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By Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee and Tribune Newspapers | December 17, 2009
The Federal Trade Commission on Wednesday sued Intel Corp., accusing the computer chip giant of abusing its market dominance for a decade to stifle competition and strengthen its monopoly. The FTC alleges that Intel has waged a systematic and illegal campaign to shut out rival makers of central processing unit chips, the main brains of a computer, by cutting off their access to the marketplace. In doing so, the agency contends, the world's largest chipmaker has deprived consumers of choice by denying them access to potentially superior chips and lower prices.
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BUSINESS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
More than 30 Maryland cab companies filed a lawsuit Thursday against the popular ride-sharing company Uber, alleging antitrust violations and demanding an unspecified amount of damages for upending the state's cab industry. The lawsuit, filed late Thursday in Baltimore Circuit Court, joins a string of legal actions against Uber as traditional taxicab companies and regulators across the country confront the company's cheaper and consumer-friendly army of drivers. Led by five major cab companies and their drivers, the lawsuit contends that Uber's surge-pricing model is akin to price-fixing, that its refusal to abide by traditional cab regulations creates an unfair marketplace, and that taken together, the company has interfered with cabdrivers' relationships with their clients.
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BUSINESS
December 24, 2009
MINNEAPOLIS - United Airlines, Continental, and All Nippon Airways applied for antitrust approval on Wednesday so they can work together more closely on flights across the Pacific. The three carriers already sell tickets on each other's planes as partners in the Star Alliance, which Continental joined in October. But they want to form a joint venture that would strengthen their financial ties. If their immunity application is approved, they would jointly manage trans-Pacific activities, including schedules, prices and sales.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | April 23, 2014
We're in a new Gilded Age of wealth and power similar to the first Gilded Age, when the nation's antitrust laws were enacted. Those laws should prevent or bust up concentrations of economic power that not only harm consumers but also undermine our democracy -- such as Comcast's pending acquisition of Time Warner Cable. In 1890, when Republican Sen. John Sherman of Ohio urged his congressional colleagues to act against the centralized industrial powers that threatened America, he didn't distinguish between economic and political power because they were one and the same.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | May 27, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Initiating a new tactic in the Clinton administration's trade policy, the Justice Department won a settlement yesterday from a British company that keeps the company from preventing U.S. competitors' doing business overseas.The antitrust suit against Pilkington PLC, the world's largest maker of flat glass, accused the British company of monopolizing the technology for making sheets of glass like those used in windowpanes or car windshields.The Justice Department argued that Pilkington fell under U.S. legal jurisdiction because it owns 80 percent of a U.S. glassmaker, Libby-Owens-Ford Co.The case had little to do with the glass market in the United States; instead it sought to ensure that U.S. companies could freely operate abroad.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A divided Supreme Court ruled yesterday that if a business induces city officials to pass new ordinances to shut out or harm a rival company, both the business and the local officials could qualify for immunity from federal antitrust law.So long as the city had been granted authority by a state to pass laws that could reduce competition, the firm that lost out as a result may not sue for antitrust damages under the Sherman Act, the court ruled...
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 18, 1997
WESTBOROUGH, Mass. -- Staples Inc. and Office Depot Inc. said yesterday that they have agreed with a Federal Trade Commission request to extend the antitrust review in Staples' proposed $4.5 billion purchase of Office Depot.The Hart-Scott-Rodino waiting period, which was to expire Feb. 25, was pushed back to March 5.That will give the office-supply retailers time to gather additional information the FTC requested, Staples said in a statement.The FTC is talking with other companies to see if they are interested in buying stores that might be sold in order for the transaction to get antitrust approval.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 9, 1999
WASHINGTON -- A government investigation of the movie studio and theater industry focuses on possible violations of a 51-year-old antitrust settlement that restricts the way films are distributed, sources familiar with the case said yesterday.Late last week, the Justice Department sent information demands to the nation's top film distributors -- including Walt Disney Co., Viacom Inc.'s Paramount and Time Warner Inc.'s Warner Bros. -- as well as Loews Cineplex Entertainment Corp. and possibly other theater chains, the sources said.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 7, 2003
BRUSSELS, Belgium - Microsoft Corp. has continued to abuse its dominance of the software market and could be subject to fines, the European Commission said yesterday in a preliminary ruling in its long-running antitrust case against the company. The commission, the administrative arm of the European Union, also said it wants to force Microsoft to disclose the software coding that competitors would need to make their server systems compatible with Windows. In a statement of objections it has sent to Microsoft, the commission repeated accusations that the software company has leveraged its dominant position in computer operating systems to gain a dominance in server systems and music-playback software.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 29, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Striking down an antitrust rule nearly a century old, the Supreme Court ruled yesterday that it is no longer automatically unlawful for manufacturers and distributors to agree on setting minimum retail prices. The decision will give producers significantly more leeway, though not unlimited power, to dictate retail prices and to restrict the flexibility of discounters. Five justices said the new rule could, in some instances, lead to more competition and better service. But four dissenting justices agreed with the submission of 37 states and consumer groups that the abandonment of the old rule would lead to significantly higher prices and less competition for consumer and other goods.
NEWS
By Norman Hawker and Robert Lande | May 16, 2011
The Department of Justice's antitrust case against Microsoft was one of the largest and most carefully watched in history. The courts ruled that Microsoft illegally maintained its monopoly of personal computer operating systems (OS). After years of oversight of a "behavioral remedy," the department's notoriously weak settlement with Microsoft expired Thursday. After the finding of liability and almost a decade of monitoring Microsoft's behavior, the net result has been to leave Microsoft pretty much where it started — with its Windows monopoly intact.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | March 28, 2011
How deep is corporate influence on President Barack Obama? Is there no business request so anticompetitive, so anticonsumer that the administration would be forced to say no? Should the Justice Department's antitrust division (more than 800 employees; average salary of more than $150,000) just go out of business? We're about to find out. If Obama approves AT&T's proposal to buy T-Mobile, he'll have reached a new Washington low in preventing the kind of oligopoly disaster that even conservative economists agree is bad for consumers and bad for innovation.
SPORTS
By Sam Farmer, Tribune Newspapers | March 11, 2011
The union representing NFL players pushed away from the negotiating table and decertified Friday, an extreme measure that leaves the federal courts to determine the immediate future of the nation's most popular sports league. Decertifying — dissolving the union — cleared the way for individual players to file antitrust lawsuits against the league, which likely could be barred from locking out those players. In the immediate aftermath of decertification, a group of players that included three of the NFL's most popular quarterbacks — Tom Brady, Peyton Manning and Drew Brees — filed an antitrust lawsuit against the league in U.S. District Court to prevent a lockout.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
State attorneys general in Maryland and 32 other states have reached a $173 million settlement with six computer chip manufacturers who were accused in antitrust lawsuits of conspiring to raise prices on their products. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler said the settlement with Micron Technology In, NEC Electronics America Inc., Infineon Technologies, Hynix Semiconductor, Elpida Memory Inc. and Mosel-Vitelic Corp. offers restitution for consumers and state and local government agencies that paid higher prices for computers and other electronics because of the alleged price fixing scheme.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 9, 2010
The nation's largest provider of voting equipment will forgo its acquisition of a rival company as part of an antitrust settlement reached with nine states, including Maryland, according to the Department of Justice. Election Systems & Software will divest all assets from its September 2009 purchase of Premier Election Solutions, which was the second-largest voting system company in the country. The acquisition was finalized six days before bids were due to install a new optical scan voting system in Maryland, limiting the state to contracting with ES&S or continuing under the current system, according to the attorney general's office.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2009
MINNEAPOLIS - United Airlines, Continental, and All Nippon Airways applied for antitrust approval on Wednesday so they can work together more closely on flights across the Pacific. The three carriers already sell tickets on each other's planes as partners in the Star Alliance, which Continental joined in October. But they want to form a joint venture that would strengthen their financial ties. If their immunity application is approved, they would jointly manage trans-Pacific activities, including schedules, prices and sales.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | October 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The proposed merger of Bell Atlantic Corp. and the nation's largest cable-television company faces government inquiries that could keep the deal under a legal cloud for years -- with no guarantee of official approval.Within hours of yesterday's announcement of the huge corporate union -- valued at $30 billion or more -- federal officials were questioning the impact on consumers and competitors. One key legislator criticized the deal as a "double whammy" for consumers."This will test the mettle of the Clinton administration in a very early and dramatic way," said Andrew Schwartzman, a communications industry legal analyst and head of the Media Access Project.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 3, 2000
Microsoft Corp. asked a federal judge yesterday to dismiss 37 of the 62 antitrust cases against it in Baltimore, saying it never sold any computer systems to any of those who sued. The 62 cases, lawsuits that were filed as legal echoes of the Justice Department and state governments' massive antitrust case against the software giant, have been collected for joint handling by Chief U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz. Unlike the federal and state case, the Baltimore lawsuits - filed by private companies and individuals - seek tripled damages from Microsoft, claiming that it violated federal or state antitrust law by monopolizing software markets and by charging inflated prices.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee and Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee,Tribune Newspapers | December 17, 2009
WASHINGTON - - The Federal Trade Commission on Wednesday sued Intel Corp., accusing the computer chip giant of abusing its market dominance for a decade to stifle competition and strengthen its monopoly. The FTC alleges that Intel has waged a systematic and illegal campaign to shut out rival makers of central processing unit chips, the main brains of a computer, by cutting off their access to the marketplace. In doing so, the agency contends, the world's largest chipmaker has deprived consumers of choice by denying them access to potentially superior chips and lower prices.
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