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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 6, 2014
Thirty-minute bouts of daily meditation can help ease symptoms of anxiety and depression, a new Johns Hopkins Medicine analysis has found. Researchers at Hopkins analyzed previous studies and found that meditation seemed to provide as much relief for people with mild anxiety and depression as antidepressants. The researchers looked at 47 clinical trials performed through June 2013 involving 3,515 patients. The studies focused on the impact of meditation on mental and physical health issues, including depression, anxiety, stress, insomnia, diabetes, heart disease, cancer and chronic pain.
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NEWS
August 8, 2014
Op-ed writer Nate Greenslit is exactly correct in arguing that it would benefit the proponents of the use of psychedelics to focus the discussion toward the treatment of medical ailments ( "Are psychedelics the next medical marijuana?" Aug. 6). However, unlike medical marijuana, which is primarily being used to treat pain and glaucoma, the benefits to the field of psychotherapy and healing from psychedelics is enormous. Psychedelics actually have the potential cure depression, anxiety, phobias, PTSD and other mental illness.
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FEATURES
By Katie Mercado, For The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
I've seen many brides become so overwhelmed with wedding anxiety, especially related to planning, that they don't get to fully enjoy their day. It's sad to think that you could spend so much time worrying and stressing over what should be an extremely special moment in your life. As soon as I got engaged, I decided to make a list of truths to remember throughout our engagement. This list has and continues to keep me grounded and grateful for this phase in my life. While I'll be excited to finally be married, I'll also be sad to see the door close on my time as a fiancé.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
The anxiety began hours after Laurie Bardon Syphard gave birth to her daughter and grew as the weeks ticked by. Was the baby sleeping enough? Was she malnourished? Dehydrated? Syphard became obsessed with the cleanliness of her daughter's baby bottles, cycling through them in a rigid rotation. She worried that a catastrophe would occur each time they left the house. "I would pack and repack the diaper bag eight times and then never leave," she said. The anxiety was so overwhelming that Syphard sometimes struggled to get out of bed. Syphard, 34, knew that her symptoms were more than the typical jitters of a new parent.
NEWS
By Alex Pavlovic, San Jose Mercury News | April 26, 2012
The San Francisco Giants placed former Oriole Aubrey Huff on the 15-day disabled list Wednesday, two days after he left the team because of an episode of anxiety. Huff has been getting treatment in Florida and is expected to rejoin the team Friday in San Francisco, where he will continue to get help. Manager Bruce Bochy spoke with Huff on Wednesday afternoon after days of exchanging text messages. Asked whether Huff's anxiety was related to personal or baseball problems, Bochy said: "I don't know if he even knows.
FEATURES
By Jamie Bacon, For The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
My fiancé Keith and I just recently had our engagement pictures taken. I was a little stressed over this because I couldn't decide what to wear and didn't know if we should have props or not. I researched a lot online and also asked my friends who have had them done. Everything I saw or heard was different. I was getting conflicting responses because everyone feels differently. I would hear don't wear something you have worn before then I would see something that said make sure you are wearing something you would normally wear.
NEWS
By Dan Buccino | January 9, 2002
WE REMAIN alert to even more unsettling threats in the aftermath of Sept. 11. We are assaulted by things that are both near and well-known (the mail, hollowed-out sneakers) and yet unknown and unfamiliar (invisible microbes, plastic explosives). The war is not just over there happening to them, it's here happening to us, and it can make anyone anxious and hyper-vigilant. Though many are worried, allowing our worries to incapacitate us is neither helpful nor healthy. Freud observed that neurotics seem to do better during times of war and catastrophe.
NEWS
By Andrew Bard Schmookler | April 30, 2001
ORKNEY SPRINGS, Va. - I am devoutly frugal. I hate wasting anything. I won't haul good wood to the landfill or throw out any food leftovers that haven't spoiled. When friends of my son, as guests to our dinner table, regularly put on their dishes a lot more food than they eat, or leave the crust of my homemade bread on their plates to be thrown out, I feel offended at some spiritual level that matters to me. I am gratified when I use something completely, like a Bic pen I've emptied of its total supply of ink or the 1972 Datsun wagon I only barely managed to drive to where it was to be junked.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | November 4, 2001
After witnessing the horror of Sept. 11, Kathy Pinney of Ruxton knew she needed to take steps to keep herself calm. So since that day, she has attended yoga class three times a week, stretching and flexing her way to inner peace. What had been a casual interest has now become a devotion. "I don't know where I'd be without it," says Pinney, 48, who grew up in the Bronx and remembers watching the World Trade Center being built when she was a child. "This has kept me focused and centered and real.
FEATURES
By Natalie Angier and Natalie Angier,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 10, 1996
They are the type of people who own a one-sided bed: the wrong side. They're often anxious, grumpy and self-pitying, viewing the past with regret, the present with suspicion and the future with dread. The traditional tag for them is neurotic, but a better word is kvetch.Now it seems that people who are prone to anxiety and pessimism may have drawn a short stick, genetically speaking. Scientists have discovered a modest but measurable link between anxiety-related behavior and the gene that controls the brain's ability to use serotonin, an essential neurochemical.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
I recently adopted a 4-year-old beagle who's very sweet and very high-strung. He has to be with me all the time and seems to be a nervous wreck much of the time, pacing and panting and barking at every little noise. We're new to each other, but do you have suggestions on ways I might get him to calm down a bit? Congrats on adopting a new pet!  It takes four to six weeks for dogs to get acclimated to their new family and surroundings.  However, he may be starting to show the signs of separation anxiety.
HEALTH
By Abigail Green, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Meditation seems to be everywhere lately - on talk shows, in yoga studios, even on our smartphones. A recent Time magazine cover story announced that we're in the midst of "The Mindful Revolution. " Celebrities including hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons and Ellen DeGeneres promote the benefits of meditation, and how-to classes abound. The ancient practice is gaining traction in the mainstream and in medicine. Studies show that regular meditators boast the ability to tune out distractions and even lower blood pressure and reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| January 25, 2014
When a tragedy strikes -- whether it's a shooting like the one at The Mall in Columbia, or one of the seemingly endless string of school shootings across the country -- it's often difficult to know how to discuss these incidents with your children. Tell them too much and you could add to their anxiety. Tell them too little and they may be confused and scared without the reassurance they need. The Johns Hopkins Children's Center's website offers these tips from child psychiatrist Patrick Kelly, M.D. and child  psychologist Renee DeBoard-Lucas, Ph.D.: "Deal with your own anxiety first: Do not start a conversation with your child until you have calmed down and the initial shock has worn off. Children have perfect radars for parental moods and can easily sense when something is off. Anxious parents can transmit their own anxiety to children, a phenomenon known as “ trickle-down anxiety .” Timing is everything: Start out by finding out how much the child knows already.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 6, 2014
Thirty-minute bouts of daily meditation can help ease symptoms of anxiety and depression, a new Johns Hopkins Medicine analysis has found. Researchers at Hopkins analyzed previous studies and found that meditation seemed to provide as much relief for people with mild anxiety and depression as antidepressants. The researchers looked at 47 clinical trials performed through June 2013 involving 3,515 patients. The studies focused on the impact of meditation on mental and physical health issues, including depression, anxiety, stress, insomnia, diabetes, heart disease, cancer and chronic pain.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 24, 2013
Here we go again, with another call for a crackdown on panhandlers in Baltimore. The City Council, which recently provided millions of dollars in public financing for the big private development at Harbor Point - offices, hotels, residences - is considering legislation to make it tougher for the penniless to beg on our sidewalks. A council committee already gave the crackdown the thumbs-up. Nice. Maybe if panhandlers could afford a lobbyist or a public-relations company - or maybe if they took up a collection now and then and made campaign donations - they, too, could benefit from the council's generous tendencies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Marin Alsop's tenure as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has been notable for several things, prominent among them the programming of compositions by Leonard Bernstein, her childhood idol and mentor when she was starting her conducting career in the 1980s. Among the most sizzling performances the BSO has given with Alsop over the years have been those of Bernstein works - the genre-bending "Mass" and two of his three emotionally complex symphonies, No. 1, "Jeremiah," and No. 3, "Kaddish.
TRAVEL
By Betsy Wade and Betsy Wade,New York Times News Service | February 21, 1999
How much to tip is an anxiety-provoking question that follows a traveler from airport to hotel to restaurant, nationally and internationally. Do you tip a hotel-room housekeeper? How about the masseuse? The golf pro? A restaurant's captain? The general manager of the Inn at Union Square in San Francisco, which has banned tipping, says the ban ranks high on guests' lists of favorite features. But few have followed this lead. Generally, tipping is the custom throughout America. Customs overseas are usually noted in guide books, though the size of tips may not be specified.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | September 21, 2012
Those who exercise may already recognize that it immediately reduces their stress. But it may also help keep anxiety at bay well after the exertion, new research from the University of Maryland School of Public Health suggests. A period of moderate exercise and a period of rest both lowered stress shortly afterward, according to the study lead by J. Carson Smith, assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology . But only those who exercised experience prolonged stress relief.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin,
For The Baltimore Sun and By Karen Nitkin,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 26, 2013
As the school year approaches, Colleen Geisen, who lives in the Baltimore community of Mount Washington, believes her three children are ready. Ellis, who is starting kindergarten, is already familiar with the school building because of his older siblings. Tatum, who is starting third grade, is comfortable with the routine of elementary school. But Xaviera is going into middle school, and that's uncharted territory for the family. “What I'm worried about is, is she ready for the course load?
FEATURES
By Jamie Bacon, For The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
My fiancé Keith and I just recently had our engagement pictures taken. I was a little stressed over this because I couldn't decide what to wear and didn't know if we should have props or not. I researched a lot online and also asked my friends who have had them done. Everything I saw or heard was different. I was getting conflicting responses because everyone feels differently. I would hear don't wear something you have worn before then I would see something that said make sure you are wearing something you would normally wear.
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