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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | April 23, 2014
We're in a new Gilded Age of wealth and power similar to the first Gilded Age, when the nation's antitrust laws were enacted. Those laws should prevent or bust up concentrations of economic power that not only harm consumers but also undermine our democracy -- such as Comcast's pending acquisition of Time Warner Cable. In 1890, when Republican Sen. John Sherman of Ohio urged his congressional colleagues to act against the centralized industrial powers that threatened America, he didn't distinguish between economic and political power because they were one and the same.
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BUSINESS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
More than 30 Maryland cab companies filed a lawsuit Thursday against the popular ride-sharing company Uber, alleging antitrust violations and demanding an unspecified amount of damages for upending the state's cab industry. The lawsuit, filed late Thursday in Baltimore Circuit Court, joins a string of legal actions against Uber as traditional taxicab companies and regulators across the country confront the company's cheaper and consumer-friendly army of drivers. Led by five major cab companies and their drivers, the lawsuit contends that Uber's surge-pricing model is akin to price-fixing, that its refusal to abide by traditional cab regulations creates an unfair marketplace, and that taken together, the company has interfered with cabdrivers' relationships with their clients.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1995
A spat between two telecommunications giants has gotten nastier, with AT&T Corp. now accusing Bell Atlantic Corp. of violating antitrust laws by attempting to squelch competition in the local toll-call business.The allegation came in a counterclaim AT&T filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Newark, N.J., in response to a Bell Atlantic lawsuit that accused the long-distance giant of misleading advertising. The latter suit, filed in February, asked the court to restrain AT&T from advertising discounted rates for toll calls that don't cross long-distance area boundaries.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | April 23, 2014
We're in a new Gilded Age of wealth and power similar to the first Gilded Age, when the nation's antitrust laws were enacted. Those laws should prevent or bust up concentrations of economic power that not only harm consumers but also undermine our democracy -- such as Comcast's pending acquisition of Time Warner Cable. In 1890, when Republican Sen. John Sherman of Ohio urged his congressional colleagues to act against the centralized industrial powers that threatened America, he didn't distinguish between economic and political power because they were one and the same.
BUSINESS
By Ronald J. Ostrow and Ronald J. Ostrow,Los Angeles Times | April 4, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In an effort to defend U.S. business interests overseas, the Department of Justice amended its antitrust enforcement policy yesterday to enable it to challenge foreign businesses that boycott U.S. products, rig bids or otherwise block access to their markets.Although department officials said that the shift was "not aimed at particular foreign markets," the Japanese Foreign Ministry immediately objected to the move on grounds that it is "not permissible under international law."
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court tackled the issue of antitrust and professional sports for the first time in nearly a quarter century yesterday, questioning whether unionized athletes have the right to go to court instead of on strike to get their way with management.Professional sports unions are currently forced to disband if they want to file antitrust lawsuits.But unionized athletes should be covered by antitrust laws if contract talks break down and their leagues act alone in setting player salaries or other working conditions, Kenneth W. Starr, the independent counsel in the Whitewater investigation, argued on behalf of a group of NFL players.
SPORTS
September 11, 1992
1987 Aug. 31: The NFL's collective bargaining agreement with the NFL Players Association expires. A collective bargaining agreement is needed to preserve an organization's exemption from antitrust laws.Sept. 21: NFL players strike. The owners respond by hiring replacement players, and games continue.Oct. 15-16: The strike collapses as scores of veteran players cross picket lines.Oct. 16: NFLPA president Marvin Powell and others file a class-action lawsuit challenging the free-agency system.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | January 25, 1995
Baseball owners are willing to go a long way to claim a victory in the game's bitter labor dispute -- even to another sport.The 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in favor of the National Basketball Association yesterday, dismissing a union claim that the NBA's salary cap violates federal antitrust laws. The court said that antitrust laws do not apply in cases where a collective bargaining relationship exists, and baseball owners quickly seized on the decision as proof that Major League Baseball's antitrust exemption is not a significant factor in the sport's long-running labor war."
NEWS
September 11, 1992
THE ISSUE The NFL's free-agency system, known as Plan B. The system allows each team to retain limited rights to 37 players each season. A protected player is unable to sign with another team without giving his old team the first chance to sign him. If he signs, his new team has to compensate the old team with two first-round draft choices. No restricted players have changed teams under the Plan B system.THE PLAYERS * Plaintiffs: New York Jets running back Freeman McNeil; San Diego guard Dave Richards; Green Bay quarterback Don Majkowski; New York Giants cornerback Mark Collins; Cleveland cornerback Frank Minnifield; Phoenix safety Tim McDonald; former Giants and Cleveland running back Lee Rouson; and former Detroit and Los Angeles Raiders linebacker Niko Noga.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | December 28, 2007
I hope somebody is being groomed in Congress to take the place of U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter whenever he stops serving. For years, Specter, now 77, has been a watchdog on behalf of sports fans' interests, especially when it comes to the NFL. Most recently, Specter and fellow senator Patrick Leahy (Specter is a Republican from Pennsylvania and Leahy is a Democrat from Vermont, so there's nothing partisan here) wrote to the NFL encouraging the league to make tomorrow night's historic Patriots-Giants game available on TV for all viewers.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | March 28, 2011
How deep is corporate influence on President Barack Obama? Is there no business request so anticompetitive, so anticonsumer that the administration would be forced to say no? Should the Justice Department's antitrust division (more than 800 employees; average salary of more than $150,000) just go out of business? We're about to find out. If Obama approves AT&T's proposal to buy T-Mobile, he'll have reached a new Washington low in preventing the kind of oligopoly disaster that even conservative economists agree is bad for consumers and bad for innovation.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,Tribune Washington Bureau | May 12, 2009
WASHINGTON -The Obama administration put large companies on notice that it would be tougher on mergers and attempts to stifle competition, restoring the type of aggressive antitrust enforcement of the 1990s that led to the landmark government case against Microsoft Corp. The tenor set Monday by the Justice Department's new antitrust enforcer, Christine Varney, would bring the United States more in line with the European Union and make it tougher for companies that dominate their markets to abuse their power, experts said.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | December 28, 2007
I hope somebody is being groomed in Congress to take the place of U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter whenever he stops serving. For years, Specter, now 77, has been a watchdog on behalf of sports fans' interests, especially when it comes to the NFL. Most recently, Specter and fellow senator Patrick Leahy (Specter is a Republican from Pennsylvania and Leahy is a Democrat from Vermont, so there's nothing partisan here) wrote to the NFL encouraging the league to make tomorrow night's historic Patriots-Giants game available on TV for all viewers.
BUSINESS
By Walter Hamilton and Walter Hamilton,Los Angeles Times | June 19, 2007
NEW YORK -- Wall Street won a major victory yesterday when the Supreme Court ruled that people who lost money on initial public stock offerings in the late-1990s Internet boom could not sue their brokerages under U.S. antitrust laws. The Supreme Court sided with investment banks that had been accused of conspiring to inflate IPO prices, ruling 7-1 that lawsuits alleging initial public offering abuses have to be brought under securities rather than antitrust statutes. The ruling reversed a 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision that had allowed the class action suit to move forward.
TOPIC
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2005
The Capitol Hill hearings that recently captivated baseball fans with their all-star lineup of witnesses had special resonance in Baltimore. On one side of a long table sat the Orioles' newest star (Sammy Sosa), potentially the next Oriole after Cal Ripken Jr. to be inducted in the Hall of Fame (Rafael Palmeiro) and an Oriole lost years ago in the worst trade the team ever made (Curt Schilling). On the other side sat Rep. Elijah E. Cummings of Baltimore, among the inquisitors on the House Government Reform Committee.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 27, 2002
FRANKFURT, Germany - Seeking to channel its energy into uncovering price-fixing schemes and breaking up cartels, the European Union approved yesterday a landmark overhaul of its antitrust laws. The new laws, adopted by a vote of the economics ministers of the union's 15 member nations, will shift much of the responsibility for regulating ties among companies away from the European Commission and back to individual countries and their courts. Freed from the burden of having to review and approve every proposed joint venture or strategic alliance, authorities in Brussels, Belgium, will be able to concentrate on attacking illegal cartels, which still skew competition in Europe.
NEWS
By Bruce Gottlieb | November 9, 1998
Q. Why is the Microsoft case being tried before a judge, not a jury?A. If the plaintiffs (the Department of Justice and 20 states) were seeking damages (money) from Microsoft, then either side would be entitled to request a jury trial.However, the plaintiffs are not seeking money -- they only seek injunctive relief, such as stopping Microsoft from packaging its Internet browser in Windows 98. The Microsoft trial thus falls under a category of law called "actions in equity."According to a tradition dating back to English law, "actions in equity" are tried before a judge, not a jury.
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 9, 1994
PHILADELPHIA -- As the date for a players' strike approaches, another dispute with momentous implications for the business of baseball advances today to a federal courtroom in Philadelphia.The dispute involves two businessmen who have sued Major League Baseball for denying them the opportunity to buy a team.At the heart of it all is baseball's long-held and much-treasured exemption from federal antitrust laws.The men, Vincent M. Piazza of Valley Forge and Vincent N. Tirendi of Villanova, were part of a group of six investors who in August 1992 agreed to buy the San Francisco Giants for $115 million from Robert Lurie and move the team to St. Petersburg, Fla.The suit, set for argument today before U.S. District Judge John R. Padova, contends that major-league owners, intent on keeping the Giants in San Francisco, schemed to exclude Piazza and Tirendi from the group of would-be buyers, thereby scuttling the deal.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Robert Little and Stacey Hirsh and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2002
A federal judge handed what antitrust experts and consumer advocacy groups said was a clear victory to Microsoft Corp. yesterday, making few changes to a proposed settlement between the software giant and the federal and state governments that charged it with violating antitrust laws. U.S. District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly tweaked dates and other parts of the proposed settlement but did not adopt broad modifications or impose tougher limitations wanted by nine states and the District of Columbia, which did not settle with Microsoft.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2002
Soon after arriving at the MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland for his medical residency, Paul Jung quickly found he was doing as much dirty work as doctoring. Putting in as many as 90 hours a week, Jung schlepped paperwork, drew blood, wheeled patients to X-ray - all the while earning the equivalent of $10 or so an hour. And he says he was one of the lucky ones: His hospital has a reputation for being easy on residents. Now Jung, a research fellow at the Johns Hopkins University, is a plaintiff in a class action lawsuit filed yesterday in Washington that contends the system violates federal antitrust law. At the heart of the lawsuit is the National Resident Matching Program, which pairs the approximately 15,000 medical school graduates with hospitals seeking residents who spend as many as eight years refining their craft under the supervision of senior physicians.
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