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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 23, 2004
He wore perpetually baggy trousers and shirt collars a couple of sizes too big for his neck. He clearly enjoyed meals, and was never happier than when he was washing them down with a Pilsner beer. His prominent nose, bald head and barrel chest gave him the look of a simple, solid-stock Austrian farmhand, and he even spoke in a peasant dialect. But Anton Bruckner was a decidedly noble composer who built mighty cathedrals of sound and purity. Although anyone is welcome to join his congregations, the pews aren't always full.
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By Mary Johnson, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Live Arts Maryland music director J. Ernest Green conducted the Annapolis Chorale Chamber Chorus, Annapolis Chamber Orchestra and soloists last weekend in performances of works by three of the world's finest composers, filling St. Anne's Episcopal Church in Annapolis with glorious sound. Stellar music is a Green hallmark, but he also knows how to entertain and inform - as is his custom, the conductor gave audience members insight into his musical choices, exploring the common musical thread uniting the three pieces on the program: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's "Vesperae solennes de confessore," Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach's Keyboard Concerto in E-major and Anton Bruckner's Requiem in D-minor.
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | May 19, 2007
Leonardo da Vinci thought that our souls are composed of harmony. Whenever I hear music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart or Anton Bruckner, I'm inclined to agree. If you go The BSO performs at 8 p.m. Friday and 3 p.m. Sunday at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 8 p.m. Saturday at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda. $25-$55. 410-783-8000, baltimoresymphony.org.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
Course in amateur radio The Anne Arundel Radio Club offers an entry-level amateur radio technician license course in six sessions from 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays starting March 8 at the Davidsonville Recreation Center, 3727 Queen Anne Bridge Road. The course covers all modern aspects of ham radio. Free hand-held radios will be given (while supplies last) upon successful completion of the course and license exam. To register and more information, go to w3vpr.org or email kk4gv@w3vpr.org . Classical music The Annapolis Symphony Orchestra presents "Austrian Melodies" at 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Feb. 28-March 1 at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, 801 Chase St. in Annapolis.
NEWS
February 7, 2014
Classical music concerts The Annapolis Symphony Orchestra presents "Austrian Melodies" at 8 p.m. Feb. 28 and March 1 at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, 801 Chase St. in Annapolis. Program pays homage to the birthplace of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Anton Bruckner. In conjunction with these concerts, St. John's College and the orchestra will hold a panel discussion on Bruckner's Symphony No. 7 at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 18 in the Conversation Room at the college, 60 College Ave. Concert tickets are $25, $10 for students.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 2005
From the stirring rendition of "The Star Spangled Banner" that started the evening to the standing ovation that closed it, the Annapolis Chorale's season-opening program lived up to its Heaven and Earth title. Music Director J. Ernest Green conducted the chorale, the Annapolis Chamber Orchestra and soloists in a performance that seemed to be earthbound only during its patriotic opening segment, which featured chorale members singing the National Anthem from the aisles. Other American works performed Saturday included Aaron Copland's Fanfare for the Common Man, originally commissioned as a salute to those who served during World War II, and Samuel Barber's Adagio for Strings, which increasingly seems to express the profundity of post-9/11 feelings for our country and its defenders who remain in harm's way. In his preconcert lecture, Green described the central work of the first half of the program - Anton Bruckner's Te Deum as, "a glimpse into the mind and faith of Bruckner with the chorus and soloists functioning as sections of the orchestra."
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 4, 2006
If you want to clear out a room of music lovers, just throw a little Anton Bruckner into it and watch them scatter. Otherwise rational, broad-minded folks have been known to get twitchy at the mere mention of his music, downright squirmy at the sound of it. Eminent 19th-century conductor Hans von Bulow wasn't exactly alone when he dismissed Bruckner's symphonies as "the anti-musical ravings of a half-wit." Some of us have a hard time understanding such responses. After all, with Bruckner we're not talking atonality or thorny complexity.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Live Arts Maryland music director J. Ernest Green conducted the Annapolis Chorale Chamber Chorus, Annapolis Chamber Orchestra and soloists last weekend in performances of works by three of the world's finest composers, filling St. Anne's Episcopal Church in Annapolis with glorious sound. Stellar music is a Green hallmark, but he also knows how to entertain and inform - as is his custom, the conductor gave audience members insight into his musical choices, exploring the common musical thread uniting the three pieces on the program: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's "Vesperae solennes de confessore," Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach's Keyboard Concerto in E-major and Anton Bruckner's Requiem in D-minor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will be announcing its 2014-2015 season in a few weeks. As is the case every year, I am hoping for a whole bunch of surprises, a filling in of long-standing gaps in the BSO's repertoire. And, naturally, I am especially hoping to hear more of my favorite stuff (it's all about me, as you know). In the same way the BSO and its audiences should be getting a wider sampling of guest conductors (off hand, I can think of Osmo Vanska, Jaap van Zweden, Manfred Honeck, Benjamin Zander and the apparently indefatigable Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2004
Arts Edna Emmet turns the focus of her paintings to Inanna, a goddess of the ancient Sumerians. page 14 Stage A performance by the Concert Artists of Baltimore includes a piece by 19th century, late-romantic Austrian composer Anton Bruckner paired with 20th- and 21st-century postmodernist American composer John Adams. page 12 Scene Red Emma's Bookstore and Coffeehouse, a new venture run by a 15-person collective, has opened on St. Paul Street. page 26 Trips Berlin -- the one in Maryland, of course -- gears up for the holiday season during its annual Victorian Christmas weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will be announcing its 2014-2015 season in a few weeks. As is the case every year, I am hoping for a whole bunch of surprises, a filling in of long-standing gaps in the BSO's repertoire. And, naturally, I am especially hoping to hear more of my favorite stuff (it's all about me, as you know). In the same way the BSO and its audiences should be getting a wider sampling of guest conductors (off hand, I can think of Osmo Vanska, Jaap van Zweden, Manfred Honeck, Benjamin Zander and the apparently indefatigable Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos)
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | May 19, 2007
Leonardo da Vinci thought that our souls are composed of harmony. Whenever I hear music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart or Anton Bruckner, I'm inclined to agree. If you go The BSO performs at 8 p.m. Friday and 3 p.m. Sunday at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 8 p.m. Saturday at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda. $25-$55. 410-783-8000, baltimoresymphony.org.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 4, 2006
If you want to clear out a room of music lovers, just throw a little Anton Bruckner into it and watch them scatter. Otherwise rational, broad-minded folks have been known to get twitchy at the mere mention of his music, downright squirmy at the sound of it. Eminent 19th-century conductor Hans von Bulow wasn't exactly alone when he dismissed Bruckner's symphonies as "the anti-musical ravings of a half-wit." Some of us have a hard time understanding such responses. After all, with Bruckner we're not talking atonality or thorny complexity.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 2005
From the stirring rendition of "The Star Spangled Banner" that started the evening to the standing ovation that closed it, the Annapolis Chorale's season-opening program lived up to its Heaven and Earth title. Music Director J. Ernest Green conducted the chorale, the Annapolis Chamber Orchestra and soloists in a performance that seemed to be earthbound only during its patriotic opening segment, which featured chorale members singing the National Anthem from the aisles. Other American works performed Saturday included Aaron Copland's Fanfare for the Common Man, originally commissioned as a salute to those who served during World War II, and Samuel Barber's Adagio for Strings, which increasingly seems to express the profundity of post-9/11 feelings for our country and its defenders who remain in harm's way. In his preconcert lecture, Green described the central work of the first half of the program - Anton Bruckner's Te Deum as, "a glimpse into the mind and faith of Bruckner with the chorus and soloists functioning as sections of the orchestra."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 23, 2004
He wore perpetually baggy trousers and shirt collars a couple of sizes too big for his neck. He clearly enjoyed meals, and was never happier than when he was washing them down with a Pilsner beer. His prominent nose, bald head and barrel chest gave him the look of a simple, solid-stock Austrian farmhand, and he even spoke in a peasant dialect. But Anton Bruckner was a decidedly noble composer who built mighty cathedrals of sound and purity. Although anyone is welcome to join his congregations, the pews aren't always full.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 12, 1998
The music directorship of David Zinman ended last night with a mighty thunderclap. Part of the noise was from the Meyerhoff Hall audience that roared its acclamation at the end of the program, when the conductor finished his 13-year tenure as the Baltimore Symphony's music director. Most of it came from the magnificent clangor created by the orchestra and its conductor.The single work of the evening was Anton Bruckner's Symphony No. 8 in C Minor, one of the most challenging works in the standard symphonic repertory.
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