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By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2011
There's a new animal reigning atop home decor. Cheetah, tiger, and leopard prints and other pieces are sharing space — peacefully — with deer- and moose-inspired merchandise. And while the trend seems made for the coming holiday season, home decor experts expect that it will continue well into next year. The thought of antlers on a wall might bring to mind elements of taxidermy rather than the trappings of decor. But antlers aren't reserved for man caves and hunting lodges.
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SPORTS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
Here's a look at Super Bowl MVP Joe Flacco's appearance on the "Late Show with David Letterman" Monday, courtesy of CBS: Flacco, who walked out to a standing ovation from the audience as Paul Shaffer and the CBS Orchestra played “We Are the Champions,” talked about his contract negotiations with the Ravens: Letterman:  “I read something today about you, and this is a contract negotiation year, and before the game, what did your...
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NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | November 30, 1992
So what if the Grinch had the idea first.That didn't stop a group of pet owners from dressing up their dogs up as reindeer for a contest at the Severna Park Jaycees holiday festival yesterday.But the Grinch had more luck making his dog pull the sleigh full of toys than Kristin Stolkovich had with her Jack Russell terrier, Spot.Spot, a bit overwhelmed by her fake fur and antlers, scampered away in fear as Kristin tried to tie her to the little red wagon.A German shepherd named Echo was less intimidated by her wagon full of toys.
SPORTS
February 2, 2013
Mitch Ross, the supplement maker who allegedly provided deer antler velvet spray to Ravens inside linebacker Ray Lewis, said during a news conference Friday that he's received death threats from angry Ravens fans. Ross didn't provide any specific information about the alleged threats, though. "It's unfortunate that I'm getting death threats from Ravens fans," said a sleeveless Ross, who was wearing a black skull cap and displaying bottles of the spray and other products, including performance chips, which aren't banned by the NFL. "I got duped by Sports Illustrated.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | November 30, 2006
Last year, Bill Crutchfield Sr. made a run at the big bucks in Maryland's "Diamond Jim" $1 million fishing tournament. This year, his son got a different kind of big buck - a deer with antlers massive enough to put most chandeliers to shame and obliterate a state record almost two decades old. "He does the fishing, and I do the hunting," said Bill Crutchfield Jr., as he waited yesterday afternoon for state certification. With a crowd of camera-phone-toting hunters and Department of Natural Resources officials watching, Crutchfield hauled the carcass from the refrigerator at Hitchcock Taxidermy in Severn for the tale of the tape.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | November 30, 1992
So what if the Grinch had the idea first.That didn't stop a group of pet owners from dressing up their dogs as reindeer for a contest at the Severna Park Jaycees holiday festival yesterday.But the Grinch had more luck making his dog pull the sleigh full of toys than Kristin Stolkovich had with her Jack Russell terrier, Spot.Spot, a bit overwhelmed by her fake fur and antlers, scampered away in fear as Kristin tried to tie her to the little red wagon.A German shepherd named Echo was less intimidated by her wagon full of toys.
SPORTS
April 17, 2011
Brian Reynolds of Fallston writes: My backyard runs down into a gully. Through the winter, we see deer move back and forth on a daily basis. I have never seen a deer with antlers even though, often there may be six or nine deer together. Can you help a city/suburban guy understand? Outdoors Girl turns to another Brian, DNR's chief deer dude, Brian Eyler , who replies: That is a great question. There are several explanations for what you are seeing. First, only male white-tailed deer have antlers, and in the deer world most times the population will be made up of more female deer than male deer (normally between two to five females per male)
NEWS
April 9, 1999
Howard County schools have provided The Sun with winning entries in the county's Young Authors Contest for second- through fifth-graders. These pupils advanced to the State of Maryland International Reading Association Council (SoMIRAC) contest. In both contests, the authors' works were judged without their names and schools attached.The Sun will periodically publish students' short stories, poetry and photos that have won recognition in school contests and other educational arenas.Kelly HetzlerThunder Hill ElementaryGrade 3Mr. and Mrs. Dear Learn a LessonMr.
SPORTS
By Gene Wojciehowski and Gene Wojciehowski,Los Angeles Times | December 13, 1990
Say what you will about the eccentric, never-met-a-soapbox-he-didn't-like Dale Brown, but give him this much: The Louisiana State coach understands the incredible potential of sophomore center Shaquille O'Neal.As if O'Neal weren't dominant enough, Brown recently arranged for a couple of personal acquaintances to visit Baton Rouge and spend a few days with the 7-footer.Shaquille, meet Bill . . . as in, Walton.Shaquille, meet Kareem . . . as in, legend.What a tag team of tutors this was. Bill Walton visited LSU about two weeks ago and worked with O'Neal for almost four days.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | January 1, 1998
Family musicalsEnter into a world of fantasy, music and adventure this weekend as the Pumpkin Theatre offers two unique performances. Tomorrow, the Pumpkin "Storybook" Theatre performs "Small Crimson Parasol," an interactive musical adaptation of "Little Red Riding Hood" - set in Japan. The tale is presented for one show only at the Hannah More Arts Center, as part of "Friday Family Night Out."This is the final weekend to see performances of the original family musical "Alice in Wonderland" at the Arts Center.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2013
It never takes long for an event like Super Bowl Week to become a theatre of the absurd, so why should anyone have been surprised to see dozens of reporters crowded around a strange-looking guy in a stocking cap and sleeveless muscle shirt for more than an hour while he delivered a rambling manifesto about his special brand of miracle supplements and therapeudic devices? That would be Mitch Ross, of course, the guy at the center of the SI.com “deer antler” story a few days ago that made Ray Lewis temporarily divert attention from his “last ride” to deny that he never, ever used any banned performance-enhancing substances.
NEWS
January 31, 2013
I have read with interest The Sun's coverage of Ray Lewis, S.W.A.T.S. and the deer antler spray that company allegedly provided him ("S.W.A.T.S. co-founder sticks to story," Jan. 31). As far as I have been able to ascertain from these articles, the story line goes something like this: Mr. Lewis denies using a spray which Mitch Ross (as well as two other sources) say did not contain IGF-1 and which experts say could not be used to absorb IGF-1 anyway. Forgive me, but I am unable to find any place in this narrative wherein any dog has been bitten by any man. Can you please explain to me why the media continue with this line?
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Mitch Ross handled Ray Lewis' public berating the way the Ravens linebacker has said he handles difficult times. "That stuff with Ray?" Ross said Wednesday. "I've put that in God's hands. " Ross co-owns SWATS, the company that, according to Sports Illustrated, provided Lewis with deer antler spray and other supplements and apparel to aid in his recovery from a torn triceps. Lewis aggressively denied using the SWATS products again Wednesday from New Orleans, where the Ravens are preparing to play the 49ers in the Super Bowl on Sunday and painted Ross as an opportunist with "no credibility.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | January 30, 2013
Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis was just a little too vague when he responded at Tuesday's Super Bowl media event to a Sports Illustrated report that he might have used a banned substance during his quick recovery from a triceps injury, so he delivered a much stronger denial at Wednesday's news conference at the team's hotel . Maybe that will quiet this strange controversy long enough for the Ravens to focus their complete attention on Sunday's title...
SPORTS
By Chris Korman | January 29, 2013
In a story that includes the phrase "he asks between squirts of deer antler," Sports Illustrated brings the fascinating story of two men aggressively marketing a line of health care supplements -- hologram stickers, the aforementioned deer antler spray, powders, underwear drenched in liquid (seriously) -- to college and pro athletes. The company's name explains the concept: S.W.A.T.S., which stands for Sports with Alternatives to Steroids. At the center of the story is none other than Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis, who is in New Orleans preparing to play the final game of his NFL career on Sunday.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman and The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2013
Even if Ray Lewis did use deer antler spray his body would have never absorbed the banned substance its manufacturer says gives the product its potency, a Johns Hopkins professor said. Sports Illustrated ran an article online Tuesday that connected the Ravens linebacker to S.W.A.T.S. - Sports with Alternatives to Steroids - a company that has marketed alternative health supplements and products to athletes (ThePostGame, which is led by Pikesville native David Katz and currently staffed by former Sun sports intern Robbie Levin, had the story two years ago )
NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 3, 2012
The moon reaches its fullest phase Tuesday, and its name is appropriate enough given the recent weather and the forecast: the Full Thunder Moon. The full moon technically arrives at 2:52 p.m. but will first appear in the Baltimore sky at 8:30 p.m. It may not be brightly visible until a little after that, as the sun sets at 8:37 p.m. It could also be blocked by storm clouds, with a chance for more severe weather in the forecast for Tuesday and Wednesday evenings . The July full moon is also known as the Full Buck Moon, according to the Farmer's Almanac , because this is the time of year bucks' antlers begin to form.
NEWS
March 25, 2005
Antlers: What's the point? MADRID, Spain - When male animals strut their stuff - the rainbow plumes of peacocks, the mighty tusks of an elephant - they might be flaunting their potential for fatherhood, researchers in Spain say. Biologists working for the government's top scientific research body say they have found evidence of this phenomenon in deer that might apply to other species. Features long considered to be only for show or self-defense might indicate the quality of an animal's genes.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 3, 2012
The moon reaches its fullest phase Tuesday, and its name is appropriate enough given the recent weather and the forecast: the Full Thunder Moon. The full moon technically arrives at 2:52 p.m. but will first appear in the Baltimore sky at 8:30 p.m. It may not be brightly visible until a little after that, as the sun sets at 8:37 p.m. It could also be blocked by storm clouds, with a chance for more severe weather in the forecast for Tuesday and Wednesday evenings . The July full moon is also known as the Full Buck Moon, according to the Farmer's Almanac , because this is the time of year bucks' antlers begin to form.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2011
There's a new animal reigning atop home decor. Cheetah, tiger, and leopard prints and other pieces are sharing space — peacefully — with deer- and moose-inspired merchandise. And while the trend seems made for the coming holiday season, home decor experts expect that it will continue well into next year. The thought of antlers on a wall might bring to mind elements of taxidermy rather than the trappings of decor. But antlers aren't reserved for man caves and hunting lodges.
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