheppard Pratt Hospital.The service is part of National Anxiety Disorders Screening Day, in which about 150 mental health centers across the country will be offering free consultations; dispensing information about symptoms and available treatments and -- when needed -- making referrals to specialists.Anxiety disorders include phobias, obsessive-compulsive behavior, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder and generalized anxiety disorder -- constant, unrealistic worry that affects a person's ability to complete daily activities.
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SPORTS
By From Sun news services | March 30, 2009
The Detroit Tigers placed left-hander Dontrelle Willis on the 15-day disabled list with an anxiety disorder Sunday and put oft-injured reliever Joel Zumaya on the list with a sore right shoulder. General manager Dave Dombrowski said he remains "fairly optimistic" that Willis will return to the major leagues this year. Willis said he has been feeling well on and off the mound. "I'm never depressed at all," he said. "... This is not something where I'm too amped up, I don't know where I'm at, and I'm running sprints up and down the parking lot. ... [The doctors]
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NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | October 31, 2008
Researchers led by Johns Hopkins doctors have found that three popular treatments for childhood anxiety disorders are all effective, but that combining an antidepressant with behavioral therapy is the superior treatment. It is estimated that as many as 20 percent of children suffer from anxiety disorders - the most common psychiatric illness in children - which can cause serious problems in school and in relationships. The authors of the study, released online yesterday by The New England Journal of Medicine, said they hope their work will give doctors confidence about the treatments they prescribe and raise awareness of the seriousness of the disorders.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | December 2, 2008
Nearly half of college-age adults struggle with a mental health disorder, from alcohol dependency to depression and anxiety. But only a quarter seek treatment, according to a study published today. "This study gives a picture of the magnitude of the problem and the extent to which these disorders go untreated," said Dr. Mark Olfson, a professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center and lead author of the study. "It really lays out the challenge of providing services to meet the need, particularly of alcohol use disorders."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | December 3, 1991
State regulators have suspended the license of a Baltimore psychologist who improperly required the parents of his young patients to become patients themselves.The state Board of Examiners of Psychologists found that Dr. Galen S. Marburg, of the 6300 block of Harford Road, diagnosed the parents as having "mood" or "anxiety" disorders, then billed insurance companies for psychotherapy sessions with them that did not occur.In one case, Marburg billed for therapy sessions with the parents on dates when the family was away on vacation.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | April 12, 2008
For a half-century, D-cycloserine has led a quiet, workmanlike existence as an antibiotic, primarily for tuberculosis in developing countries. Its patent has long since expired, and its popularity has waned as newer antibiotics have appeared. But D-cycloserine might now get a second act: A growing number of researchers say the drug could transform the way doctors treat a range of psychiatric ailments, including anxiety, phobia and obsessive-compulsive disorder. It could also help alleviate addiction, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and chronic pain.
NEWS
By Linda Marsa and By Linda Marsa,Special to the Sun | December 22, 2002
The ads seem to be everywhere, on TV, in magazines, doctors' offices, the Internet: Are you feeling tense? Having difficulty sleeping? Scared of criticism? If so, they suggest, the answer could be a pill -- an antidepressant, to be exact. The drugs that revolutionized the treatment of depression a decade ago now are increasingly used to treat anxiety disorders, mental illnesses that can cause paralyzing worry or intense fear of social situations. Caused by a deficiency in brain chemistry, the disorders can indeed be remedied by potent mood-altering medications such as Paxil and Effexor.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1996
The 47-year-old professional woman wasn't sleeping well. She was skipping menstrual periods and fighting the combined forces of anxiety and depression. By the time she was examined by reproductive endocrinologist Marian Damewood, she was taking Prozac and Xanax to manage her mood swings.Like a lot of women in their 40s -- many of whom must deal with children, careers and their changing bodies -- the patient said she did not understand her symptoms, but couldn't afford to keep "losing it."A simple blood test revealed that her symptoms were related to perimenopause -- the transitional years leading up to menopause.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2008
With all the news about the economic crisis, is it any wonder that some of us feel stressed out about our financial futures? Although experiencing some stress may be a reasonable reaction to the global financial situation, feeling deeply anxious during tough economic times doesn't have to be inevitable, says Jack Vaeth, staff psychiatrist at Sheppard Pratt Health System, who also is in private practice in Hunt Valley and Annapolis. Given the reports about the economy these days, is feeling more anxious than usual about our financial futures unavoidable?
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | December 2, 2008
Nearly half of college-age adults struggle with a mental health disorder, from alcohol dependency to depression and anxiety. But only a quarter seek treatment, according to a study published today. "This study gives a picture of the magnitude of the problem and the extent to which these disorders go untreated," said Dr. Mark Olfson, a professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center and lead author of the study. "It really lays out the challenge of providing services to meet the need, particularly of alcohol use disorders."
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | October 31, 2008
Researchers led by Johns Hopkins doctors have found that three popular treatments for childhood anxiety disorders are all effective, but that combining an antidepressant with behavioral therapy is the superior treatment. It is estimated that as many as 20 percent of children suffer from anxiety disorders - the most common psychiatric illness in children - which can cause serious problems in school and in relationships. The authors of the study, released online yesterday by The New England Journal of Medicine, said they hope their work will give doctors confidence about the treatments they prescribe and raise awareness of the seriousness of the disorders.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2008
With all the news about the economic crisis, is it any wonder that some of us feel stressed out about our financial futures? Although experiencing some stress may be a reasonable reaction to the global financial situation, feeling deeply anxious during tough economic times doesn't have to be inevitable, says Jack Vaeth, staff psychiatrist at Sheppard Pratt Health System, who also is in private practice in Hunt Valley and Annapolis. Given the reports about the economy these days, is feeling more anxious than usual about our financial futures unavoidable?
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | April 12, 2008
For a half-century, D-cycloserine has led a quiet, workmanlike existence as an antibiotic, primarily for tuberculosis in developing countries. Its patent has long since expired, and its popularity has waned as newer antibiotics have appeared. But D-cycloserine might now get a second act: A growing number of researchers say the drug could transform the way doctors treat a range of psychiatric ailments, including anxiety, phobia and obsessive-compulsive disorder. It could also help alleviate addiction, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and chronic pain.
NEWS
By Deborah L. Shelton and Deborah L. Shelton,St. Louis Post-Dispatch | September 15, 2006
The only thing standing between Vicki White and a new job as a bank teller was a plastic cup. Like job candidates at many companies, she was required to undergo drug screening. But she has a condition called paruresis, which can make providing a urine sample difficult, if not impossible. Paruresis (pronounced: par-YOU-ree-sis) is a type of social anxiety disorder that prevents a person from using the toilet in a public restroom. To prepare for the test, White, 19, of Wentzville, Mo., guzzled water nonstop before showing up at a testing laboratory last month.
NEWS
By Charles Duhigg and Charles Duhigg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 13, 2005
When millions of Americans abandoned smoking in the 1980s, many health experts and social scientists thought they had tobacco on the run. But in the '90s progress began to slow: From 1990 to 2003, according to federal figures, only 3 percent of Americans gave up their cigarettes. The slowdown prompted many experts to conclude that most of the smokers who could easily quit already had done so. What remained was a hard-core group of Americans who continued to puff away despite significant health risks and severe social stigma.
NEWS
By Linda Marsa and By Linda Marsa,Special to the Sun | December 22, 2002
The ads seem to be everywhere, on TV, in magazines, doctors' offices, the Internet: Are you feeling tense? Having difficulty sleeping? Scared of criticism? If so, they suggest, the answer could be a pill -- an antidepressant, to be exact. The drugs that revolutionized the treatment of depression a decade ago now are increasingly used to treat anxiety disorders, mental illnesses that can cause paralyzing worry or intense fear of social situations. Caused by a deficiency in brain chemistry, the disorders can indeed be remedied by potent mood-altering medications such as Paxil and Effexor.
NEWS
By Charles Duhigg and Charles Duhigg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 13, 2005
When millions of Americans abandoned smoking in the 1980s, many health experts and social scientists thought they had tobacco on the run. But in the '90s progress began to slow: From 1990 to 2003, according to federal figures, only 3 percent of Americans gave up their cigarettes. The slowdown prompted many experts to conclude that most of the smokers who could easily quit already had done so. What remained was a hard-core group of Americans who continued to puff away despite significant health risks and severe social stigma.
SPORTS
By From Sun news services | March 30, 2009
The Detroit Tigers placed left-hander Dontrelle Willis on the 15-day disabled list with an anxiety disorder Sunday and put oft-injured reliever Joel Zumaya on the list with a sore right shoulder. General manager Dave Dombrowski said he remains "fairly optimistic" that Willis will return to the major leagues this year. Willis said he has been feeling well on and off the mound. "I'm never depressed at all," he said. "... This is not something where I'm too amped up, I don't know where I'm at, and I'm running sprints up and down the parking lot. ... [The doctors]
NEWS
By William Hathaway and William Hathaway,Special to the Sun | March 3, 2002
When anxiety hits Betty Simpson, her mind becomes a sort of Daytona 500, where thoughts, worries and fears careen around in a blinding blur. Her hands clutch the steering wheel so tightly her knuckles turn white. Or, trying to outrace her repetitious thoughts, the 42-year-old social worker from Rocky Hill, Conn., loads the dishwasher and starts her laundry, only to ditch both chores and go for a bike ride. "When you go over the edge, you can't concentrate, you can't focus, your memory goes," said Simpson.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1996
The 47-year-old professional woman wasn't sleeping well. She was skipping menstrual periods and fighting the combined forces of anxiety and depression. By the time she was examined by reproductive endocrinologist Marian Damewood, she was taking Prozac and Xanax to manage her mood swings.Like a lot of women in their 40s -- many of whom must deal with children, careers and their changing bodies -- the patient said she did not understand her symptoms, but couldn't afford to keep "losing it."A simple blood test revealed that her symptoms were related to perimenopause -- the transitional years leading up to menopause.
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