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Antonio Salieri

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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
The marvel of Mozart is not just the effortless stream of perfectly constructed, sublimely beautiful music that poured from him. There's also something terribly fascinating about the crass humor that he dished out with equal flair. Peter Shaffer uses that juxtaposition of the pure and the puerile as a major element in his hit play "Amadeus," a 1979 work now enjoying an earnest revival at Fells Point Corner Theatre. The playwright only had to delve into Mozart's letters, along with a few of his less familiar compositions, to find a gold mine of scatological drollery.
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By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
In a letter to his father, a 25-year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart declared: "I pay no attention whatever to anybody's praise or blame. … I simply follow my own feelings. " This self-confidence is just one of the revered composer's traits explored in Peter Shaffer's play "Amadeus," which Center Stage is reviving for its season-opener. A few other Mozart characteristics, including behavior still not considered kosher in polite society, also pepper this colorful mix of fact and fiction.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 25, 2004
If Antonio Salieri is ever to have another day in the sun, it may be thanks to irresistible Italian mezzo-soprano Cecilia Bartoli, currently following up on her recent all-Salieri CD with a U.S. concert tour. Salieri, maligned by the popular play and film Amadeus as the mortal, insanely jealous enemy of Mozart, may not be top-drawer - most of his harmonic progressions are just too safe and predictable, many of his melodies too bland. But he was a genuine talent nonetheless. His music clearly deserves the occasional revival, and you couldn't get more vivid proponents than the brilliant Bartoli and her equally arresting backup band, England's Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
The marvel of Mozart is not just the effortless stream of perfectly constructed, sublimely beautiful music that poured from him. There's also something terribly fascinating about the crass humor that he dished out with equal flair. Peter Shaffer uses that juxtaposition of the pure and the puerile as a major element in his hit play "Amadeus," a 1979 work now enjoying an earnest revival at Fells Point Corner Theatre. The playwright only had to delve into Mozart's letters, along with a few of his less familiar compositions, to find a gold mine of scatological drollery.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | October 19, 2007
Rick Ray's 10 Questions for the Dalai Lama, a documentary that uses as its centerpiece a one-hour interview with the spiritual leader of the Tibetan people, will be shown at 7 p.m. Sunday and 7:30 p.m. Monday at Your Prescription for Health Learning Center, 10210 S. Dolfield Road in Owings Mills. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased at the door, if available, or by calling 410-356-2169. Information: spiritualpath@mindspring.com or 410-581-9022. A film for the `Cure' Adventures for the Cure, narrated by three-time Tour de France winner Greg Lemond, documents a 6,500-mile cross-country bicycle trip that raises money for the American Diabetes Association and Kupenda for the Children, which benefits African children with disabilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
In a letter to his father, a 25-year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart declared: "I pay no attention whatever to anybody's praise or blame. … I simply follow my own feelings. " This self-confidence is just one of the revered composer's traits explored in Peter Shaffer's play "Amadeus," which Center Stage is reviving for its season-opener. A few other Mozart characteristics, including behavior still not considered kosher in polite society, also pepper this colorful mix of fact and fiction.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | December 29, 1996
IN 1808, 11-YEAR-OLD Franz Peter Schubert presented himself before the examiners of the School of the Imperial and Royal Court Chapel in Vienna to apply for one of two vacancies that had been announced in the local newspapers.He so impressed the examiners -- who included the dean of Viennese musicians, Antonio Salieri -- that he was accepted immediately and received free tuition, room and board at the school. For the next five years, young Schubert devoted himself to absorbing the great variety of music he encountered as a member of the court choir and orchestra.
FEATURES
By New York Times | December 3, 1991
Since his death 200 years ago this week, music lovers have wondered what killed Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.Physicians and musicologists have their pet culprits: strep, rheumatic fever or even poisoning at the hand of Antonio Salieri, the jealous court composer.Now a British researcher has a new theory -- Mozart was a victim of his own physician and the primitive medicine of his day.Dr. Ian James of London's Royal Free Hospital advanced the lTC idea at a recent meeting of the British Association for Performing Arts of Medicine, according to the current issue of Physician's Weekly.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2004
Salieri strikes back Poor Antonio Salieri. His brilliant career as a composer was going wonderfully until Mozart showed up. After that, it was all downhill. Salieri was not only overshadowed by Mozart; he even got hounded by suspicions that he was somehow responsible for Mozart's death. Thanks to the play and movie Amadeus, Salieri's reputation took a particularly rough turn. But, thanks to phenomenal mezzo-soprano Cecilia Bartoli, his talent just might start to get the respect it deserves.
NEWS
By Reported by Frank P.L. Somerville | January 6, 1995
"Medical Ethics and Pastoral Care" will be discussed by a broad sample of Baltimore-area clergy, physicians and other health-care professionals in a public program beginning at 9 a.m. Tuesday at Union Memorial Hospital.The seminar, scheduled to conclude at 3:30 p.m. at the hospital, University Parkway and Calvert Street, is co-sponsored by the Central Maryland Ecumenical Council and the McKendree School, an interfaith college of religion in Baltimore.The Rev. Clyde Shallenberger, who was chaplain of Johns Hopkins Hospital for many years before his recent retirement, will preside at the opening session on "The Patient's Best Interest."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | October 19, 2007
Rick Ray's 10 Questions for the Dalai Lama, a documentary that uses as its centerpiece a one-hour interview with the spiritual leader of the Tibetan people, will be shown at 7 p.m. Sunday and 7:30 p.m. Monday at Your Prescription for Health Learning Center, 10210 S. Dolfield Road in Owings Mills. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased at the door, if available, or by calling 410-356-2169. Information: spiritualpath@mindspring.com or 410-581-9022. A film for the `Cure' Adventures for the Cure, narrated by three-time Tour de France winner Greg Lemond, documents a 6,500-mile cross-country bicycle trip that raises money for the American Diabetes Association and Kupenda for the Children, which benefits African children with disabilities.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 25, 2004
If Antonio Salieri is ever to have another day in the sun, it may be thanks to irresistible Italian mezzo-soprano Cecilia Bartoli, currently following up on her recent all-Salieri CD with a U.S. concert tour. Salieri, maligned by the popular play and film Amadeus as the mortal, insanely jealous enemy of Mozart, may not be top-drawer - most of his harmonic progressions are just too safe and predictable, many of his melodies too bland. But he was a genuine talent nonetheless. His music clearly deserves the occasional revival, and you couldn't get more vivid proponents than the brilliant Bartoli and her equally arresting backup band, England's Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | December 29, 1996
IN 1808, 11-YEAR-OLD Franz Peter Schubert presented himself before the examiners of the School of the Imperial and Royal Court Chapel in Vienna to apply for one of two vacancies that had been announced in the local newspapers.He so impressed the examiners -- who included the dean of Viennese musicians, Antonio Salieri -- that he was accepted immediately and received free tuition, room and board at the school. For the next five years, young Schubert devoted himself to absorbing the great variety of music he encountered as a member of the court choir and orchestra.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2000
The last concert composer Franz Joseph Haydn attended before his death took place in Vienna on March 27, 1808. The program consisted of a single work, Haydn's own oratorio, "The Creation," an extraordinary musical account he'd composed more than a decade earlier of the Book of Genesis. When conductor Antonio Salieri's chorus blazed in with that thumping C major chord at "And there was light" near the beginning of the piece, the enthusiastic audience immediately burst into applause. Haydn, a feeble 76-year-old with only a few months to live, pointed heavenward and said, "Not from me -- from there above comes everything."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 5, 2005
In case you haven't heard, one of today's greatest conductors has been booted out of one of history's greatest opera houses in one of the juiciest scandals to hit the classical music biz in ages. Bowing to the inevitable, Riccardo Muti resigned Saturday as principal conductor (and untitled ruler) of La Scala in Milan - an announcement that hit news desks heavily preoccupied with events in another Italian city. The action follows charges and countercharges, at least one firing (the superintendent of the opera house, perceived as a Muti foe)
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