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By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,Tribune Washington Bureau | May 12, 2009
WASHINGTON -The Obama administration put large companies on notice that it would be tougher on mergers and attempts to stifle competition, restoring the type of aggressive antitrust enforcement of the 1990s that led to the landmark government case against Microsoft Corp. The tenor set Monday by the Justice Department's new antitrust enforcer, Christine Varney, would bring the United States more in line with the European Union and make it tougher for companies that dominate their markets to abuse their power, experts said.
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BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,Tribune Washington Bureau | May 12, 2009
WASHINGTON -The Obama administration put large companies on notice that it would be tougher on mergers and attempts to stifle competition, restoring the type of aggressive antitrust enforcement of the 1990s that led to the landmark government case against Microsoft Corp. The tenor set Monday by the Justice Department's new antitrust enforcer, Christine Varney, would bring the United States more in line with the European Union and make it tougher for companies that dominate their markets to abuse their power, experts said.
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BUSINESS
February 17, 1995
Oncor to sell cancer testOncor Inc. of Gaithersburg said yesterday that it has acquired an exclusive license to sell a new method for detecting tiny bits of cancer.The genetic test, developed by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, is years away from widespread use. But yesterday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine described experiments showing that the technique could help to alert surgeons when they miss even a few cells of a cancerous tumor.Oncor said it will initially market the technique through its affiliate, OncorMed.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2001
WASHINGTON - The 18 states involved in the Microsoft antitrust case appeared headed for a sharp split yesterday, with one group of attorneys general planning to sign on to the proposed settlement between the software giant and the Bush administration and another group preparing to challenge it, saying it leaves loopholes that would undermine provisions intended to promote competition. After three days of intensive deliberations, only one state attorney general, Tom Reilly of Massachusetts, officially announced his position.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | March 27, 1991
Mitsubishi Electronics America Inc., the United States distributor of Mitsubishi and MGA brand televisions, today agreed to refund $7.95 million to consumers nationwide to settle charges that it unlawfully fixed the retail prices of its television sets.Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said about 5,000 Marylanders who bought Mitsubishi and MGA televisions in 1988 will receive refunds ranging from $20 to $54 each.The price-fixing charges were detailed in complaints filed against Mitsubishi in U.S. District Court in Baltimore today.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1994
Four Annapolis banks have pooled $2 million to form a community housing fund that would make home equity loans available to people in Annapolis with low to moderate incomes.The loan program, designed to help people who may not qualify for traditional loans, is believed to be the first of its kind in the area, Margie H. Muller, state banking commissioner, said yesterday."This is being done all over the United States," she said, "but this is the first in the Annapolis area. There is a similar loan program in Western Maryland."
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | August 18, 1995
WITH ALL the giant mergers going on and no one protesting, I think of the lawyer in the antitrust division of the Justice Department as the Maytag man. He keeps sitting by the telephone, but it never rings.I went to visit him the other day. He was in his bare office with his feet on the desk. He was tossing rolled-up pieces of paper into a small basketball hoop attached to his wastebasket."I'm sorry to bother you," I said."You're not disturbing me," he said. "No one ever comes here anymore.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2001
WASHINGTON - The 18 states involved in the Microsoft antitrust case appeared headed for a sharp split yesterday, with one group of attorneys general planning to sign on to the proposed settlement between the software giant and the Bush administration and another group preparing to challenge it, saying it leaves loopholes that would undermine provisions intended to promote competition. After three days of intensive deliberations, only one state attorney general, Tom Reilly of Massachusetts, officially announced his position.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | March 28, 1991
About 5,000 Marylanders stand to get rebates from Mitsubishi Electronics America Inc. as the result of a settlement of charges that the company unlawfully fixed prices of its television sets.Mitsubishi Electronics America Inc., the United States distributor Mitsubishi and MGA brand televisions, yesterday agreed to refund $7.95 million to consumers nationwide to settle complaints filed against the corporation in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said Marylanders who bought certain brands of Mitsubishi and MGA televisions in 1988 will receive refunds ranging from $20 to $54 each.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 24, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Northwest Airlines Corp.'s bid to buy a controlling stake in Continental Airlines Inc. would unlawfully limit competition in the U.S. airline industry, the U.S. government said in a lawsuit filed yesterday to halt the plan.The lawsuit, filed in a federal court in Detroit, comes after talks between airline lawyers and the Justice Department's antitrust division failed to break an impasse over a plan that would effectively merge the nation's No. 4 and No. 5 airlines.The lawsuit could signal an end to the two-decade-long consolidation of major U.S. airlines.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 19, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The multifaceted career of Joel I. Klein has become indelibly stamped with one public image: the smart kid from a public-housing project who is now a hard-driving government lawyer on a mission to humble America's richest man.But Klein, the federal government's chief enforcer of antitrust laws, is more complex than that, and his headline-making legal joust with Microsoft's billionaire chairman, Bill Gates, will not alone determine whether Klein...
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 24, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Northwest Airlines Corp.'s bid to buy a controlling stake in Continental Airlines Inc. would unlawfully limit competition in the U.S. airline industry, the U.S. government said in a lawsuit filed yesterday to halt the plan.The lawsuit, filed in a federal court in Detroit, comes after talks between airline lawyers and the Justice Department's antitrust division failed to break an impasse over a plan that would effectively merge the nation's No. 4 and No. 5 airlines.The lawsuit could signal an end to the two-decade-long consolidation of major U.S. airlines.
NEWS
By ROBERT A. LEVY | March 8, 1998
Good and bad news from Microsoft hearings last week before the Senate Judiciary Committee: Microsoft Corp., its allies and its rivals agree that there's no need for further antitrust legislation tailored specifically for high-tech industries. That's the good news. But it leaves the Department of Justice's Antitrust Division with a large role to play whenever it perceives that a company has acquired "too much" market power and is behaving in an "anti-competitive" manner. That's the bad news.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1995
A takeover of USAir by United Airlines would face monumental financial and legal hurdles and, if successful, could trigger a domino effect with other airlines scrambling to protect themselves by consolidating, analysts and industry experts said yesterday.Compared with recent mega-deals in the telecommunications industry, a merger between Arlington, Va.-based USAir and United might look minuscule. But it would get far more scrutiny from the U.S. Justice Department's antitrust division because of its implications for the traveling public.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | August 18, 1995
WITH ALL the giant mergers going on and no one protesting, I think of the lawyer in the antitrust division of the Justice Department as the Maytag man. He keeps sitting by the telephone, but it never rings.I went to visit him the other day. He was in his bare office with his feet on the desk. He was tossing rolled-up pieces of paper into a small basketball hoop attached to his wastebasket."I'm sorry to bother you," I said."You're not disturbing me," he said. "No one ever comes here anymore.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 17, 1995
In a victory for Microsoft Corp., a federal appeals court reinstated yesterday the July 1994 antitrust settlement between the company and the Department of Justice, ruling that a lower-court judge had overstepped his authority in rejecting it.The three-judge panel disqualified Judge Stanley Sporkin, who had rejected the settlement in February and ordered the case reassigned to a different judge, to be picked at random. It also ordered that the antitrust settlement be accepted in its current form.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 17, 1995
In a victory for Microsoft Corp., a federal appeals court reinstated yesterday the July 1994 antitrust settlement between the company and the Department of Justice, ruling that a lower-court judge had overstepped his authority in rejecting it.The three-judge panel disqualified Judge Stanley Sporkin, who had rejected the settlement in February and ordered the case reassigned to a different judge, to be picked at random. It also ordered that the antitrust settlement be accepted in its current form.
NEWS
By ROBERT A. LEVY | March 8, 1998
Good and bad news from Microsoft hearings last week before the Senate Judiciary Committee: Microsoft Corp., its allies and its rivals agree that there's no need for further antitrust legislation tailored specifically for high-tech industries. That's the good news. But it leaves the Department of Justice's Antitrust Division with a large role to play whenever it perceives that a company has acquired "too much" market power and is behaving in an "anti-competitive" manner. That's the bad news.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1995
Oncor to sell cancer testOncor Inc. of Gaithersburg said yesterday that it has acquired an exclusive license to sell a new method for detecting tiny bits of cancer.The genetic test, developed by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, is years away from widespread use. But yesterday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine described experiments showing that the technique could help to alert surgeons when they miss even a few cells of a cancerous tumor.Oncor said it will initially market the technique through its affiliate, OncorMed.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1994
Four Annapolis banks have pooled $2 million to form a community housing fund that would make home equity loans available to people in Annapolis with low to moderate incomes.The loan program, designed to help people who may not qualify for traditional loans, is believed to be the first of its kind in the area, Margie H. Muller, state banking commissioner, said yesterday."This is being done all over the United States," she said, "but this is the first in the Annapolis area. There is a similar loan program in Western Maryland."
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