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Antonio Vivaldi

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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE Sun | July 29, 1999
Posterity hasn't always tipped its cap respectfully in the direction of Antonio Vivaldi, the facile composer of the baroque era whose many works won him acclaim at the Austrian imperial court and in his native Italy.The great Igor Stravinsky once dismissed Vivaldi as "a dull fellow who could compose the same form over and so many times over."Our baroque-smitten record-buying public has overruled Stravinsky's curmudgeonly verdict.None of Vivaldi's 700-plus compositions is better loved than his pictorial set of four concertos for solo violin and string orchestra, "The Four Seasons."
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NEWS
By Eileen Soskin and Eileen Soskin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2005
Hardly anyone can resist tapping their toes to the music of Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741), one of the most famous and important Italian composers of the Baroque period. His music is infectious, charming and impassioned. At 8 p.m. Saturday, the Candlelight Concert Series presents REBEL (pronounced "re-Bell"), an early-music ensemble in an all-Vivaldi concert of concerti and sonatas. The concert's title ("Antonio Vivaldi: Shades of Red") refers to the composer's nickname, the Red-Headed Priest, and also implies a vividness that will be apparent in the music and the performance.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 17, 2002
The wise guy who dismissed baroque music as "Muzak for the intelligentsia" may have had his opinion, but the record-buying public goes right on laughing in his face. With its energetic hustle and bustle mingling with ascensions to the spiritual summit a la Johann Pachelbel's ubiquitous Canon and J.S. Bach's otherworldly Air on a G String, the baroque idiom continues to enchant. One of its newest and most effective practitioners, violinist Giuliano Carmignola, comes to Alumni Hall at the Naval Academy Tuesday night for an evening of concertos by Antonio Vivaldi.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 17, 2002
The wise guy who dismissed baroque music as "Muzak for the intelligentsia" may have had his opinion, but the record-buying public goes right on laughing in his face. With its energetic hustle and bustle mingling with ascensions to the spiritual summit a la Johann Pachelbel's ubiquitous Canon and J.S. Bach's otherworldly Air on a G String, the baroque idiom continues to enchant. One of its newest and most effective practitioners, violinist Giuliano Carmignola, comes to Alumni Hall at the Naval Academy Tuesday night for an evening of concertos by Antonio Vivaldi.
NEWS
By Eileen Soskin and Eileen Soskin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2005
Hardly anyone can resist tapping their toes to the music of Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741), one of the most famous and important Italian composers of the Baroque period. His music is infectious, charming and impassioned. At 8 p.m. Saturday, the Candlelight Concert Series presents REBEL (pronounced "re-Bell"), an early-music ensemble in an all-Vivaldi concert of concerti and sonatas. The concert's title ("Antonio Vivaldi: Shades of Red") refers to the composer's nickname, the Red-Headed Priest, and also implies a vividness that will be apparent in the music and the performance.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | April 21, 2007
It used to be said that I Love Lucy was being broadcast somewhere in the world just about every hour of the day. My guess is that the classical music equivalent of such ubiquity would be Antonio Vivaldi's The Four Seasons. Although the 1725 piece hardly registered in the public consciousness 40 or 50 years ago, it is never out of earshot now, not when you figure in all the 18th-century-saturated programming of classical radio stations and the baroque-heavy repertoire piped into elevators and lobbies.
NEWS
January 8, 2004
The Columbia Orchestra will present a Musical Instrument Petting Zoo at 3 p.m. Saturday at Wilde Lake Interfaith Center, 10431 Twin Rivers Road, Columbia. The event is co-sponsored by Music & Arts Centers. The event will allow people of all ages to see, hear, touch and play orchestra instruments. The orchestra will be led by Assistant Conductor Glenn Quader. Music director Jason Love will narrate "Mr. Smith's Composition," a piece that introduces young children to the instruments and music of the orchestra.
NEWS
January 8, 2004
The Columbia Orchestra will present a Musical Instrument Petting Zoo at 3 p.m. Saturday at the Wilde Lake Interfaith Center, 10431 Twin Rivers Road, Columbia. The event is co-sponsored by Music & Arts Centers. The event will allow people of all ages to see, hear, touch and play orchestra instruments. The orchestra will be led by Assistant Conductor Glenn Quader. Music director Jason Love will narrate "Mr. Smith's Composition," a piece that introduces young children to the instruments and music of the orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | April 28, 2002
This may not be the best time to recall a priest who surrounded himself with young girls, but we're not talking about anything remotely scandalous. Antonio Vivaldi, the Italian composer most famous for his violin concertos called The Four Seasons, was ordained a priest in 1703. That same year, he became music director at Pio Ospedale della Pieta, a home and school for orphaned and abandoned girls, in Venice. Vivaldi taught violin and churned out compositions for the institution's extraordinary all-girl orchestra.
NEWS
March 24, 1991
The Capital Saxophone Quartet, the award-winning saxophone ensemble known for its versatile mix of classical, jazz and contemporary music, will herald the arrival of spring at Western Maryland College on Sunday, April 7 during the season-closing presentation of the Sundays of Note performance series.For its second appearance at Sundays ofNote in three years, the quartet will present the premiere of its first commissioned work, "Constellations," by Baltimore composer G.S. Geiger.In addition, the quartet will offer La Primavera by Antonio Vivaldi; Trois Pices by Isaac Albniz, arranged by Giuseppe Mul; Orfeo Suite, by Claudio Monteverdi; Quatuor, Op. 102 by Florent Schmitt; the traditional "That's a-Plenty," arranged by Paul Nagle; and "St. Louis Blues," arranged by Bill Holcombe.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE Sun | July 29, 1999
Posterity hasn't always tipped its cap respectfully in the direction of Antonio Vivaldi, the facile composer of the baroque era whose many works won him acclaim at the Austrian imperial court and in his native Italy.The great Igor Stravinsky once dismissed Vivaldi as "a dull fellow who could compose the same form over and so many times over."Our baroque-smitten record-buying public has overruled Stravinsky's curmudgeonly verdict.None of Vivaldi's 700-plus compositions is better loved than his pictorial set of four concertos for solo violin and string orchestra, "The Four Seasons."
NEWS
May 17, 2000
Visit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to www.4Kids.org/detectives/ * What's the scientific name for Monarch butterflies? * To which era of music does Frederick Chopin belong? * What's the value of the beads in the upper deck of an abacus? BUG OUT The whole world is bugging out. There are millions of busy, crawling, munching creatures all over the planet, so you may as well get in on the invasion. Buzz over to www.insecta-inspecta.com and join the cyber-colony of insect maniacs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | December 4, 2003
Baroque treats Looks like a very good weekend to hear music from long ago performed on the kinds of instruments heard long ago. On Saturday, the French Baroque Music Series, presented by the French Embassy, French American Cultural Foundation and An Die Musik, offers a program by Le Concert Spirituel, one of France's leading early-music ensembles. Founder Herve Niquet will lead the concert, which includes works by Antoine Morel, Joseph Bodin de Boismortier and Jean-Marie Leclair. There will be room, too, for something decidedly non-French - a bit of Giacchino Rossini's comic opera Il signor Bruschino.
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