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By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | September 7, 1997
25 years agoThe public is invited to participate in "A day at Antrim" on Sept. 9. This event will be held at the pre-Civil War mansion of George W. Crouse in Taneytown. Since a highlight will be guided tours of the historic house, guests are requested to wear low-heeled shoes. -- Carroll Record, Sept. 7, 1972.50 years agoAn automobile show will be one of the added features of Westminster Days, sponsored by the Retail Merchants Association of Westminster, to be held Sept. 25 and 26. The "Buying in Westminster" event will afford citizens standard merchandise at marked-down prices, in addition to new lines of fall apparel and other goods.
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NEWS
By Donna Rifkind and Donna Rifkind,special to the sun | February 16, 1997
February's novels are remarkable for a stunning variety of settings, from the rural South to Paris and St. Petersburg, from inner-city Los Angeles to cyberspace and beyond.Brian Keith Jackson, a first-time novelist, debuts this month with "The View From Here" (Pocket, 229 pages, $22), a black family drama set in a small town in Mississippi. Anna Anderson Thomas, the mother of five boys, finds herself pregnant again just as her husband is laid off at the local lumber mill.To Anna's horror, her husband vows to give the baby to his childless sister, the harsh wife of a minister.
NEWS
December 18, 1996
A Taneytown woman injured in a car accident Sunday remained hospitalized in serious condition yesterday.Police said Sherrie L. Smith, 20, of the first block of Memorial Drive, was traveling south on Francis Scott Key Highway near Crouse Mill Road when she hit a patch of ice about 4: 20 p.m. Her car skidded across the northbound lane, struck an embankment and rolled into a field, police said. Police said Smith was not wearing seat belts and was ejected from her 1987 Mercury Cougar.Smith was transported to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, where she remains hospitalized, a spokeswoman said.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | March 4, 2001
DAYS BEFORE the Great Chefs Dinner, a glittering extravaganza held this week at the Center Club, the Dover sole was in doubt and the lettuce appeared to be lost. When Lynn Kennedy-Tilyou, the chef at Antrim 1844 Country Inn, who was in charge of the meal, first went in search of sole, the news was not good. She was told that the area of the Baltic Sea where the sole were supposed to be swimming was temporarily closed to fishing. In the chef's plan, the fish was going to be her first course, a roulade of Dover sole stuffed with a roasted pepper and scallops mousseline.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | September 30, 1993
Carroll County's choices of catering facilities could expand if the county commissioners approve an amendment to regulations governing country inns.Responding to Michael Gross' request in March, the Planning and Zoning Commission has recommended that the county allow country inns to cater private parties and receptions on site.Currently, outside caterers must be hired to provide food for parties or receptions at country inns.Mr. Gross is the owner of the Bowling Brook country inn in Middleburg and the Westminster Inn, a bed and breakfast.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | September 11, 1994
Antrim 1844, 30 Trevanion Road, Taneytown, (410) 756-6812. Open every day for dinner. Major credit cards. No-smoking area: yes. Prices: $50 prix fixe. ** 1/2Earlier this year the owners of Antrim 1844, one of the most elegant inns in the area, decided to open the doors of their restaurant to the public. I knew very little about it except that Dorothy and Richard Mollett had made two important hires: Sharon Ashburn, who had worked at the Pavilion and Tabrizi's, was the executive chef and Stewart Dearie, formerly of the Conservatory, was maitre d'hotel and general manager.
NEWS
By Padraig O'Malley | November 30, 1993
JUST two months ago, on the heels of the Israeli-Palestinian peace accord, predictions of an end to the 25-year struggle in Northern Ireland were widespread.A peace initiative led by the head of the Social Democratic and Labor Party, John Hume, and supported by Gerry Adams, leader of Sinn Fein, the Irish Republican Army's political wing, spurred further optimism.But such hopes are misplaced. A string of 23 deaths in eight days made October the worst month for casualties in Northern Ireland since June 1976.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2004
Against the backdrop of an elegant 19th-century mansion, state and Carroll County education officials announced this week plans to pilot a mentoring program aimed at encouraging new teachers to stick with the profession. Concerned about startling statistics on retention - one state school official said nearly two-thirds of new teachers leave the classroom by the end of their third year - officials are focusing on mentoring as a way to help teachers through their first two years. "We're giving them a window of what some of the opportunities are and the support systems" that are available to beginning teachers, said state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | July 15, 1992
TANEYTOWN -- The innkeepers at Antrim 1844 will open a public restaurant next month where waiters in tuxedos will serve five-course meals.Richard and Dorothy Mollett have converted the smokehouse, summer kitchen and slave quarters, which join the main house, into a restaurant with seating for 50 people.The three rooms have red brick floors and walls and are filled with tables with white cloths and high-backed red plaid chairs. The Molletts say the atmosphere is that of an English country pub."
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | May 12, 2002
I've never been to a restaurant that illustrates the axiom "If you have to ask how much it costs, you can't afford it" as well as Antrim 1844 does. The graceful antebellum mansion, now an inn and restaurant, is particularly beautiful this time of year. The late afternoon sun streams into the elegantly appointed rooms, and a breeze stirs the newly green trees just outside the tall windows. Of course, the setting isn't quite as rural as it used to be. The former plantation is now surrounded by housing developments, which are -- luckily --mostly hidden by the magnificent trees and other plantings on the grounds of the inn. The six-course dinner, served at 7 p.m., is a fixed price; it costs $62.50.
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